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howiek
12-13-2008, 02:46 PM
I've been searching ebay for common lots. Old cards for TTM's. Anything
Pre-1980.
This one person was selling a lot of 1990 Donruss and called it vintage.
I guess I don't consider 1990 vintage. Because it doesn't seem that
long ago.
Just wondering what you guys thing

xholdourownx
12-13-2008, 02:58 PM
I've been searching ebay for common lots. Old cards for TTM's. Anything
Pre-1980.
This one person was selling a lot of 1990 Donruss and called it vintage.
I guess I don't consider 1990 vintage. Because it doesn't seem that
long ago.
Just wondering what you guys thing

When I think vintage, I think Pre-1970 or so. Some of the things from 70 on seem almost too current. But that's just me.

AutographCollector
12-13-2008, 03:25 PM
When I think vintage I think pre 1970 just like xholdourownx does.

Dalkowski110
12-13-2008, 03:51 PM
I actually draw the line at pre-1975, since Topps started making serious changes to their trademark and how they sold cards in 1975.

EdTarbusz
12-13-2008, 04:27 PM
I tend to think of anything that is pre-Bowman as vintage.

VIBaseball
12-13-2008, 05:11 PM
I actually draw the line at pre-1975, since Topps started making serious changes to their trademark and how they sold cards in 1975.

Was 1974 the last year Topps sold cards in series throughout the year? That was the real reason for the rarity of "high numbers" and many rookie cards -- the kids lost interest toward the end of the year and didn't buy as many packs.

ipitch
12-13-2008, 05:27 PM
I've never used "vintage" for baseball cards since it's so vague. Why be vague when you can use the exact year?

Dalkowski110
12-13-2008, 05:27 PM
No, the last year they issued in Series (until they started doing it again in the 1990's) was 1973. 1974 was also the first year that factory sets were sold via J.C. Penny (although sales were disappointing and factory sets weren't issued for another couple years). However, larger cellophane packs were introduced in 1975, and the trademark was also changed from "TCG Ptd. in USA" to "Topps Company, Inc." That may not seem important, but I'm almost positive that Topps corporately restructured in late 1974/1975. 1975 Topps for the first time also lacks the "gimmick" type inserts that were so common in the 1960's and early 1970's that disappeared in the mid 1970's.

"I've never used 'vintage' for baseball cards since it's so vague."

Nor have I, BUT if I had to pin down a year, like I said, 1974 would be the dividing line.

SteveJRogers
12-13-2008, 07:26 PM
Heh, I would suspect that seller doesn't have a darn clue about the hobby and just slapped "Vintage" because the cards are nearly 20 years old!

The SCD mega card guide lists everything prior to Fleer's and Donruss' MLB debut in 1981 as "Vintage" and everything since as "Modern" if that helps makes something "official" since I've never seen actual ages given to trading cards the way comic books are broken up into ages (Golden Age (mid 1930s through early WWII), Post Golden Age (WWII through early 1950s, Comics Code era), Silver Age (Mid 1950s through the early 1970s (Debuts of the Barry Allen Flash at DC and The Fantastic Four at Marvel are the official starting points), Bronze Age (1970s through mid 80s. I'm guessing the death of Spider-Man's girlfriend and a major villain is Marvel's official start point), Modern Age present day).

Extra Innings
12-13-2008, 07:27 PM
I've been searching ebay for common lots. Old cards for TTM's. Anything
Pre-1980.
This one person was selling a lot of 1990 Donruss and called it vintage.
I guess I don't consider 1990 vintage. Because it doesn't seem that
long ago.
Just wondering what you guys thing



I consider cards pre-'80 vintage because that was before the big baseball card boom and most of the cards from the '70s are still fairly collectible.

I've heard people call cards from '88-'91 vintage too, but thats just not right, imo.

SteveJRogers
12-13-2008, 08:20 PM
I've heard people call cards from '88-'91 vintage too, but thats just not right, imo.

Yeah, like I said, probably people that really don't know much about the hobby and just stick the label "vintage" on anything that is more than 15 years old. Most likely so they can get people to pay more than it is actually worth. :dismay:

Mike D.
12-13-2008, 09:57 PM
As others have said, I have always thought of "vintage" as before 1981, when Fleer and Donruss started producing cards. Of course, it's all rather arbitrary, I guess. A lot has to do with who's doing the defining, their age, and how long they've been collecting.