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Milwaukee T
06-03-2008, 08:43 PM
Can someone please tell me why baseball hasn't done more to honour this man as much as #42? Because he started his journey a couple of weeks later, Doby didn't have the same problems to deal with? I would suggest that he had it harder being in the AL and being on his own the entire time without having the benefit of having people looking out for him at all.

I see all the 42s and just wish we would see more done for a great player that played a full career. How many people remeber that not only was he the second black player in the majors; he was also the second black manager in the majors as well as the second black player in Japan?

For a guy that was as good as he was and was always at the front end of the curve, it saddens me to think he is left a level below 42 simply because 'second' is associated with each of his accomplishments.

disgrig
06-06-2008, 03:46 AM
Unfortunately, it falls into the category of no one cares as much about the 2nd man to walk on the moon. That is a shame because, I agree, MLB could do more to honor Larry Doby. He went through many trials and tribulations as a pioneer in his own right and he definitely has not gotten the recognition Jackie Robinson has gotten in recent years. I am not advocating taking anything away from Robinson but I think more could be done to honor Larry Doby (and more by all of baseball--not just the Cleveland Indians).

Paul Wendt
06-06-2008, 06:11 AM
This is the 60th anniversary of Cleveland's last world series championship and Doby's rookie year, we would say today. He was not one of the leading rookies for award balloting purposes. Was he considered a rookie then? Only 33 plate appearances in 1947 but 29 games (more than 20% of the season) and plenty of time on the roster, I presume.

1948 Award Voting, Rookie of the Year (http://www.baseball-reference.com/awards/awards_1948.shtml#MLroy)

EdTarbusz
06-06-2008, 09:17 AM
Doby wasn't considered a rookie in 1948. A big question for the Indians at the beginning of 1948 was what to do with Doby, since they had more outfielders on their roster then usual (I think they had eight OFs). I think that Boudreau had resented having Doby on the team in 1947 and wanted to farm him out in 1948, that said, I don't think Bousreau resented having Doby because Doby was black, but becauseVeeck didn't consult Boudreau about the Doby signing (Veeck would not make this mistake with the Satchel Paige signing). Doby got off to a horrible start in 1948, including (according to some sources) getting hit on the head by a fly ball on opening day. Doby seemed destined for Baltimore, and then in May of 1948, he hit one of the longest HRs in the history of Griffith Stadium, and that seemed to turn his season around.

EdTarbusz
06-06-2008, 09:43 AM
Unfortunately, it falls into the category of no one cares as much about the 2nd man to walk on the moon. That is a shame because, I agree, MLB could do more to honor Larry Doby. He went through many trials and tribulations as a pioneer in his own right and he definitely has not gotten the recognition Jackie Robinson has gotten in recent years. I am not advocating taking anything away from Robinson but I think more could be done to honor Larry Doby (and more by all of baseball--not just the Cleveland Indians).

I think it has more to do with the fact that while Robinson transcended baseball, Doby didn't. Doby was both small spoken and surly which didn't get him more positive media attention.

Paul Wendt
06-06-2008, 03:52 PM
Doby wasn't considered a rookie in 1948. A big question for the Indians at the beginning of 1948 was what to do with Doby, since they had more outfielders on their roster then usual (I think they had eight OFs).
Oh, yes, now I recall that squad is famous for its effect on Minnie Minoso. (signed 1948, played a few games in 1949 and a few in 1951 before shipping to Chicago)

EdTarbusz
06-06-2008, 09:05 PM
Oh, yes, now I recall that squad is famous for its effect on Minnie Minoso. (signed 1948, played a few games in 1949 and a few in 1951 before shipping to Chicago)

In 1948 Veeck hired Abe Saperstein as an advisor for hiring black talent. Al Smith was one of the first players that Saperstein had a hand in signing.

The Indians OF in 1948: Dale Mitchell, Larry Doby, Thurman Tucker, Hank Edwards, Hal Peck, Bob Kennedy (acquired in trade with White Sox), Allie Clark, Walt Judnich and Pat Seerey (traded to White Sox).

disgrig
06-07-2008, 04:31 AM
A big question for the Indians at the beginning of 1948 was what to do with Doby, since they had more outfielders on their roster then usual (I think they had eight OFs). I think that Boudreau had resented having Doby on the team in 1947 and wanted to farm him out in 1948, that said, I don't think Bousreau resented having Doby because Doby was black, but becauseVeeck didn't consult Boudreau about the Doby signing (Veeck would not make this mistake with the Satchel Paige signing).

I read in one of the old newspapers that there rumors of Larry Doby being sold to a team in Pacific Coast League near the end of the 1947 season. If this had taken place, Doby's name may have been really lost to history. There is a chance he would be in the same category as Willard Brown.