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Thread: HS Freshman catcher

  1. #1

    HS Freshman catcher

    Would appreciate any thoughts on my son's technique. His pop times are as of today...2.25 best, most 2.3-2.5, worst 2.7. Would love to get them down to 2.15-2.35 by tryouts. I think its in body mechanics. What do you think?

    There's a vid of receiving too.

    Throws..

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H7NK3L_gg7s
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uaS_EeWN58E
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s8qF8SxxtNI
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9_yQEPtm7Uo

    Receiving....

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7XQYKFmKq6M

  2. #2
    I just took a quick glance but here is one thing that will help. Watch how as he receives the pitch, his glove travels outward towards the ball--creating separation between his glove and his throwing hand. Picture this with me... So his glove reaches out, he catches the ball, he has to bring either the glove backwards towards his hand and throw OR he has to bring his hand to the glove then bring the ball back and throw.

    Work on him catching the ball deeper with the glove and having his bare hand close to the glove for the transfer. Think about it...the pitch is already traveling at a pretty fast rate. Use that precious time to let the pitch travel a tad bit longer, and then quickly transfer and throw instead of "going to get the ball" with the glove hand.

    EDIT: Keep in mind, this is for a good pitch within the frame of the catcher's body. Naturally, you would have to extend the glove to catch if the pitch is a fastball low and away for example. Therefore, the action will be slower, and that's why it's harder to throw out a runner when a "bad" pitch is thrown (with the exception of a fastball up, for obvious reasons).

    I guess the best way to say this is to let the hands work as a unit. Don't let one get too far away from the other when receiving/transferring.
    Last edited by Matt; 12-28-2010 at 12:50 PM.

  3. #3
    I'm surprised he's even in the 2.3 - 2.5 range. From the videos it did not look like that. He must have a strong arm.

    His transfer from glove to arm is slow in my opinion and his throwing motion takes too long as well.

    Work on doing medicine and agility training that focuses on improving pop times. I'm not an expert in catcher training so I'll leave that to the others.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by next ortiz View Post
    I'm surprised he's even in the 2.3 - 2.5 range. From the videos it did not look like that. He must have a strong arm.
    I agree and yes he has a strong arm. Also plays third and can really fire the ball across the corners.

  5. #5
    He gets rid of the ball quickly and efficiently.
    In all four videos his pop-to-release times were under .8 secs.
    IMO, his mechanics are sound and his pop times will drop as gets older and his throwing arm gets stronger.


    Possibly, when he cocks his throwing arm, he brings the ball behind his head? Hard to tell.
    Edited: I agree with Matt that he chases the ball somewhat.

    ____________________

    Edited to say:
    Your son gets rid of the ball in less than .8 secs.
    If his throw to second averaged 60mph while it was in the air, the ball would arrive at second base in 1.45 seconds, resulting in a pop-time of 2.25.
    My guess is that a throw that leaves the hand at 70mph has an average speed of about 60mph over 127ft.
    Last edited by skipper5; 12-28-2010 at 01:22 PM.
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  6. #6
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    St.
    I agree his times look slower than what is listed above. Are you measuring glove to glove?
    The best there is is CatchingCoach... He's been on once and awhile as he recovers.. Send him a PM.
    Jake
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  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Jake Patterson View Post
    St.
    I agree his times look slower than what is listed above. Are you measuring glove to glove?
    The best there is is CatchingCoach... He's been on once and awhile as he recovers.. Send him a PM.
    Jake
    yep....glove to glove.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by next ortiz View Post
    His transfer from glove to arm is slow in my opinion.
    I saw that too.

    Is he trying to grip the ball or just grab it and throw it?

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by skipper5 View Post
    Edited: I agree with Matt that he chases the ball somewhat.
    I don't understand what you mean. Can you explain more?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by SLBaseballDad View Post
    Would appreciate any thoughts on my son's technique. His pop times are as of today...2.25 best, most 2.3-2.5, worst 2.7. Would love to get them down to 2.15-2.35 by tryouts. I think its in body mechanics. What do you think?

    There's a vid of receiving too.

    Throws..

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H7NK3L_gg7s
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uaS_EeWN58E
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s8qF8SxxtNI
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9_yQEPtm7Uo

    Receiving....

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7XQYKFmKq6M
    Here's what Molina does on a throw down to 1B.


  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris O'Leary View Post
    Here's what Molina does on a throw down to 1B.

    Do you have the end of the clip???
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jake Patterson View Post
    Do you have the end of the clip???
    What are you interested in? The clip is through the release point.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by SLBaseballDad View Post
    There's several real good things going on... He works his set-up well with both feet pointing up the line. One thing he has to get used to as he climbs the ladder is getting "quiet" once he's set. CatchingCoach's term - I believe - is you have to disappear behind the plate. I would strongly recommend his DVD.
    "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris O'Leary View Post
    What are you interested in? The clip is through the release point.
    Throwing side leg... I wanted to see how far he rotated his his through.
    "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jake Patterson View Post
    Throwing side leg... I wanted to see how far he rotated his his through.
    What you see is what he does.

    His back leg doesn't come through or anything.

    This is a snap throw down to 1B, and not a throw down to 2B, but I don't know if that would change that much.

  16. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Chris O'Leary View Post
    Here's what Molina does on a throw down to 1B.

    love this! You wouldn't happen to have this video in real time would you Chris?

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by SLBaseballDad View Post
    love this! You wouldn't happen to have this video in real time would you Chris?
    Since this is a 60FPS gif, that's not doable.

    However, you can count the frames to see how long he is from glove to release and that will give you a sense of the time.

  18. #18
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    "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris O'Leary View Post
    Here's what Molina does on a throw down to 1B.

    One thing Molina does that I don't see talked about much is that he rolls or even flips the ball out of his glove and into his throwing hand rather than having to go in after it with his hand.

    Notice how his throwing hand is fairly open as the glove comes back to it and then closes down once the ball's in his hand.

    I can testify that this a very fast, and came up with it on my own in an attempt to get faster with my transfers, but I only get a good transfer maybe 75% of the time.

    However, I don't practice it as much as Molina does.
    Last edited by Chris O'Leary; 12-28-2010 at 02:49 PM.

  20. #20
    molina is an awesome catcher. I think he is clearly the best defensively. that guy has a cannon.

    I think what is crucial is that he catches in front of the throwing side, so that the momentum of the ball moves the glove/ball to the throwing shoulder very fast. move the glove back to the throwing hand. if the glove stays forward and you move the throwing hand forward to take it out it will be too slow.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eKxRzRbSnk4
    Last edited by dominik; 12-28-2010 at 03:42 PM.
    I think walks are overrated unless you can run. If you get a walk and put the pitcher in a stretch, that helps, but the guy who walks and can’t run, most of the time he’s clogging up the bases for somebody who can run. – Dusty Baker.

  21. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by next ortiz View Post
    His transfer from glove to arm is slow in my opinion and his throwing motion takes too long as well.
    .
    A stopwatch contradicts the perception that he's in possession of the ball for too long a time. He's consistently in possession of the ball for about .8 secs. in the video, which is a good time. If you had him throwing into a tarp exactly 10 ft. away from the catcher in his stance--which is Catchingcoach's method of evaluating catchers' release times--at 70mph the ball would arrive at the tarp in ..05 sec after release, which adds up to a total of .85 seconds from popping-the-mitt-to-popping-the-tarp. Catchingcoach's data indicates that .85 is average for a high school catcher, and this boy is NOT a HS catcher, he's only a freshman.

    CatchingCoach--

    Ball Control & Release Efficiency. To evaluate this component I use the following technique. I position the player in front of the black Jugs tarp that hangs behind home plate in our batting cage. I measure out 10 feet and draw a line. It must always be 10 feet. The player puts his toes on the line facing the black screen. The coach kneels in front of the catcher, slightly off center. The player gets into his secondary receiving position. The coach throws the “pitch”. Player completes a full speed throw into the screen. The stopwatch is started when the ball hits glove and stopped when the ball hits the screen. The player must sit on the strike and not move until the ball hits his glove as if it were an 0-2 count late in the game. Because the catcher is releasing the ball about 5 feet in front of the screen, arm strength has little to do with the time recorded on the stopwatch. The drill gives an accurate measurement of how fast the athlete gets it in the air. You can also have the catcher throw directly into the fence backstop, but I find the tarp makes a more precise sound when hit, making it easier to ensure a good clocking.

    Ave release times for High School players would be under .85 down to .78, good would be .78 down to .70, and excellent would be .69 down to .65. Below .65 is very fast for HS. For the College players in my database the average release times would be under .78 down to .70, good would be .70 down to .65, and excellent would be .65 down to .59. Below .59 is really moving. Fastest release I have ever timed at any age is a 14yr old that throws in the .49-.52 range. He is just amazing.
    Last edited by Jake Patterson; 12-28-2010 at 06:09 PM. Reason: Fixed quote
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  22. #22
    Molina begins to stand up before the ball reaches him. Is that what we teach?
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  23. #23
    I fear I may have missed something. I realized while watching the weather just now that the wind was blowing here in the Houston area 15-20 mph today. In fact he confirmed that it was right into his face.

    While common sense would say it affected the pop times, how much of an affect would it have? a tenth of a second? half that? I'm way out of my league now.

  24. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by skipper5 View Post
    Molina begins to stand up before the ball reaches him. Is that what we teach?
    Well, you know, I showed that to my son as a way to kick start the body for the throw. Not sure if its a good teach or not.

  25. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by SLBaseballDad View Post
    Well, you know, I showed that to my son as a way to kick start the body for the throw. Not sure if its a good teach or not.
    SLbaseballdad, I sent you a PM

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