PDA

View Full Version : wooden bats label facing up?



baseball_in_hel*
06-18-2007, 12:28 PM
I heard something a while ago that with wooden bats you should have the label facing up or something so that the grains are going the right way I think so it doesn't break. Can anybody clear this up? Is the label facing up or away from you or which way, does it really matter, and why?

Thanks.

MrSurprise
06-18-2007, 12:52 PM
When a wooden bat is made the label is placed in a precise spot so that if you hit a ball with the label facing straight up or straight down the ball will hit the hardest part of the bat. You want the ball to hit where the grains are closest together, so if you look at your bat and put the label straight up or down then you will see to the sides the grains are closest together... The best way to explain this is take about 10 envelopes and hit the side of the on your hand... notice how your hand bends the envelopes back and your hand goes through them... now take those same envelopes and hit the edges (where they are closest together) on your hand and notice how much stronger the envelopes are and that they keep your hand from going through them... Make since... there is a picture on this board some where... i will try to find it...

there is a link on the same topic...
http://www.baseball-fever.com/showthread.php?t=24217

MrSurprise
06-18-2007, 12:57 PM
here is a picture I was looking at...

Drill
06-18-2007, 09:50 PM
Does this bring back memories as a kid.



drill

redbird73
06-18-2007, 11:10 PM
I've seen a lot of guys get up to bat and make sure their labels are facing up....

redbird73
06-18-2007, 11:12 PM
I thought it was just one of those rituals that they go threw at bat, now I know there is more to it.Thanks.

virg
06-18-2007, 11:29 PM
I heard something a while ago that with wooden bats you should have the label facing up or something so that the grains are going the right way I think so it doesn't break. Can anybody clear this up? Is the label facing up or away from you or which way, does it really matter, and why?

Thanks.

The label ritual assures that you'll hit with a stiffer more rigid side of the bat. Hit the wrong way; the bat flexes and you can feel it give a bit. It was commonly believed (1940s- '70s) that using a wrong side caused breakage: not so, just deadened contact.

Jake Patterson
06-19-2007, 06:49 AM
Does this bring back memories as a kid.

drill

It sure does although it would have looked a little more familiar with a big screw sticking out of it and black electrical wrapped around it.
Drill

scorekeeper
06-19-2007, 02:17 PM
The label ritual assures that you'll hit with a stiffer more rigid side of the bat. Hit the wrong way; the bat flexes and you can feel it give a bit. It was commonly believed (1940s- '70s) that using a wrong side caused breakage: not so, just deadened contact.

If you’re saying that its no easier to break a piece of wood no matter how pressure is applied relative to the grain, I’ve got some serious money I’d like to bet that you can’t prove that one with science.

virg
06-19-2007, 02:45 PM
If you’re saying that its no easier to break a piece of wood no matter how pressure is applied relative to the grain, I’ve got some serious money I’d like to bet that you can’t prove that one with science.

Bet someone else. Yes wood does break easier in that plane. But hit on the sweet spot it's strong enough. The problem then is that it gives and flexes so much that I could feel it give, and I thought the ball lost something.

scorekeeper
06-19-2007, 03:47 PM
Bet someone else. Yes wood does break easier in that plane. But hit on the sweet spot it's strong enough. The problem then is that it gives and flexes so much that I could feel it give, and I thought the ball lost something.

You “THOUGHT” the ball lost something? ;)

Its OK that you think something is true or false, but when you accept things without proof, you’ve opened yourself up to problems down the road.

If there was a flex, and I’m sure there is to at least some degree, when the ball is hit during that flex makes all the difference in the world. FI, if the bat head is lagging behind the hands, it might “feel” as though the ball had lost something compared to how it would feel if the head were catching up to the hands.

That would be like cracking a bull whip where the tip is actually breaking the sound barrier, which is what causes the crack. The same effect can be felt in golf, and actually seen in high speed film. Its why old geezers tend to use whippy shafts. They can’t generate the hand speed any more, so they let the shaft of the club bend more to make up for the lack of hand speed.

The result is normally less control, but more distance. The young guys can’t do it because their hands are so fast, they’d bend a whippy shaft so much, it would never catch up. Its gets pretty danged complicated when you start taking into consideration torque, velocities, materials, etc.

But in the long run, if someone could actually bend a bat, depending on when they hit the ball in the swing, it could feel “dead”, but it might also really feel super sweet.

virg
06-19-2007, 06:17 PM
Angels can fly because they take themselves lightly.

J-MAC
06-21-2007, 01:09 PM
label up is correct. Then again this rule does not apply to composite bats as i was told by the sales person who sold me my kr3.