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DominicanPlayer
01-05-2006, 09:38 AM
http://www.hoy.com.do/app/article.aspx?id=60725&action=add_comment&commentMode=true#comments

Agente Libre
01-05-2006, 03:30 PM
Let's see ... A-Rod was born in U.S. (presumably because his Dominican parents felt he would have a better life in U.S.), has lived in U.S. his entire life, was educated in U.S., works in U.S., and became a multimillionaire at age 18 in U.S., but he's a Dominican first?

That's the dumbest thing I ever heard. If A-Rod isn't an American first and foremost, then NONE of us are.

Mattingly
01-05-2006, 04:20 PM
http://www.hoy.com.do/app/article.aspx?id=60725&action=add_comment&commentMode=true#comments
What exactly does that article say in English?

Some have wondered aloud why Mike Piazza is playing for Italy, despite his having been born here, but is of Italian-American heritage.

Hideki Matsui didn't wish to choose between his native Japan and the USA, so he declined. Can you offer any reason why Dominican fans would be upset that Alex Rodriguez chose to play for a country in which his parents came from, but not himself?

west coast orange and black
01-05-2006, 04:58 PM
in latin countries, family ties are strong. rodriguez is thought of as one of their own, two-three.

Mattingly
01-05-2006, 06:06 PM
in latin countries, family ties are strong. rodriguez is thought of as one of their own, two-three.
Family ties are pretty strong in many nationalities. He's Caribbean, and many families there would also have strong ties. Puerto Rico, Aruba, Jamaica, Haiti, Grenada, Trinidad, etc.

Hideki Matsui, as mentioned in a similar thread in the NYY forum, was both born in Japan and played there professionally for 10 years. I see his ties to Japan being stronger than Rodriguez' ties to the DR, but that's just me.

Last I heard, the USA is a country, and since that's where he was born, why can't he play for the country where he was born? If that's not the case, then who does play for the American team then? Most people are from elsewhere anyway, per the countless immigrants coming through Ellis Island?

Agente Libre
01-05-2006, 07:38 PM
It's just insanity. 95% of the people in D.R. want to move to U.S., but now A-Rod is some sort of traitor for playing for the country he was born in and has lived in his entire life.

Cubano100%
01-05-2006, 09:10 PM
If the country you were born calls you, you got to go and represent that flag. So ARod should play for the USA. If USA does not need him or does not want him, maybe he can play for another country.

This is turning into a Spanish Soap Opera. Specially, one of those really bad and low quality Soap Operas shown on Telemundo or Univision.

Bonus
01-06-2006, 12:52 AM
Couple of quick points that need to be made (or repeated):

Mattingly: Piazza is able to play for Italy under the crazy rules for WBC. However, even under these crazy rules, Matsui could not (and no special ancestral exemption would be sought in order for him to) play for the US.

Now, for my opinion: A-Rod created this controversy by first suggesting that he would play for the DR. Most people assumed that he would play for his native US. (As a contrast, there is no suggestion that Manny would play for the US, and he never raised the possibility himself). By first entertaining the idea of playing for the DR, A-Rod made it impossible to then turn around and not play for the DR and play instead for the US. He could have very easily come right out and said that he would play for his native US and that would have been the end of the story. For e.g., nobody is saying that Nomar should play for Mexico.

My theories: #1--I think this whole thing is a smokescreen. Note that big name Yankees are not yet committed to playing. My theory is that Steinbrenner does not want the meat of his $200 million annual investment futzing around in a meaningless (to him) tournament. So, I'd expect no A-Rod, no Matsui. I still haven't yet heard whether Sheffield, Unit, or Jeter will play for the US. If anyone is aware of a positive Yankee committment to play, let me know. (In this same vein, I am suspicious of Pedro's toe injury).

#2--another thing that A-Rod, Matsui, and Sheffield (and for that matter, Bonds) have in common is that they are big (too big?) and hit the ball far. WBC will have more stringent testing for steroids than MLB. If any player is taking steroids and is worried about getting caught, I expect them to make up some lame excuse and duck out of the tournament.

Obviously, it is too early to say. But let's count the number of Yankees that play in the WBC. Let's also count how many big-name players with bad acne and zits on their backs come up with a reason not to play.

DominicanPlayer
01-06-2006, 06:33 AM
First of all. Americans dont really consider anybody whos parents are foreign to be really an American. even if the kid was born here in the USA. Well many of them think that way.

Captain Cold Nose
01-06-2006, 06:51 AM
First of all. Americans dont really consider anybody whos parents are foreign to be really an American. even if the kid was born here in the USA. Well many of them think that way.
One of the reasons this forum is working is ridiculously unfounded stereotypes aren't getting thrown out in abundance. I guess this one has to go on that list.
That must be the reason why Dukakis lost the Presidency in 1988.

Licey Fan
01-06-2006, 08:53 AM
I still haven't yet heard whether Sheffield, Unit, or Jeter will play for the US. If anyone is aware of a positive Yankee committment to play, let me know. (In this same vein, I am suspicious of Pedro's toe injury).



I won't address the A-Rod issue again... Is pointless... Is his life, and his career... He can do whatever he wants...

About your question... Jeter's committed to team USA, so I've read...

west coast orange and black
01-06-2006, 06:03 PM
i believe it matters not how we see the players, two-three, rather, how they see themselves.

west coast orange and black
01-06-2006, 06:10 PM
i, too, find it interesting that the yankee players have been relatively quiet on the tournament.

also, bonds eagerly signed on to play rather early on, bonus. he stated that it was dream of his to play in the olympics and wbc is the next biggest thing.
his marquee name was recognized as being very valuable, so wbc and u.s. officials sought him out early for commitment.
this occurred after it was established that wada-testing would take place.

west coast orange and black
01-06-2006, 06:57 PM
mattingly: What exactly does that article say in English?


the soap opera that is mounting regarding alex rodriguez’ possible participation in the world baseball classic has released a new chapter with the rumor that he will don the uniform of the united states.

according to the new york times, rodriguez, winner of the 2005 american league most valuable player award, is said to announce his final decision this week as to whether he will play for the united states.

for the past month rodriguez had said that he would not play in the classic because he did not want to insult the united states, where he was born, nor the dominican republic, where one of his parents was born.

rodriguez has the option and the right to play with either of those two teams.

the journalist’s source does not explain the reason(s) why rodriguez, if in fact he has made his final decision to play in the wbc, has had a change of attitude.

although more than 200 big leaguers are committed to play in the first round of the wbc, it is still not guaranteed that cuban players can enter the united states.

already committed to play for the united states are derek jeter and johnny damon, both teammates of rodriguez. two yankee players who could also see wbc play are bernie williams, for puerto rico, and second baseman robinson cano, for the dominican republic.

yankee outfielder hideki matsui has already stated that he will not participate in the classic.

16 nations are divided into four groups in the round-robin play. teams will be in the united states for round 2 play, and the top four teams advance to the semifinals in san diego from march 18 - 20 of next year [2006].

after this initial tournament, play is next scheduled for 2009, and then every four years thereafter.

wbc organizers hope that if cuba does participate another country will soon be selected to take its place. countries that refuse to participate in the classic might be banned from olympic games play.

Mattingly
01-07-2006, 12:28 PM
i, too, find it interesting that the yankee players have been relatively quiet on the tournament.

also, bonds eagerly signed on to play rather early on, bonus. he stated that it was dream of his to play in the olympics and wbc is the next biggest thing.
his marquee name was recognized as being very valuable, so wbc and u.s. officials sought him out early for commitment.
this occurred after it was established that wada-testing would take place.
I haven't followed it on a per-team basis, but how many teams that routinely make the playoffs are sending players? The Braves have been doing this longer than the Yanks, so how many players are they sending?

As to Bonds, I'm not sure what his physical condition is right now, but he had several months off. Alex usually plays 160+ games/year.

Had that thing been in February, it may be different. I still don't like that players have to go from one nation to the next right in the middle of spring training. Do you think any NFL players would play in any international gridiron games right in the middle of their pre-season?

I'm guessing that the WBC is great for the fans, but for the players, it may be like Interleague: nice, but just another game. This time, it's an exhibition.

Guys not only have to play, but play well. I remember Bonds, A-Rod and others played in Japan around November or December 2004 in an exhibition game. Still, they were relatively warmed up. I think that had the WBC been after the season, rather than during the pre-season, that may get more people interested.

Important culturally, but with guys expected to put on a show, when they may only be doing so-so after a long winter, I sometimes wish they'd just not repeat this next season, or at least find a better time.

As an example, look at the All-Star Game. Pitchers love to appear, but they may only face 1-2 batters, especially if they are in a set cycle for when they'll pitch next. So what if someone plays and twists an ankle? What if a guy gets HBP? True, you're risking that in every game, but at least those count.

I like the idea, but while I can understand people wanting to see baseball played on a truly international level, I don't expect all-out performances, especially in March.

Mattingly
01-07-2006, 12:31 PM
mattingly: What exactly does that article say in English?

the soap opera that is mounting regarding alex rodriguez’ possible participation in the world baseball classic has released a new chapter with the rumor that he will don the uniform of the united states.

according to the new york times, rodriguez, winner of the 2005 american league most valuable player award, is said to announce his final decision this week as to whether he will play for the united states.

for the past month rodriguez had said that he would not play in the classic because he did not want to insult the united states, where he was born, nor the dominican republic, where one of his parents was born.

rodriguez has the option and the right to play with either of those two teams.

the journalist’s source does not explain the reason(s) why rodriguez, if in fact he has made his final decision to play in the wbc, has had a change of attitude.

although more than 200 big leaguers are committed to play in the first round of the wbc, it is still not guaranteed that cuban players can enter the united states.

already committed to play for the united states are derek jeter and johnny damon, both teammates of rodriguez. two yankee players who could also see wbc play are bernie williams, for puerto rico, and second baseman robinson cano, for the dominican republic.

yankee outfielder hideki matsui has already stated that he will not participate in the classic.

16 nations are divided into four groups in the round-robin play. teams will be in the united states for round 2 play, and the top four teams advance to the semifinals in san diego from march 18 - 20 of next year [2006].

after this initial tournament, play is next scheduled for 2009, and then every four years thereafter.

wbc organizers hope that if cuba does participate another country will soon be selected to take its place. countries that refuse to participate in the classic might be banned from olympic games play.
So only *ONE* of Alex' parents was born in the DR and he's supposed to go running over there to play for them? Was this his Mom or Dad, and where was his other parent born?

I think he has decided to play in the USA. Still, he seems to be more American than anything else, so his playing for the United States of America--a country where individuals are born and should be proud to represent, last I've heard--would be a great thing for me to see.

I certainly understand the pride of people born in the Caribbean islands as well as other countries, but people should also understand the same for those who were born here.

west coast orange and black
01-07-2006, 07:44 PM
father victor rodriguez was born in the dominican republic.
he caught for a pro team there.

Dominican4Life
01-08-2006, 05:02 PM
NEW YORK -- It wasn't so long ago that Alex Rodriguez was leaning toward joining the Dominican Republic's squad in the World Baseball Classic. Then came the beginning of his PR nightmare -- he was abandoning not just Pedro Martinez and David Ortiz, but Roger Clemens and Derek Jeter, too, choosing to sit out the tournament altogether.



AP Photo/Matthew S. Gunby
Alex Rodriguez's decision not to play is a blow not only to the Dominican and U.S. teams, but also to the World Baseball Classic as a whole.That was followed by yet another flip-flop, reported by The New York Times: Not only had A-Rod changed his mind, he was changing teams, this time joining the U.S. roster.

To all this, Rodriguez asks for a moment of clarity: He says he's still not playing.

The third baseman insists the tidal wave of headlines was not only premature, but entirely false. He's saying no to Dominicans, no to the Americans and better-luck-next-time to the Players Association, which his handlers believe is responsible for prematurely leaking the story.

"When Alex said he was staying out, he meant it," is how a person close to the third baseman put it. A-Rod intends to "discuss" the matter with union officials this week, as his agent, Scott Boras, promised, but Rodriguez already has told his inner circle, as well as Yankees officials, that he's focusing on spring training instead of international play.

That decision will obviously satisfy George Steinbrenner, who's openly opposed to the WBC and has effectively blocked Jorge Posada, Randy Johnson and Mike Mussina. The Yankees' indirect pressure has additionally pressured Hideki Matsui into withdrawing from the Japanese team.

And Mariano Rivera is speaking of cutting his ties with the Panamanian squad, given its underdog status against other Latin American and Caribbean teams.

Of course, owners and GMs can't actually prohibit anyone from representing his country. Only the commissioner's office can do so, after a team files an appeal based on the likelihood of injury. As well, the union has only peer-pressure leverage and no contractual way to enforce participation.

But the stakes are obviously high, as the association sees the WBC as a way to grow the game and increase future revenue streams for its constituents.

It makes perfect sense -- in theory. But getting the players to go full bore in spring training might not be so easy, and clearly frustrated union chief Gene Orza when he learned that Matsui was bowing out.

"You only hope the player who says no has a full understanding of the tournament and the consequences of his non-participation," Orza told The Times, "especially when it's a player who wouldn't be here and who wouldn't have the new contract he has but for the association."

It's unclear what "consequences" Orza was referring to other than a less-than-enthusiastic response from fans. Already, FOX has passed on the chance to broadcast the tournament, and the games themselves will coincide (and compete) with the NCAA Tournament.

Not even the Latin squads, which appear to be the most enthusiastic participants, are immune to defection. There's word in Met circles that Martinez's damaged right toe -- still sore enough to require a specially constructed shoe for 2006 -- isn't all that serious. Martinez, however, might use the injury as a way out of pitching for the Dominican team.

Martinez, no dummy, will apparently let the Mets act as the heavies while claiming he'd love to lead the Dominicans to victory. But Pedro has privately told friends he prefers to go slowly in March while rebuilding his arm strength. Given that Martinez's fastball had shrunk to 86 mph last September, the Mets are more than willing to take the heat for him.

The fact that Martinez has to hide behind his owners is proof of the intense national pressure being applied to Dominican stars - not just to participate in the WBC, but to defeat the United States. That's the reason A-Rod initially withdrew.

Although he was born in New York, is an American citizen and has lived his entire adult life in the U.S., Rodriguez was nevertheless leaned on by his entire Dominican network, including his mother and her family, all urging him to switch allegiances.

"Everyone was in his face; it was unreal," said one member of his camp. "After a while, it got to be so overwhelming Alex had to back off."

Rodriguez's absence, besides wounding the Dominican squad, is more damaging to the tournament's marketing quotient in this country. That might explain why the union jump-started the whispering campaign that A-Rod was coming back, this time to play side by side with Jeter. How could he say no when everyone -- newspapers, TV, the Internet -- had already reported that baseball's best all-around player would be at third base for the U.S. team?

The trouble was that no one spoke directly to Rodriguez, handlers say, a move they say will only solidify his decision to stick with the Yankees in spring training. When a Yankee official was asked if he was pleased by A-Rod's decision, he merely raised his eyebrows as if to ask: Are you kidding?

Bob Klapisch is a sports columnist for The Record (N.J.) and a regular contributor to ESPN.com.

By the way both parents are dominican

Mattingly
01-08-2006, 05:13 PM
father victor rodriguez was born in the dominican republic.
he caught for a pro team there.
Thanks. Where was his Mother born?

I'm thinking, what if his Mom were of British descent, then people would wonder why he didn't play for them, if they have a team. Then again, if his Mom were Cuban, there would be another controversy up there, and Alex hasn't even decided whether he'll play or not.

I see he'll never catch a break on this thing. :o :(

Mattingly
01-08-2006, 06:12 PM
By the way both parents are dominican
I've merged your post here. If you could use links, that would be great. Someone just posted this article in another forum, also w/o a link.

http://sports.espn.go.com/mlb/columns/story?columnist=klapisch_bob&id=2284007

I'm not convinced that, per your original thread's title, that Alex Rodriguez had made a final statement that he definitely wasn't playing. I thought he was still deciding.

Also, you're telling me that both of his parents are Dominican? Were they both born there, or was one (his Mother) born here? If you scroll up to post #17, you'll see that someone mentioned that only his Father was Dominican.

Dominican4Life
01-08-2006, 06:23 PM
Both of his parents are dominican read his biography. and he got the fundamentals in the Dominican Rep as a kid. thats where he learn to play baseball. and if it wasnt for his Dominican heritage he wouldnt be a baseball player today, thats for sure.

Dominican4Life
01-08-2006, 06:31 PM
Alexander Emmanuel Rodriguez (A-Rod) was born in New York City on July 27, 1975 and lived there with his family -- parents, Lourdes and Victor, his older brother Joe and sister Suzy until he was four years old.

At the age of four, his parents moved back to their native land -- the Dominican Republic. It was there where Alex first learned and played the game of baseball.

Four years later his family moved back to the United States, settling in Miami, Florida. Alex started playing Khoury League baseball, sponsored by the Boys Club in Coconut Grove (Miami). A league which he still keeps in touch with, "I've always been close with the league, and I recently donated $25,000 to it. I have fond memories, and I think back about those days all the time," said Rodriguez.

At the age of nine, when Alex was in the fifth grade, his father left the home, leaving his mother Lourdes to provide for three kids. She worked two jobs to make sure there was always food on the table and enough to provide for a private education. As the baby of the family, Alex was shocked and he kept thinking his dad just step out momentarily. "I kept thinking my father would come back, but he never did," said Alex during an interview with Sports Illustrated. "But it was O.K., all the love I had for him I just gave to my mother. She deserved it."

It was a tough experience for Alex as his mother had to raise three children on a small income as a secretary and a waitress. So when Alex excelled in baseball at Westminster Christian High School, he knew he wanted to become a professional baseball player and make a lot of money from it.

Alex was a tall, lanky kid who played his favorite position -- shortstop. He worked hard on his defense and became great at playing that position, but he was a horrible hitter. He didn't have much bat speed or power so the coach always batted him eighth or ninth, so he started lifting weights and took extra batting practice.

Alex started hitting with power and became a prolific hitter, so much that as a sophomore in high school he participated in the U.S. Junior Olympic baseball team. That was a huge boost of confidence for Alex as competing at an international level was a significant part of his early baseball years. Alex finished high school baseball career with a .419 batting average with 17 homers, 70 RBIs, and 90 steals in 100 games.

In the summer of 1993, following high school graduation, Alex was approached by several major league baseball scouts. His dream of playing in the major leagues was about to come true. The Seattle Mariners chose him as their #1 choice in the June 1993 draft -- Alex was just 17 years old.

At the time he didn't want to be a Mariner. It was too far from home. After meeting Tommy Lasorda, he found himself wanting to be a Dodger. Negotiations between the Rodriguez’s family and the Mariners turned ugly with his adviser/agent, Scott Boras allowing correspondence to take place only by fax.

Then finally, on Aug. 30, just hours before Rodriguez was to begin classes at the University of Miami, he and the Mariners agreed to a three-year, $1.3 million contract.

Now Rodriguez had to prove himself in the big leagues.

In 1994, his first full season as a professional, he played at all four levels in the Mariners organization, including a month with the big club. He made his major league debut at 18---becoming just the third shortstop to do so since 1900---but hit only .204 in 17 games and was sent back to Calgary, which at that time was where the Mariners’ Triple A team played.

After the ‘94 season Rodriguez played winter league ball in the Dominican Republic, where he had spent part of his childhood. “It was the toughest experience of my life,” Rodriguez says of his three months of winter ball, in which he batted only .179. “I just got my tail kicked and learned how hard this game can be. It was brutal, but I recommend it to every young player.”

In 1996, Alex began his first full year in the Major Leagues. Rodriguez hit .358 with 36 home runs, 123 RBIs, 141 runs scored, and 54 doubles all along playing excellent defense at shortstop. He became the 14th youngest player to make the All-Star team at 20 years old, 11 months and 18 days. He was 3 points shy of the MVP award and on the brink to stardom. He is now recognized as the new breed of shortstops who can field and hit for power, replacing current legends like Cal Ripken, Jr. and Ozzie Smith.

The following years, Alex was recognized as one of the great shortstops in the game. In 1999, he joined the exclusive 40/40 club (40 home runs and 40 stolen bases in the same year), a feat which has only been accomplished by Barry Bonds (1993) and Jose Canseco (1988).

The 2000 season was full of distractions for A-Rod. The Seattle fans and media wanted him to stay, as did the Mariners, but a contract agreement was never reached and A-Rod became a free agent.

Despite the distractions, Rodriguez continued to put up another 40 home run/100 RBI season, which helped propel the Mariners back to the playoffs. Despite hitting .371 against Chicago and New York, Rodriguez and the Mariners failed to reach the World Series one more time. It would be the last season for Rodriguez in Seattle.

In the winter of 2000, Alex Rodriguez with the help of his agent Scott Boras landed a 10-year, $252 million deal with the Texas Rangers. A deal which is still the richest contract in sports history.

In his first season (2001) with the Texas Rangers, A-Rod was under the microscope and everyone questioned his huge salary. He was constantly pelted with questions about his large contract, but A-Rod took it well and continue to perform on the field. A-Rod went out and had his finest season as a pro, hitting an astonishing 52 home runs and collecting a career high, 135 RBIs.

His 52 home runs in 2001 surpassed a 43-year old record among shortstops.

On September 23, 2001, against the Anaheim Angels, A-Rod hit his 48th home run of the season, breaking Ernie Banks' major league record for most home runs in a season by a shortstop. The legendary hall of famer, Ernie Banks had set the record with 47 in 1958 with playing with the Chicago Cubs.

"I am very happy for him," Texas manager Jerry Narron said. "He's the best shortstop in the history of the game. I believe there isn't another player like him that has done as much as he has for his team. What he brings to the club is leadership and enthusiasm. He's a special guy and is a better man than he is a player."

Ernie Banks sent A-Rod this message, "Congratulations to A-Rod, I knew you could do it. You are a great man, an impressive baseball player, and a role model. I love the game of baseball, and I love to see players with heart and drive like yours who continue the spirit of the game.''

A-Rod has gone to the playoffs three times with the Seattle Mariners, but has never gone to the World Series. His career post-season average is .340 and had a .371 (13-35) batting average in 9 post-season games with the Mariners in 2000. In the 6-game loss to the NY Yankees in the 2000 American League Championship series, A-Rod batted .409 (9-22) with 2 homers and 5 RBIs.

In February 2004, the New York Yankees made a blockbuster trade when they acquired Alex Rodriguez, the 2003 American League MVP from the Texas Rangers for second baseman Alfonso Soriano and a player to be named.

"This is a dream come true playing in New York where I was born," said Rodríguez at his NYC press conference. "I feel overjoyed to play for a great manager like Joe Torre and for such a great team like the Yankees."
The Yankees will pay 15 million per year to A-Rod in 2004, 2005 and 2006, $16 million in 2007 and 2008, $17 million in 2009 and $18 million in 2010. The Rangers will pay A-Rod $3 million in 2004, $6 million in 2005 and 2006, $7 million in 2007, $8 million in 2009 and $6 million in 2010 for their share.

A-Rod will move from his usual shortstop position and will play third base for the Yankees.

Personal:

Rodriguez lifts weights at the team clubhouse six days a week to keep himself in tip-top shape and pampers himself like a matinee idol. He washes his face with Clinique soap, gets his hair cut every 10 days and indulges in a monthly manicure and pedicure. And nothing stands between Rodriguez and his four-times-daily flossing: “I’m big into teeth.”

Rodriguez also gets a lot of attention from the ladies, “Everywhere we go, women go nuts,” says former Mariners' teammate catcher John Marzano.

In 2001, People Magazine named A-Rod as one of the "50 Most Beautiful People in the World."

Besides being rich and beautiful, A-Rod likes to work with children. In 1998, he founded the Alex Rodriguez Foundation which works extensively with the Boys & Girls Clubs of Miami, hosting an annual dinner to raise money for that organization.

He lives in Miami in the off-season and has two dogs (one was given to him by Jose Canseco), one in each of his homes. His idol is Cal Ripkin Jr. and he likes playing basketball and golf in the off-season.

In November 2002, A-Rod married his longtime girlfriend, Cynthia Scurtis in a private wedding in Dallas. A reception was conducted at his home in Highland Park, an upscale Dallas suburb. Among the guests were former Baltimore star Cal Ripken Jr., Rodriguez's boyhood idol.

What A-Rod likes in a women is “simplicity, intelligence and confidence.” He also doesn't like women taller than him. Not a big problem since A-Rod is 6'3" inches tall.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

Alex Rodriguez Biography

Alex Rodriguez has more cash in his wallet, and hits more homers, than almost anyone in baseball. But will he be able to lead the Yankees to another World Series? Get the 411 on the Yankees' superstar at third base.

Alex Rodriguez Growing Up
Alex Emanuel Rodriguez was born in New York City on July 27, 1975. He stayed in NYC until he was four, when his family moved back to his parents' native land - the Dominican Republic. It was there that Alex Rodriguez first learned to play baseball. Four years later, his family moved back to the United States and settled in Miami, Florida. Not long after that, Alex's parents got divorced and his father left town. His mother took two jobs to support Alex, his brother Joe and his sister, Suzy. Seeing his mom struggle to work two jobs made Alex Rodriguez determined to become a professional baseball player and make a lot of money.

Alex Rodriguez - From A-Rod to PayRod
Alex Rodriguez was a star baseball player at Westminster Christian High School, where he played shortstop. Rodriguez took extra batting practice and started lifting weights to add more power to his swing. His extra training paid off, and Rodriguez finished his high school career with a .419 average and 17 homers in 100 games. He also caught the attention of baseball scouts and Rodriguez was picked in the first round by the Seattle Mariners in the 1993 entry draft. In 1996, his first full season with the Mariners, Alex Rodriguez hit 36 homeruns and became one of the youngest players to make the All-Star team. Over the next two seasons, A-Rod would make a name for himself as one of the first shortstops who could hit for power. In 1999, he became just the third player in MLB history to hit 40 homers and steal 40 bases in a season. His big numbers at the plate also meant big numbers for A-Rod's paycheck. After the 2000 season, Alex Rodriguez left the Seattle Mariners to sign a ten-year contract with the Texas Rangers for a whopping $252 million!

Alex Rodriguez - The Best Baseball Player Ever?
Alex Rodriguez continued to be a run-producing machine after moving to the Rangers, but he was often questioned about his massive salary ($25.2 million a year)! He hit 52 homeruns in 2001, which broke the record for homers in a season by a shortstop. In 2003, he was named the American League MVP, after hitting 47 homeruns and driving in 118 runs. Despite his personal success at the plate, the Rangers as a team still sucked and continued to finish in last place. In 2004, Alex Rodriguez realized he wasn't happy just being a good looking baseball player who makes a mountain of money. He also wanted to play for a winning team. On February 16, 2004, he agreed to be traded to the New York Yankees. The move to New York meant he would have to play third base instead of shortstop, but Alex Rodriguez felt it was a small price to pay for a shot at winning a World Series. If A-Rod continues to put up big numbers and leads the Yankees to another World Series or two, he could go down in history as one of the best baseball players of all time.

Alex Rodriguez - Did You Know?
When he was a kid, Alex Rodriguez's favorite players were Keith Hernandez, Dale Murphy and Cal Ripken Jr..
Alex Rodriguez has impeccable grooming habits. He gets his hair cut every 10 days and has a monthly manicure and pedicure. He also flosses his teeth four times a day.
Alex Rodriguez has three dogs - a Golden Labrador named Shorty and two German Sheperds named Ripper and Gypsy.
Alex Rodriguez has a wife named Cynthia, who is a teacher. They were married at a private wedding in Dallas in 2002.

mac195
01-08-2006, 07:31 PM
Hideki Matsui didn't wish to choose between his native Japan and the USA, so he declined.

That's hard to believe. Matsui is in no way American. Did he actually say something to that effect?

Agente Libre
01-08-2006, 07:38 PM
Dominican4Life -- You want us to believe that if A-Rod did not live in the D.R. from age 4 to 8 that he wouldn't have become a baseball player?

I don't think Cal Ripken or Mike Schmidt ever lived in the D.R.

Cubano100%
01-08-2006, 09:27 PM
Alex Rodriguez received most of his training as a baseball player in the USA. I do not know how much baseball can someone learn from age 4 to 8. I am sure he did not play to much being that young.

Remember, the MLB teams run the baseball academies in the Dominican Republic and other countries. So the Dominicans get baseball fundamentals from MLB teams.

I hope my Dominican friends do not get upset for the above comments. I am sure the same thing will happen to Cuba once the Cuban market opens up.

sandlot
01-08-2006, 09:58 PM
He lives in Miami in the off-season and has two dogs (one was given to him by Jose Canseco), one in each of his homes.It doesn't require the nose of a bloodhound (or German Shepherd, or Lab) to smell the start of another conspiratorial thread.

Licey Fan
01-09-2006, 07:17 AM
I'm dominican, but still I don't think people should make such a hassle over which country you represent in a baseball tournament... I mean, is not like you are representing the other country's army in a war... THAT WOULD BE A TRAITOR, and in that case it would've made sense his comments about "i don't wan't to dishonor either"

In baseball, is pretty simple, play for one... People's upset here in DR, but the media has a lot to do with it... People are giving it less importance has time passes

Mattingly
01-09-2006, 12:34 PM
Both of his parents are dominican read his biography. and he got the fundamentals in the Dominican Rep as a kid. thats where he learn to play baseball. and if it wasnt for his Dominican heritage he wouldnt be a baseball player today, thats for sure.
Can you please provide a link for this biography of his? I see you posted two lengthy articles, but I'd prefer to see a link.

I think you're confusing one's Dominican heritage to one's having been introduced to baseball in the Dominican Republic, according to one of the articles you'd posted. If the former were the case, as you claim, then only people born there would've ever have played baseball. Please see the Hall of Fame website and you'll see that there are people from many countries who've played and excelled.

As to the latter--his having been introduced to baseball when in the DR--then I'll give him credit for getting his start over there, but I'm not sure how much he played there. I'd have to go through the link and see if it was occasional or regular. From ages 4-8, especially with schoolwork and family time involved, I'm not sure how much baseball can actually be even played.