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Thread: Eddie Feigner: The King and His Court

  1. #1
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    Eddie Feigner: The King and His Court

    A neat old film clip from 1959. According to Eddie Feigner he turned downed down "several big league baseball offers" (time 4:10). Is this really true? Did Eddie Feigner play baseball when he was younger? I can't find any info on his earlier life. In a 1967 exhibition at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, Mr. Feigner faced Willie Mays, Roberto Clemente, Brooks Robinson, Willie McCovey, Maury Wills and Harmon Killebrew and struck out all six in succession.


    Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

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    If you've (anybody) never played windmill softball, I highly recommend it. My stepfather was a decent pitcher, but his brother was off the charts good. He was sniped many times to help win a title for some of the local teams here.

    I like windmill, and played it while playing baseball. The toughest thing was adjusting to the total different release points.
    "Chuckie doesn't take on 2-0. Chuckie's hackin'." - Chuck Carr two days prior to being released by the Milwaukee Brewers

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    A couple years ago I posted a video clip of Jennie Finch pitching to several major leaguer and striking out quite a few. Most took it in stride. when A-Rod saw how fast she pitches he told her her would step in the box against her but wouldn't swing. What a wuss. Unfortunately, the video was subsequently removed by youtube.
    Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

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  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Honus Wagner Rules View Post
    A neat old film clip from 1959. According to Eddie Feigner he turned downed down "several big league baseball offers" (time 4:10). Is this really true? Did Eddie Feigner play baseball when he was younger? I can't find any info on his earlier life. In a 1967 exhibition at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, Mr. Feigner faced Willie Mays, Roberto Clemente, Brooks Robinson, Willie McCovey, Maury Wills and Harmon Killebrew and struck out all six in succession.
    HW, my dad took me to see Eddie in the late 1950's, Niagara Falls. Many, many years later I saw him in Buffalo NY, with my son, Eddie was in his 60's and still a thrill to see. He did sign a program for my son.

    I find it hard to believe that there was never a tape or later a DVD showing this guys career. About 10 years ago I phoned one of his family members, asked if they had any family videos of Eddie, anything, any type video that might be available to the public. I was told something was in the works, I doubt it, 10 years later still nothing.

    A shame, what an act he was, not much to remember him by. There are a number of short videos on Youtube, I've looked them all over. Greatest act on a baseball diamond that I ever saw.
    Once asked why, with the way he pitches he even needs a four man team, his answer, we need a batter if we load the bases.

  5. #5
    One of the Youtube video's, funny story by Eddie.
    Pitching to a batter, with two outs and two strikes, one more strike or any kind of out, ball game over.

    Eddie said he heard on of the opposing players from the bench yell to the batter..."watch out, he throws the last pitch behind his back."
    So, Eddie made the behind the back motion but threw the ball in to his own glove. The ump was in on the act and called, "strike three, your out"..........game over.

    The batter was all over the ump, giving him a piece of his mind, yelling at the ump.
    Eddie's catcher was doubled over in laughter. He walked out to the mound and told Eddie, guess what the batter was complaining about.............he thought the pitch was high, true story.

  6. #6
    it was NOT from 60' 6" as I recall but from the shorter softball dimensions
    1. The more I learn, the more convinced I am that many players are over-rated due to inflated stats from offensive home parks (and eras)
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    The King and His Court were on ABC's Wide World of Sports from time to time.
    "He's tougher than a railroad sandwich."
    "You'se Got The Eye Of An Eagle."

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    Quote Originally Posted by 9RoyHobbsRF View Post
    it was NOT from 60' 6" as I recall but from the shorter softball dimensions
    That's what I figured. It was the same with Jennie Finch. I want to know which major league teams wanted to sign Feigner?
    Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

    http://sfgiants-forum.com/forum/index.php

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    This type of thing would not cut it in the major leagues. Feigner or Finch may be able to strike out guys, but once the pro hitters got used to the pitching style, they would be all over it.

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    My dad saw them in person in Illinois... probably in the 1950s. He said they were unbelievable.
    Your Second Base Coach
    That number "WAR" does NOT measure wins above replacement. I am not sure what it measures, but it sure isn't the value between a player and his back-up. The final number certainly does not measure what the name suggests.
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    Feighner was an orphan who had a troubled teenage life so maybe he didn't play baseball at all? After leaving the Marines, he met his real mother and she helped him get his start in fast pitch softball. One report gave his fastest speed as 112 MPH, but most sources list it at "only" 104 MPH. Imagine the arm strength it took to throw a football 85 yards or to throw a football behind your back 50 yards as Eddie did. His softball was said to curve 18 inches, and in the videos you can watch it hook away from right-handed batters. It also looked to me like his ball rose on some pitches.

    Is fast pitch softball more popular on the West Coast or in the military?

    I probably watched his games on Wide World of Sports four or five times while growing up. The story of his life would make a wonderful movie or made for TV special.
    "He's tougher than a railroad sandwich."
    "You'se Got The Eye Of An Eagle."

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    There was also a Queen and Her Court, think she was still active in the late '80s and I would guess she was about 40 then. Think I remember reading she struck out Bench and a few other ML players.

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Dude Paskert View Post
    There was also a Queen and Her Court, think she was still active in the late '80s and I would guess she was about 40 then. Think I remember reading she struck out Bench and a few other ML players.
    I would think the fact that the ball is not only being delivered overhand and also add to that from a raised mound in MLB, facing the underhand delivery could make contact more difficult. I think with a few more at bats, they would really drive some balls out, way out.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SHOELESSJOE3 View Post
    I would think the fact that the ball is not only being delivered overhand and also add to that from a raised mound in MLB, facing the underhand delivery could make contact more difficult. I think with a few more at bats, they would really drive some balls out, way out.
    I agree with you, it's just that an adjustment is needed to the radically different conditions. I mean, I have a lot of respect for Crystl Bustos, but I don't think she's better than ML hitters. One very odd thing to get used to is that a ball can truly be thrown up through the strike zone with the low release point and no mound...a rise ball in softball really can be a rising ball!

  15. #15
    I played a very WEE bit of fast pitch softball before entering the Army. A baseball team I played for contributed to a pick up squad of locals who had challenged a fast pitch softtball league team to a game. As I remember, I was a proud 1 for 4 in a losing effort in which "we" were shut out, something like 11-0.

    After service, just one year of ASA Fastpitch League play was more than enough for me. In a schedule of 18 or so games, I rode the bench and appeared in maybe 3 games, with one AB. I whiffed. End of ASA career. [The team did make it into the regional playoffs. We had one guy who blasted a dozen HRs in 18 games ... eye popping. No 'roids].

    We didn't have to face Feigner [thank goodness]. However, what we did face was plenty impressive all by itself. And yes, a RISE ball does just that ... better'n yeast.
    Last edited by leewileyfan; 08-19-2012 at 05:43 PM.

  16. #16
    Years ago in Buffalo and Rochester there were loads of fast pitch soft ball teams and games.
    Not anymore, replaced by entire leagues of slow pitch soft ball. I am sure most know the game, pitcher delivers ball in a high arc to at least add some difficulty for the batter to get a real good swing on the pitch.

    Played and watched many fast pitch games long ago. You get a good fast pitch softball pitcher it is very difficult to get a good swing on most pitches. I can understand why the interest in fast pitch soft ball has dropped.

  17. #17
    Bump.

    I never even knew this guy existed. Amazing!
    Red, it took me 16 years to get here. Play me, and you'll get the best I got.

  18. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by SHOELESSJOE3 View Post
    HW, my dad took me to see Eddie in the late 1950's, Niagara Falls. Many, many years later I saw him in Buffalo NY, with my son, Eddie was in his 60's and still a thrill to see. He did sign a program for my son.

    I find it hard to believe that there was never a tape or later a DVD showing this guys career. About 10 years ago I phoned one of his family members, asked if they had any family videos of Eddie, anything, any type video that might be available to the public. I was told something was in the works, I doubt it, 10 years later still nothing.

    A shame, what an act he was, not much to remember him by. There are a number of short videos on Youtube, I've looked them all over. Greatest act on a baseball diamond that I ever saw.
    Once asked why, with the way he pitches he even needs a four man team, his answer, we need a batter if we load the bases.
    Torrez, thoought I would just repost my earlier post.
    Saw him twice, 40 years apart, the guy was amazing.
    Still waiting, cvontscted the family year ago and they told me their may be a video in the future, been years, I doubt it.
    What a shame, no real video out there.

  19. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by SHOELESSJOE3 View Post
    What a shame, no real video out there.
    What a shame indeed! This guy makes you wanna say Walter who, Cy who, Satchel who, etc., etc.

    You were a lucky man to see him in person. I just discovered him as I've been researching the best players/pitchers who never played in the majors.
    Red, it took me 16 years to get here. Play me, and you'll get the best I got.

  20. #20
    Saw him for the last time in Buffalo NY, 1980.
    Went into the dugout after the game, talked for a while, he signed this book.
    He appeared in so many small towns also, any where there was adiaond..

    They were also so entertaining. On the small diamond you could hear them banter, shouting to each other, clever lines.

    Saw him on a small field in Jamestown NY, one of their on the field funny lines.
    One of his players........."Hey Eddie, the mayor of Jamestown is here and he brought two people with him".
    Eddie replies "Oh is that so, who did he bring with him'.
    Player replies, Well, his lovely wife is on the third base side and his lovely girl friend is on the first base side."
    Attached Images Attached Images

  21. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by SHOELESSJOE3 View Post
    Saw him for the last time in Buffalo NY, 1980.
    Went into the dugout after the game, talked for a while, he signed this book.
    He appeared in so many small towns also, any where there was adiaond..

    They were also so entertaining. On the small diamond you could hear them banter, shouting to each other, clever lines.

    Saw him on a small field in Jamestown NY, one of their on the field funny lines.
    One of his players........."Hey Eddie, the mayor of Jamestown is here and he brought two people with him".
    Eddie replies "Oh is that so, who did he bring with him'.
    Player replies, Well, his lovely wife is on the third base side and his lovely girl friend is on the first base side."
    I don't see the above book on Amazon but I do see From An Orphan To A King - Eddie Feigner. I'll be checking that out.
    Red, it took me 16 years to get here. Play me, and you'll get the best I got.

  22. #22
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    He supposedly had an offer from the Yankees. I saw him several times. It was okay the first time, but it got to be a bore in the 1980s when his agent would call me every year to try to schedule him. (How many times do you need to see the Harlem Globetrotters, for example.) It got so every year his agent claimed it would be the last chance to see him, but he'd call year after year. By then, he wasn't throwing as hard, and Craig Estrada, son of former big leaguer Chuck Estrada, would finish the game. I was told Estrada was being groomed to be the next king. Feigner was also an obnoxious jerk off the field.

  23. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by torez77 View Post
    I don't see the above book on Amazon but I do see From An Orphan To A King - Eddie Feigner. I'll be checking that out.

    I will take a look at that book. The book I displayed, think it was only sold at games.
    I saw him do it all, blindfolded, from second base, you had to see it.
    He answered the challenge in one game, played with only three players, no SS, pitched a no hitter.
    In one inning the King's team loaded the bases, no one to bat. Don't know how that was settled.


    From this book.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  24. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by Macker View Post
    He supposedly had an offer from the Yankees. I saw him several times. It was okay the first time, but it got to be a bore in the 1980s when his agent would call me every year to try to schedule him. (How many times do you need to see the Harlem Globetrotters, for example.) It got so every year his agent claimed it would be the last chance to see him, but he'd call year after year. By then, he wasn't throwing as hard, and Craig Estrada, son of former big leaguer Chuck Estrada, would finish the game. I was told Estrada was being groomed to be the next king. Feigner was also an obnoxious jerk off the field.
    Obnoxious, do we know that for a fact or is this one of those stories that got legs over the years.
    Sounds to me from your opening that you really didn't care much for him.
    I saw nothing boring about him.
    Don't compare him to the Globetrotter act, teams were out to beat him.
    So he wasn't throwing hard in the 1980's, come on, the guy was pitching in the 1950's.
    Why would you go to see him so many times if it was boring.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SHOELESSJOE3 View Post
    Obnoxious, do we know that for a fact or is this one of those stories that got legs over the years.
    I know from my own experience.

    Sounds to me from your opening that you really didn't care much for him.
    You're right. He also spoke to his manager/agent in a demeaning way in front of others. I used to wonder what the manager got paid to put up with Feigner.

    I saw nothing boring about him. Don't compare him to the Globetrotter act, teams were out to beat him.
    I saw a team out to beat him who trounced him (despite being limited to two bases -- didn't matter, because bombs over the fence were still homers.) Some of the game is a setup. His braggadocio routine got old after a few times. Great show the first time, but that's it.

    Why would you go to see him so many times if it was boring.
    I ran an organization that hosted him until we decided we didn't want him back. Also, after the game, he had an expectation to be treated at the local watering hole and suck up what little profits we made. Even when he was a has-been, he insisted on movie-star treatment. Muhammad Ali can get away with that, but not Feigner.

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