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Thread: Who's your favorite mediocre baseball player?

  1. #41
    Barry Bonnell, nice guy. Love the Oscar Gamble post. I'll throw in Roy White, Glen Hubbard, and Ryan Spilbourghs.

  2. #42
    Quote Originally Posted by Iso7x View Post
    Barry Bonnell, nice guy. Love the Oscar Gamble post. I'll throw in Roy White, Glen Hubbard, and Ryan Spilbourghs.
    Roy White mediocre? You have high standards, my friend.

  3. #43
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    You want mediocre, but memorable - at least for Expos fans in the Jarry Park days.

    John Bo-ca-be-lla!
    Dave Kent

  4. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by wrgptfan View Post
    You want mediocre, but memorable - at least for Expos fans in the Jarry Park days.

    John Bo-ca-be-lla!
    Wow...as I read this, I could hear my dad's voice calling that name out, followed by him laughing. He loved to hear the PA announcer call that name.
    He's been gone a dozen years now, it was nice to hear him again.

  5. #45
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    Once we longterm fans reach middle age, we have a few dozen names to list on something like this. One of the more recent names would be Kirk Rueter.

    As a righthander with nearly nothing exceptional in his repertoire, Rueter won games wayyyyy beyond what anyone would expect. He was a major overachiever with mediocre talent, IMO. His fastball was fantastically average, if you get my drift. The rest of his arsenal was average as well. All he did was win games, with a career W-L record of over .600 over 10 + years. Pitching for the Giants would not explain his ability to win.

    Someone already mentioned Craig Counsell. Other names off of the top of my head would include Tony Solaita, in the late 1970s. There was a game I attended which I remember him winning with a late game homer.
    Last edited by abolishthedh; 04-11-2012 at 12:56 PM.
    Catfish Hunter, RIP. Mark Fidrych, RIP. Skip Caray, RIP. Tony Gwynn, #19, RIP

    A fanatic is someone who can't change his mind and won't change the subject. -- Winston Churchill.

    Experience is the hardest teacher. She gives the test first and the lesson later. -- Dan Quisenberry.

  6. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dude Paskert View Post
    Wow...as I read this, I could hear my dad's voice calling that name out, followed by him laughing. He loved to hear the PA announcer call that name.
    He's been gone a dozen years now, it was nice to hear him again.
    I am so glad that I could bring back a happy memory of your times with your dad. Isn't that what baseball is all about - passing on memories from generation to generation? And the announcer who made Bocabella "famous" was Claude Mouton.
    Dave Kent

  7. #47
    Welcome back, Dave!!! Great to see you back after all these years.

  8. #48
    John Lowenstein

  9. #49
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    Kevin Youkilis

  10. #50
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    Terry Harmon the Phillies utiltyman from the 70's. Somehow I have every baseball card made of him.
    "(Shoeless Joe Jackson's fall from grace is one of the real tragedies of baseball. I always thought he was more sinned against than sinning." -- Connie Mack

    "I have the ultimate respect for Whitesox fans. They were as miserable as the Cubs and Redsox fans ever were but always had the good decency to keep it to themselves. And when they finally won the World Series, they celebrated without annoying every other fan in the country."--Jim Caple, ESPN (Jan. 12, 2011)

  11. #51
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    Historically - Herman Franks and Sal Yvars, because of The Polo Grounds in 1951.

    Players I watched as a kid? Rex Hudler, Ken Reitz,

    Players who I watched come through AAA when I had a good friend working for the team, met them, and got lots of tickets from them after they made it to the bigs? Brian Barber, Tim Costo
    "Herman Franks to Sal Yvars to Bobby Thomson. Ralph Branca to Bobby Thomson to Helen Rita... cue Russ Hodges."

  12. #52
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    Among the Dodgers of my youth, Lee Lacy was considered average by many but has some skills that did not always show up in the box score. He and Joe Ferguson bounced back and forth off the roster and I always thought the team was better off with these guys than without.

    On the pitching side, the Dodgers always made it a point to get rid of anyone who management thought was just average. Often times they would blossom somewhere else. See Rick Rhoden, Dave Stewart and Rick Sutcliffe for more information on this. As far as pitchers who really were average but managed to stick around for a little while Alejandro Pena comes to mind only for unrealized potential.
    Your Second Base Coach
    Garvey, Lopes, Russell, and Cey started 833 times and the Dodgers went 498-335, for a .598 winning percentage. Thatís equal to a team going 97-65 over a season. On those occasions when at least one of them missed his start, the Dodgers were 306-267-1, which is a .534 clip. That works out to a team going 87-75. So having all four of them added 10 wins to the Dodgers per year.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p5hCIvMule0

  13. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by SavoyBG View Post
    Here's mine:

    Attachment 106868
    I wouldn't call Oscar Gamble 'mediocre'. he actually had a career 127 OPS+..about the same as Jim Rice. He never played a full season, but the time he did play, he was a really good hitter. In 1979 he only played 100 games, but produced a 187 OPS+. In 1977 he played 137 games and had a 162 OPS+.

  14. #54

    Snakes on the bathroom floor

    Quote Originally Posted by Second Base Coach View Post
    Among the Dodgers of my youth, Lee Lacy was considered average by many but has some skills that did not always show up in the box score. He and Joe Ferguson bounced back and forth off the roster and I always thought the team was better off with these guys than without.

    On the pitching side, the Dodgers always made it a point to get rid of anyone who management thought was just average. Often times they would blossom somewhere else. See Rick Rhoden, Dave Stewart and Rick Sutcliffe for more information on this. As far as pitchers who really were average but managed to stick around for a little while Alejandro Pena comes to mind only for unrealized potential.
    Exactly so. After years of therapy, I had finally freed myself from memories of the Stewart-Honeycut trade, and now they come flooding back. You're saying that the above guys were not actually mediocre, and I heartily agree.

  15. #55
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    It would have to be Dusty Rhodes for me. In all the years he had with the Giants, 1954 stood out like a beacon- it seemed he always did something to help the team win a game that year, whether as a pinch hitter or playing in the outfield to give Monte Irvin a rest. And what a World Series! He never had a year like that in the majors before 1954, or after 1954 as well.

    I was lucky enough to meet him about ten years ago and for some reason the two of us hit it off- I guess it might have been because we both spent time in Staten Island or because we both sold cars for a living. I was a lifer in that business until a few years ago, but he only did it for a short time after he retired. He told me once, "They just had me there for my name. Hell, I couldn't have sold an ashtray to Edward R. Murrow." (LOL)

    He was always a million laughs regardless of whatever we talked about, and we exchanged Christmas cards for several years. Those are prized possesions, and yes, you'd have to shoot me to get them. (lol) He always holds a place in my heart, and, of course, if it hadn't been for him, my beloved Giants wouldn't have won the Series in '54.
    Last edited by chinese home run; 04-16-2012 at 02:45 PM. Reason: spelling

  16. #56
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    That's an hilarious ancedote chinese HR

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