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Thread: Youth Phenoms

  1. #81
    To Dom's point, 5 of the top 10 hardest throwers in the majors are 6' or below (and usually a pitcher listed at 6' in the majors is probably more like 5'10"):
    http://hardballtalk.nbcsports.com/20...rdest-thrower/

  2. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by d-mac View Post
    I have mentioned a 10 year old in our area that is off the charts in just about every category. Here is a small blurb about him.

    http://www.sequoyahcountytimes.com/s...a4bcf6878.html

    Now here is my question. If you were the parent of a kid that can throw 70+ at 10 years old, how would you handle the situation? Would you put him on a national team, would you play league and hire a pitching coach, would you just let him develop naturally, etc.? Just curious of everyone's thoughts.
    My oldest was clocked throwing 69 mph when he was 10. At the state LL 9/10 all-star tournament he threw two no-hitters. We never signed him up for any elite teams. He played LL in the Spring and on travel teams with his friends in Fall. We kept a watch on how much he was pitched. Despite our efforts he still had issues with an irritated growth plate due to how hard he threw. We shut down his pitching at age 12, and he did band exercises regularly. He's just starting to pitch again as a Freshman. He currently throws mid-80s and he's far from done growing according to the doctor. (he's 6'3", but weighs only 150). We still keep an eye on his shoulder to make sure the issues don't come back. The orthopedic doctor said the good news is that once the growth plate is closed, his shoulder looks great. I don't see any reason to make a big deal out of a 10-year-old. I've learned it's a long journey.

  3. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by dominik View Post
    well height is important but not everything. there are plenty of 6"4 guys who throw 87 and then there is tim collins who is 5"7 and throws 95. lincecum is 5"11 and kimbrel who throws upper 90s is also like that.

    the most important thing is really how explosive you are (fast twitch muscles or whatever that means). height is only part of what power is.
    The point I was trying to make is many preteen early bloomers grow up to be not so big duds. I didn't say there are shorter players who aren't successful.

  4. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by mcloven View Post
    To Dom's point, 5 of the top 10 hardest throwers in the majors are 6' or below (and usually a pitcher listed at 6' in the majors is probably more like 5'10"):
    http://hardballtalk.nbcsports.com/20...rdest-thrower/
    This is getting way off point (see last post). But do the research on the number of 6'1" and taller MLB pitchers versus 6' and below. It's not even close.

  5. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by azmatsfan View Post
    My oldest was clocked throwing 69 mph when he was 10. At the state LL 9/10 all-star tournament he threw two no-hitters. We never signed him up for any elite teams. He played LL in the Spring and on travel teams with his friends in Fall. We kept a watch on how much he was pitched. Despite our efforts he still had issues with an irritated growth plate due to how hard he threw. We shut down his pitching at age 12, and he did band exercises regularly. He's just starting to pitch again as a Freshman. He currently throws mid-80s and he's far from done growing according to the doctor. (he's 6'3", but weighs only 150). We still keep an eye on his shoulder to make sure the issues don't come back. The orthopedic doctor said the good news is that once the growth plate is closed, his shoulder looks great. I don't see any reason to make a big deal out of a 10-year-old. I've learned it's a long journey.
    I'll bet your son weighs at least 180 when he graduates. Then in college he'll put on twenty pounds of muscle from the training.

  6. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by pcarnette View Post
    I'm curious. What are some specific things you see about these kids that tell you they don't project very well as the get older?
    Thinking back I would estimate that less than 10% of the young phenoms I have seen in both basketball and baseball continued to develop ahead of their peers into HS. Others simply caught up or they hit their developmental ceiling very young. JMHO
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  7. #87
    72 from a 10yo is amazing. However, it's obvious he's still almost useless as a pitcher because he has no control. That's probably a good thing though, after seeing his picture, I'm agreeing with CO from what we can see. Still, even if he had amazing accuracy, I would use him probably less than my other pitchers. 72mph on a 10yo arm is bad news, IMO. I don't believe, for one second, that he's so far an advanced maturer that his growth plates aren't still open at that age.

  8. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by clayadams View Post
    72 from a 10yo is amazing. However, it's obvious he's still almost useless as a pitcher because he has no control. That's probably a good thing though, after seeing his picture, I'm agreeing with CO from what we can see. Still, even if he had amazing accuracy, I would use him probably less than my other pitchers. 72mph on a 10yo arm is bad news, IMO. I don't believe, for one second, that he's so far an advanced maturer that his growth plates aren't still open at that age.
    No matter how far physically advanced a ten year old might be his growth plates are open and susceptible to serious damage. I saw three local kids have surgery by the time they were twelve because they were "team on my back" studs in 10U. None of them were good enough to play high school ball. When talking about preteen early bloomers we're not talking about men. They are still boys with open growth plates with growing to do even if it's only a couple more inches.

  9. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by mcloven View Post
    To Dom's point, 5 of the top 10 hardest throwers in the majors are 6' or below (and usually a pitcher listed at 6' in the majors is probably more like 5'10"):
    http://hardballtalk.nbcsports.com/20...rdest-thrower/
    Yep. Bartolo Colon is listed as 5'11". I'm taller than he is, but I'm 5'11", not 6'

  10. #90
    Quote Originally Posted by azmatsfan View Post
    My oldest was clocked throwing 69 mph when he was 10. At the state LL 9/10 all-star tournament he threw two no-hitters. We never signed him up for any elite teams. He played LL in the Spring and on travel teams with his friends in Fall. We kept a watch on how much he was pitched. Despite our efforts he still had issues with an irritated growth plate due to how hard he threw. We shut down his pitching at age 12, and he did band exercises regularly. He's just starting to pitch again as a Freshman. He currently throws mid-80s and he's far from done growing according to the doctor. (he's 6'3", but weighs only 150). We still keep an eye on his shoulder to make sure the issues don't come back. The orthopedic doctor said the good news is that once the growth plate is closed, his shoulder looks great. I don't see any reason to make a big deal out of a 10-year-old. I've learned it's a long journey.
    That is the hard part for us parents, patience.

    I'm impressed you shut down his pitching for a few years. The temptation to have him be seen as a hard thrower can be too much for some.

  11. #91
    Quote Originally Posted by tg643 View Post
    No matter how far physically advanced a ten year old might be his growth plates are open and susceptible to serious damage. I saw three local kids have surgery by the time they were twelve because they were "team on my back" studs in 10U. None of them were good enough to play high school ball. When talking about preteen early bloomers we're not talking about men. They are still boys with open growth plates with growing to do even if it's only a couple more inches.
    Exactly.

    Kids need to be watched carefully since they are not mature yet to do it themselves.

    Unfortunately some parents ruin their kids because they want the pat on the back for how much of a stud pitcher their kid is.

    My 14 y.o. has just started picking up a baseball after being off since August 1. I'm constantly asking how his arm feels after throwing the ball. He knows to shut it down after the first sign of shoulder or arm pain.

  12. #92
    Quote Originally Posted by clayadams View Post
    I don't believe, for one second, that he's so far an advanced maturer that his growth plates aren't still open at that age.
    I agree. Also, he looks really big in that picture. He is probably around 5'2", 100-110 lbs, he is far from physically mature.

  13. #93
    Quote Originally Posted by d-mac View Post
    I agree. Also, he looks really big in that picture. He is probably around 5'2", 100-110 lbs, he is far from physically mature.
    From the picture, I'm guessing he's biologically 13-plus-a-day.

    If your son was a 5-2 105lb. just-turned-13 yr old, who was biologically just-turned-13yo, and he could cruise at 70mph, would you limit his innings ? (let's assume he throws a lot of strikes).

    By "limit his innings", I mean erring on the side of less than those of conservative ASMI-type guidlines.

    (I would.)

    I hope his parents don't read my post, because really it's none of my darned business.
    Last edited by skipper5; 12-08-2012 at 10:41 AM.
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  14. #94
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    Quote Originally Posted by d-mac View Post
    I agree. Also, he looks really big in that picture. He is probably around 5'2", 100-110 lbs, he is far from physically mature.
    My son was 5'2, 100 when he was thirteen. Now he's 6'2", 190.

  15. #95
    Quote Originally Posted by tg643 View Post
    My son was 5'2, 100 when he was thirteen. Now he's 6'2", 190.
    I understand, but judging from this kids parents, he is on track to be 6'4 220.

  16. #96
    Well the temptation is always there.

    My son is 14 and is 5'-11, 190 lbs with little fat. He's on track to be at least as tall as his brother, 6'-4".

  17. #97
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    Quote Originally Posted by skipper5 View Post
    From the picture, I'm guessing he's biologically 13-plus-a-day.

    If your son was a 5-2 105lb. just-turned-13 yr old, who was biologically just-turned-13yo, and he could cruise at 70mph, would you limit his innings ? (let's assume he throws a lot of strikes).

    By "limit his innings", I mean erring on the side of less than those of conservative ASMI-type guidlines.

    (I would.)

    I hope his parents don't read my post, because really it's none of my darned business.
    My son was his size and threw upper 60's at thirteen. I did limit his innings became he was pitching from 60 feet at that size. I wouldn't limit the kid's innings. But I wouldn't allow a glory hound coach to ride his arm to victory. If he was my kid at ten he would only throw two innings per week and three at eleven. It may be a blessing for this kid's future that he lacks control right now. It keeps him off the mound.

    I wasn't trying to protect my son's arm like it was a commodities future with a payoff. I was protecting his health. He threw 87 his senior year of high school. There were mid majors interested in having him pitch. He wanted to be a position player. He's bigger than high school now. But he hasn't been gunned from the mound in two years.
    Last edited by tg643; 12-08-2012 at 12:04 PM.

  18. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by d-mac View Post
    I have mentioned a 10 year old in our area that is off the charts in just about every category. Here is a small blurb about him.

    http://www.sequoyahcountytimes.com/s...a4bcf6878.html

    Now here is my question. If you were the parent of a kid that can throw 70+ at 10 years old, how would you handle the situation? Would you put him on a national team, would you play league and hire a pitching coach, would you just let him develop naturally, etc.? Just curious of everyone's thoughts.
    Move him to SS and let him just close games. When he is a sophomore or junior in high school, then start pitching him as a starter.

  19. #99
    Quote Originally Posted by HYP View Post
    Move him to SS and let him just close games. When he is a sophomore or junior in high school, then start pitching him as a starter.
    HYP,
    Well stated. I'm with you.
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  20. #100
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    Quote Originally Posted by HYP View Post
    Move him to SS and let him just close games. When he is a sophomore or junior in high school, then start pitching him as a starter.
    Great advice!
    "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
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