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Thread: Citi Field Tickets & Concessions

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by ribant View Post
    Prove it......
    I get it, there's no factual data to back up my false claim. But using some common sense, it's foolish to think that seats in the 500's behind the plate are some of the "best seats in the house." Maybe best value, but i think if you had to choose you'd pick delta club, champions, caesars gold, and promenade club over those seats. And I didn't even get to caesars silver, metro box behind the dugouts, or even field box.

    So IN MY OPINION, your claim was inaccurate.

  2. #22
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    I was reading Zack Hample's blog and there was an interesting blog post where he takes on-field batting practice at PNC Park with season ticket holders after the regular season ended in October. They have batting practice from a pitching machine, former players on hand and some sort of meal. I would love to see season ticket holders do this at Citi Field. "Take batting practice at Citi Field, watch your line drives die at the warning track and meet Nick Evans!"

    http://snaggingbaseballs.mlblogs.com...e-at-pnc-park/
    The Mets have the best, smartest fans in baseball.

  3. #23
    Here you go, although not an article about the Mets this is proof that its them dumping tickets onto Stub Hub. Now Ticketmaster wants a piece of the action...


    Ticketmaster rolls out 'dynamic' ticket pricing

    By RYAN NAKASHIMA, AP Business Writer 1 hr 42 mins ago

    LOS ANGELES Event tickets seller Ticketmaster said Monday that it is introducing new technology to let artists and sports teams raise or lower ticket prices to reflect demand during the initial sales period a move it said will crimp the profits of scalpers and boost revenue for performers and teams.
    The technology could push up initial prices for front-row seats while reducing prices on less-desirable ones that might have gone unsold otherwise.
    Ticketmaster, a division of Live Nation Entertainment Inc., says the change should make it harder for anyone to send prices soaring by buying up all the best tickets and reselling them at substantial profit.
    "When the fan experience is not clouded by scalpers grabbing seats, or when there's more options for fans to come to a better show, that has a great impact on our business," Ticketmaster Chief Executive Nathan Hubbard said in an interview.
    The company already is testing the system, known as "dynamic pricing," with several professional baseball, basketball and hockey teams. Ticketmaster plans to roll it out at some North American venues in the middle of the summer concert season this year. A data analysis company called MarketShare helped create the pricing tool.
    The San Francisco Giants baseball team started using a dynamic pricing system created by a company called Qcue Inc. in 2009. The team found that adjusting prices in real time to reflect sales data, league standings and which opposing team was visiting helped sell more tickets.
    Qcue, which is not involved with Ticketmaster's dynamic pricing offering, now serves more than 20 teams in pro baseball, hockey, basketball and auto racing.
    Its founder and CEO, Barry Kahn, said Ticketmaster's biggest challenge is bringing the system to the music industry, where there has been a "dysfunctional relationship" between artists, their promoters, and venues.
    Since Ticketmaster's merger with Live Nation last year, however, the combined company now has all three functions under one roof, meaning the divisions should be able to work together, he said.
    StubHub, the world's largest reseller of tickets and a subsidiary of eBay Inc., said dynamic pricing for sports events has not cut into its business. Tickets that command high prices on the initial sale tend to sell at even higher prices on the resale market because they're in limited supply, according to StubHub spokesman Glenn Lehrman.
    And, when seats that aren't as good are priced even more cheaply, more tickets get sold, he said.
    "Any kind of system that leads to lower prices, that is a good thing for fans," Lehrman said.
    Live Nation's revenue fell 9 percent in 2010 as concert ticket sales dropped, even though it tried to get more people through turnstiles by cutting ticket prices. The company has said it expects global ticket sales to be flat in 2011, compared with an 8 percent decline last year, when it sold 120 million tickets.
    Live Nation shares fell 14 cents, or 1.4 percent, to close at $9.73 Monday.

  4. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by majorleads View Post
    Here you go, although not an article about the Mets this is proof that its them dumping tickets onto Stub Hub. Now Ticketmaster wants a piece of the action...


    Ticketmaster rolls out 'dynamic' ticket pricing

    By RYAN NAKASHIMA, AP Business Writer 1 hr 42 mins ago

    LOS ANGELES Event tickets seller Ticketmaster said Monday that it is introducing new technology to let artists and sports teams raise or lower ticket prices to reflect demand during the initial sales period a move it said will crimp the profits of scalpers and boost revenue for performers and teams.
    The technology could push up initial prices for front-row seats while reducing prices on less-desirable ones that might have gone unsold otherwise.
    Ticketmaster, a division of Live Nation Entertainment Inc., says the change should make it harder for anyone to send prices soaring by buying up all the best tickets and reselling them at substantial profit.
    "When the fan experience is not clouded by scalpers grabbing seats, or when there's more options for fans to come to a better show, that has a great impact on our business," Ticketmaster Chief Executive Nathan Hubbard said in an interview.
    The company already is testing the system, known as "dynamic pricing," with several professional baseball, basketball and hockey teams. Ticketmaster plans to roll it out at some North American venues in the middle of the summer concert season this year. A data analysis company called MarketShare helped create the pricing tool.
    The San Francisco Giants baseball team started using a dynamic pricing system created by a company called Qcue Inc. in 2009. The team found that adjusting prices in real time to reflect sales data, league standings and which opposing team was visiting helped sell more tickets.
    Qcue, which is not involved with Ticketmaster's dynamic pricing offering, now serves more than 20 teams in pro baseball, hockey, basketball and auto racing.
    Its founder and CEO, Barry Kahn, said Ticketmaster's biggest challenge is bringing the system to the music industry, where there has been a "dysfunctional relationship" between artists, their promoters, and venues.
    Since Ticketmaster's merger with Live Nation last year, however, the combined company now has all three functions under one roof, meaning the divisions should be able to work together, he said.
    StubHub, the world's largest reseller of tickets and a subsidiary of eBay Inc., said dynamic pricing for sports events has not cut into its business. Tickets that command high prices on the initial sale tend to sell at even higher prices on the resale market because they're in limited supply, according to StubHub spokesman Glenn Lehrman.
    And, when seats that aren't as good are priced even more cheaply, more tickets get sold, he said.
    "Any kind of system that leads to lower prices, that is a good thing for fans," Lehrman said.
    Live Nation's revenue fell 9 percent in 2010 as concert ticket sales dropped, even though it tried to get more people through turnstiles by cutting ticket prices. The company has said it expects global ticket sales to be flat in 2011, compared with an 8 percent decline last year, when it sold 120 million tickets.
    Live Nation shares fell 14 cents, or 1.4 percent, to close at $9.73 Monday.
    I don't disagree that the Mets are dumping on StubHub, but how is Ticketmasters plan to use dynamic pricing proof of that?

  5. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by foulpole View Post
    I don't disagree that the Mets are dumping on StubHub, but how is Ticketmasters plan to use dynamic pricing proof of that?
    Because in the article it mentions a team, the San Francisco Giants that have been doing this since 2009. Finally its made public that a team is actually putting tickets online that reflect current market value.

    I'm sure Mets season ticket holders would have loved this information before plucking down top dollar during the offseason. Mets knew before the season that they were going to join the many teams that have already been doing this, so in a way they were deceiving their fans. It's one thing if a fan puts a ticket on stub hub for less value, but when a team does it this now changes the entire dynamic of how they sell tickets in the future. Should be interesting next offseason if they continue to suck. Unless you're mainly going for the "tasty crab cakes," why would any fan buy season tickets next year?

  6. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by majorleads View Post
    Because in the article it mentions a team, the San Francisco Giants that have been doing this since 2009. Finally its made public that a team is actually putting tickets online that reflect current market value.

    I'm sure Mets season ticket holders would have loved this information before plucking down top dollar during the offseason. Mets knew before the season that they were going to join the many teams that have already been doing this, so in a way they were deceiving their fans. It's one thing if a fan puts a ticket on stub hub for less value, but when a team does it this now changes the entire dynamic of how they sell tickets in the future. Should be interesting next offseason if they continue to suck. Unless you're mainly going for the "tasty crab cakes," why would any fan buy season tickets next year?
    The Giants selling tix with dynamic pricing isn't a secret. Look on their web site.

  7. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by ribant View Post
    The Giants selling tix with dynamic pricing isn't a secret. Look on their web site.


    I know. You are missing the point of my original post. I've known about teams dumping tickets on stub hub and craigs list for the past 3 years and talked about this in the Citi Field thread so I posted the above article to show the fans who hadn't realized this practice occurred that they can see an actual team who is involved.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by majorleads View Post
    I know. You are missing the point of my original post. I've known about teams dumping tickets on stub hub and craigs list for the past 3 years and talked about this in the Citi Field thread so I posted the above article to show the fans who hadn't realized this practice occurred that they can see an actual team who is involved.
    Anyone have an idea what it costs a FST / mini-plan holder at renewal time? And how does it compare to the dynamic pricing of seats?

    Cheers!
    -Doug
    20-Game Saturday Plan, Prom Box 423.

  9. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by majorleads View Post
    Unless you're mainly going for the "tasty crab cakes," why would any fan buy season tickets next year?
    You just won't let it go, will you? I never said I go mainly for the crab cakes. Since this is an entire thread dedicated to ticketing and concessions, I thought it was relevant to post my experience with the food at COTD. Sorry if that disappoints you.

    As for why any fan would buy season tickets, again, you may find it perplexing but to others there are many good reasons to do so - mainly to guarantee the same seats for the entire season and to have seats that they really like. Not all fans are built alike, but for me being a fan means supporting the team through thick and thin. Clearly, that's not important to you.

  10. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by majorleads View Post
    I know. You are missing the point of my original post. I've known about teams dumping tickets on stub hub and craigs list for the past 3 years and talked about this in the Citi Field thread so I posted the above article to show the fans who hadn't realized this practice occurred that they can see an actual team who is involved.
    An actual team doesn't equal the Mets. As ribant and foulpole said, it's not proof that the Mets are involved. They may be but this isn't proof.

  11. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by majorleads View Post
    I know. You are missing the point of my original post. I've known about teams dumping tickets on stub hub and craigs list for the past 3 years and talked about this in the Citi Field thread so I posted the above article to show the fans who hadn't realized this practice occurred that they can see an actual team who is involved.
    Dumping tickets on StubHub and dynamic pring are two completely different things. If the Mets are selling on the hub, it is a cloak and dagger operation undercutting the people who buy directly from them. The Giants sell directly from their website using dynamic pricing, just as the Mets and others use tiered pricing. Dynamic pricing is open and upfront, hub-dumping is not

  12. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by foulpole View Post
    Dumping tickets on StubHub and dynamic pring are two completely different things. If the Mets are selling on the hub, it is a cloak and dagger operation undercutting the people who buy directly from them. The Giants sell directly from their website using dynamic pricing, just as the Mets and others use tiered pricing. Dynamic pricing is open and upfront, hub-dumping is not
    Excellent point.

  13. #33
    Tickets are dirt cheap and I can't wait to go once the weather warms up. Nothing better then spending a nice day at the ballpark. You can get any game in the upper deck for under 5 bucks. Why would you not go if you love baseball?
    Last edited by dpcv8; 04-19-2011 at 02:21 PM.

  14. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by johnql View Post
    You just won't let it go, will you? I never said I go mainly for the crab cakes. Since this is an entire thread dedicated to ticketing and concessions, I thought it was relevant to post my experience with the food at COTD. Sorry if that disappoints you.

    As for why any fan would buy season tickets, again, you may find it perplexing but to others there are many good reasons to do so - mainly to guarantee the same seats for the entire season and to have seats that they really like. Not all fans are built alike, but for me being a fan means supporting the team through thick and thin. Clearly, that's not important to you.
    I understand the reasons why someone would purchase season tickets, I am just questioning the wisdom of purchasing them next season when you know you can now get them on Stub Hub for a fraction of the cost.

    Question for you, say we're still rebuilding next offseason and not signing any big names, are you still going to purchase season tickets and if so, how much are you willing to pay per game? Or does cost not matter at all and you'd be OK if they just dropped the price a few dollars? Would you still purchase season tickets if you knew beforehand that they're dropping "tasty crab cakes" from the menu?

  15. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by foulpole View Post
    Dumping tickets on StubHub and dynamic pring are two completely different things. If the Mets are selling on the hub, it is a cloak and dagger operation undercutting the people who buy directly from them. The Giants sell directly from their website using dynamic pricing, just as the Mets and others use tiered pricing. Dynamic pricing is open and upfront, hub-dumping is not
    Obviously it's different when you say one does it upfront and one is deceiving. Obviously we know who is doing the deceiving. But thats not the point though. The point was to show the practice of professional teams putting tickets on the open market and selling them for whatever the market allows. This is different than tiered pricing so I have no idea why you brought that up.

  16. #36
    Quote Originally Posted by majorleads View Post
    I understand the reasons why someone would purchase season tickets, I am just questioning the wisdom of purchasing them next season when you know you can now get them on Stub Hub for a fraction of the cost.

    Question for you, say we're still rebuilding next offseason and not signing any big names, are you still going to purchase season tickets and if so, how much are you willing to pay per game? Or does cost not matter at all and you'd be OK if they just dropped the price a few dollars? Would you still purchase season tickets if you knew beforehand that they're dropping "tasty crab cakes" from the menu?
    Since I was a season ticket holder for many years at Shea, I think it's obvious that I would still buy season tickets regardless of what food was available at the ballpark. For years at Shea, I bought very little from the concession stands, just the occasional hot dog and soda/beer. I am very pleased that CF offers much better alternatives but it is not even close to a deal-breaker for me.

    As for next year, I would be fine if ticket prices were roughly the same as this year, although a little lower would be preferable. I currently pay slightly less than $50 a ticket (averaged out over 81 games) and I think that price is reasonable for the NY market. Perhaps something closer to $40-45 per ticket on average would be fairer while they rebuild but that's not enough of a difference to dissuade me from renewing. I love my seats and I do not want to go through the hassle of buying tickets game by game at the last minute.

  17. #37
    Quote Originally Posted by johnql View Post
    Since I was a season ticket holder for many years at Shea, I think it's obvious that I would still buy season tickets regardless of what food was available at the ballpark. For years at Shea, I bought very little from the concession stands, just the occasional hot dog and soda/beer. I am very pleased that CF offers much better alternatives but it is not even close to a deal-breaker for me.

    As for next year, I would be fine if ticket prices were roughly the same as this year, although a little lower would be preferable. I currently pay slightly less than $50 a ticket (averaged out over 81 games) and I think that price is reasonable for the NY market. Perhaps something closer to $40-45 per ticket on average would be fairer while they rebuild but that's not enough of a difference to dissuade me from renewing. I love my seats and I do not want to go through the hassle of buying tickets game by game at the last minute.
    The food is irrelevant, I was just kidding.

    Alright so I see that you are unique relative to most other fans, seems like convenience is your #1 reason for buying the full season plan as opposed to cost. So I guess it doesn't matter once the season starts and on Stub Hub you see the same seat in lets say sec 123 going for half the price you pay for your ticket. I get it and understand but it would really bother me if I was locked into a full season and see field level box seats by the dugout going for half of what I paid. The way I see it next season if you wanted to you could have some fun and sit in many different sections of the park for much less than what you would pay for ST. Takes 2 minutes online to purchase tickets nowadays so it's not much of an inconvenience if you'd like to save a bunch of money. With the money saved you could treat yourself to the scrumptious Citi surf and turf special every game for an entire season.

    I just go for the game itself and don't pay any attention to all the other distractions that is until I went to my first game at Citi Field. If I was designing a stadium I would get rid of the food court, stacked luxury levels that push back upper level seats and also get rid of the open concourse where fans can walk around and watch the game at the same time. Fans endlessly walking around is my biggest pet peeve.

  18. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by majorleads View Post
    The food is irrelevant, I was just kidding.

    Alright so I see that you are unique relative to most other fans, seems like convenience is your #1 reason for buying the full season plan as opposed to cost. So I guess it doesn't matter once the season starts and on Stub Hub you see the same seat in lets say sec 123 going for half the price you pay for your ticket. I get it and understand but it would really bother me if I was locked into a full season and see field level box seats by the dugout going for half of what I paid. The way I see it next season if you wanted to you could have some fun and sit in many different sections of the park for much less than what you would pay for ST. Takes 2 minutes online to purchase tickets nowadays so it's not much of an inconvenience if you'd like to save a bunch of money. With the money saved you could treat yourself to the scrumptious Citi surf and turf special every game for an entire season.

    I just go for the game itself and don't pay any attention to all the other distractions that is until I went to my first game at Citi Field. If I was designing a stadium I would get rid of the food court, stacked luxury levels that push back upper level seats and also get rid of the open concourse where fans can walk around and watch the game at the same time. Fans endlessly walking around is my biggest pet peeve.
    Yes, convenience is very important to me. Also, having the season plan makes it much easier to plan games with friends and family. We can schedule going to games weeks in advance, something that is much more difficult to do if you're waiting for discount ticket prices (often at the last minute).

  19. #39
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnql View Post
    Since I was a season ticket holder for many years at Shea, I think it's obvious that I would still buy season tickets regardless of what food was available at the ballpark. For years at Shea, I bought very little from the concession stands, just the occasional hot dog and soda/beer. I am very pleased that CF offers much better alternatives but it is not even close to a deal-breaker for me.

    As for next year, I would be fine if ticket prices were roughly the same as this year, although a little lower would be preferable. I currently pay slightly less than $50 a ticket (averaged out over 81 games) and I think that price is reasonable for the NY market. Perhaps something closer to $40-45 per ticket on average would be fairer while they rebuild but that's not enough of a difference to dissuade me from renewing. I love my seats and I do not want to go through the hassle of buying tickets game by game at the last minute.
    That is the only part of your post that bothers me. "The NY market" stuff has been an excuse used here to defend the Mets prices since at least 2006 when I joined baseball fever.

    The Phillies tickets are so much cheaper than Mets tickets, yet they share a large part of the market (the state of NJ). And does anyone think the cost of living is cheaper in Metro Boston than the NY area? I have a friend that relocated to suburban Virginia only to find out that market around Spotsylvania VA was much higher than where she lived in Warwick NY. The Nats charge a lot less than the Mets. I have relatives in Moraga CA, and relatives in Palos Verde CA and their cost of living is much higher than mine, yet Dodgers, Angels, Giants and A's tickets, even Padres too, cost much less than NY.

    The NY Yankees are 'the NY market' as far as pricing goes. Same with the Knicks and Rangers. The Mets, Isles and Nets are not on that tier. They are all on some "sub tier" where tickets should not be priced as high as the others.

  20. #40
    Quote Originally Posted by majorleads View Post
    Obviously it's different when you say one does it upfront and one is deceiving. Obviously we know who is doing the deceiving. But thats not the point though. The point was to show the practice of professional teams putting tickets on the open market and selling them for whatever the market allows. This is different than tiered pricing so I have no idea why you brought that up.
    You are claiming that the Mets are flooding the secondary market with heavily discounted tickets. This may be true, and there is evidence to support this claim, but the Giants ARE NOT flooding the secondary market. Their primary sales are based on fluctuating prices, while the Mets primary sales are based on fixed prices. I fail to see how the Giants fluctuating price structure for their primary sales is concrete proof that the Mets are flooding the secondary market.

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