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Thread: Nine Tips For The College-Bound Ballplayer

  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by tradosaurus View Post
    Well there are other major differences but another one is a boy can earn money by going pro.
    You may want to read about pro Fastpitch. Keep up, trad. I know 3 girl pros.
    Last edited by songtitle; 12-22-2012 at 11:10 AM.
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  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by songtitle View Post
    You may want to read about pro Fastpitch.
    Hasn't that league folded a number of times? IMO, the highest level in softball is the National Team, now that softball is gone from the Olympics.

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by pstein View Post
    Hasn't that league folded a number of times? IMO, the highest level in softball is the National Team, now that softball is gone from the Olympics.
    My daughter played against the Chicago Bandits last year. Had a good game. Go look at their roster. Some really good softball players on that team:

    http://www.chicagobandits.com/team/roster/
    Granny said Sonny stick to your guns if you believe in something no matter what. Because it's better to be hated for who you are than to be loved for who you're not.

  4. #44
    My two cents:

    1. Read the NCAA Student Guide – and register if you have any hopes of D1 or D3 ball, as it’s not just necessary for getting scholarship money. The registration also determines if you have any amateurism issues.
    2. Take the SAT or ACT no later than the fall of your Junior Year – agreed that this is too late. Spring of Junior year is the latest, particularly if you’re aiming for D3 schools or those with tough academic qualifications. As to the “weighted/unweighted” debate, it’s sort of a matter of semantics, as you’ll need a good unweighted GPA plus a reasonable number of AP or IB (International Baccalaureate) courses that top academic schools demand and that affect the weighting. Also, you’ll want to have at least a couple of those AP classes in the junior year, so you have the scores available by summer. (And, sorry, Jake, while schools are troubled by the SAT and ACT, there's no realistic chance that a sizable number will abandon use of them any time soon.
    4. Visit sites such as hsbaseballweb.org and College Confidential's Athletics Forum to gain information. For those looking D3, http://www.d3baseball.com is a also good resource, as is RecruitingRealities.com
    6. Videotape yourself and edit the tape to submit to college coaches. Agreed - no music. Oh, and put it on YouTube with a ‘private’ URL address that only coaches you contact with it can see; coaches don’t want to have to dig through piles of DVD’s to find yours when they’re trying to decide about your kid – it’s easier to just grab your kid’s email and click on the YouTube link in it. I disagree that highlights are always unhelpful, as it depends on what position you play and what your skills are. If you’re a power pitcher or power hitter, a couple of 92 MPH heaters in the pen or a few 400-foot shots in BP may be enough, alongside some reasonable game stats. And, certainly, middle infielders will want to show they can make all the plays. But, for others, highlights showing that your game skills can exceed raw tools may be the best way to present what you can contribute. Also, a 40-second testimonial from a respected coach or scout about the kid placed at the end may help. Usually, a 2 – 3 minute video well-edited is long enough, and begin with a video’d greeting/introduction from the kid to personalize him. It’s best to send the email with the YouTube link a week or two in advance of a showcase that you know the coach or his assistant will be attending, so they link the kid up with an opportunity to view him. Also, there’s nothing wrong with sending a follow-up email with a link to an additional highlight every month or so after the coach has seen you, both to remind the coach of your interest and highlight your skills – I took video of one of my son’s teammates hitting and running out a triple in late summer ball after showcases, and his Dad (via the kid’s email, of course) immediately shopped it around to the coaches the kid had talked to to remind them of his power and speed.

    Other tips:

    Rule #1: focus on schools you’d be happy attending even if the baseball thing doesn’t work out, as sometimes it doesn't, whether out of injury or the kid's realization that the time required isn't worth it.

    Why isn’t there more about attending showcases? That’s going to be a big factor in almost every decision unless your kid is a superstar or is willing for academic or financial reasons to play below the level he might otherwise be recruited for. (And there’s nothing wrong with ‘playing down’; if your kid isn’t going to the pros, why push for a non-scholarship walk-on [where he probably won’t play much] at a D1 school, where his academic interests in fact are best served at a top academic D3 school where he’ll play and won’t have to practice 5 hours a day?)

    On-campus visits should include a visit to see the coach, if possible. If nothing else, offering to see him reminds him that you cared enough to make a visit and shows that you’re really interested in the school. Just make sure the kid realizes that he's there to sell himself - look the coach in the eye and talk about how much he'd love to play at the school.

    Cannonball’s advice has some great additional clues – get HS and summer coaches involved and have them send out feelers, have the kid initiate contacts, and don’t put too many eggs in one basket. Often, a coach who may sound very positive will have a better player he’s reaching for and your kid may get aced out if that kid accepts.
    In this vein, TonyK’s excellent advice includes the gem about knowing the team’s roster. – particularly you’ll find that teams will send out a press release in May or June of your kid’s Junior year about their incoming recruiting class. These are the kids who will be sophs when your kid comes in and will be directly competing against him for at least three years; their specialties will impact your kid’s attractiveness to a coach and playing time more than those of kids who will be seniors or juniors when your kid starts out.

  5. #45
    Quote Originally Posted by Ursa Major View Post
    My two cents:


    In this vein, TonyK’s excellent advice includes the gem about knowing the team’s roster. – particularly you’ll find that teams will send out a press release in May or June of your kid’s Junior year about their incoming recruiting class. These are the kids who will be sophs when your kid comes in and will be directly competing against him for at least three years; their specialties will impact your kid’s attractiveness to a coach and playing time more than those of kids who will be seniors or juniors when your kid starts out.
    I wouldn't over think the roster aspect too much. The reality is that there is always be competition everywhere and there is a very good chance that a prospective player will not be playing their high school position. So along these lines, a player should promote-and be able to back up-that they are a ss-cfielder, a 3b-2b-lf type, a c-ib-3b'dh, etc. It's common that players play a different position in college or that a guy that plays a certain position in college one year plays a different position the next. In other words, if you can hit they'll get you in the lineup.

  6. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by omg View Post
    I wouldn't over think the roster aspect too much. The reality is that there is always be competition everywhere and there is a very good chance that a prospective player will not be playing their high school position. So along these lines, a player should promote-and be able to back up-that they are a ss-cfielder, a 3b-2b-lf type, a c-ib-3b'dh, etc. It's common that players play a different position in college or that a guy that plays a certain position in college one year plays a different position the next. In other words, if you can hit they'll get you in the lineup.
    I agree with OMG on this one. I was recruited as a middle infielder. When I got there for my freshman year, there were a handful of guys all better than me. They moved me to the outfield and I was able to play pretty early on. My added advice on this would be to sharpen up the skills at another position. For guys who are the fleetest of foot, I highly recommend speed/agility training throughout HS.
    "Smith corks it into right, down the line. It may go...........Go crazy folks! Go crazy! Jack Buck

  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by omg View Post
    I wouldn't over think the roster aspect too much. The reality is that there is always be competition everywhere and there is a very good chance that a prospective player will not be playing their high school position. So along these lines, a player should promote-and be able to back up-that they are a ss-cfielder, a 3b-2b-lf type, a c-ib-3b'dh, etc. It's common that players play a different position in college or that a guy that plays a certain position in college one year plays a different position the next. In other words, if you can hit they'll get you in the lineup.
    In college at the D1 and D2 level outside of pitchers, catchers and players who can drive the ball a mile, almost every player is a former high school shortstop or center fielder. They were the best, most versatile athletes from their high school conference. But you do want to make sure the roster isn't loaded with freshman and soph starters. But there's a fifty percent chance at the D1 level the recruit is going to transfer to play someplace else after not winning a position. If you can hit and don't have a position there's DH, first and left. These are positions schools don't recruit. If a first baseman is recruited it's because he's a 6'4" masher.

    My son was an all-conference shortstop, then center fielder in high school. This spring will be his red shirt freshman year (he had an injury). He was told this spring he'll get playing time at 2b, 3b, rf and lf. He played all those positions except left on his travel and showcase teams. When kids get to college ball, unless they're arrogant studs they just want to get on the field anywhere. My son said it's humbling to be on the field with so many good players rather than being the best. He used to work his tail off to be the best. Now he works it off to get on the field.
    Last edited by tg643; 12-24-2012 at 07:45 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JRH11 View Post
    I agree with OMG on this one. I was recruited as a middle infielder. When I got there for my freshman year, there were a handful of guys all better than me. They moved me to the outfield and I was able to play pretty early on. My added advice on this would be to sharpen up the skills at another position. For guys who are the fleetest of foot, I highly recommend speed/agility training throughout HS.
    If as kid wants to draw attention at a showcase run a sixty under 6.8. They absolutely fall in love with the 6.5 and 6.6 guys. But they figure anything under 6.8 can be worked down to 6.6 or better. My son ran a 6.75. From physical and speed training at the college he's down to 6.6. I do remind him he can't steal first.

  9. #49
    Quote Originally Posted by tg643 View Post
    If as kid wants to draw attention at a showcase run a sixty under 6.8. They absolutely fall in love with the 6.5 and 6.6 guys. But they figure anything under 6.8 can be worked down to 6.6 or better. My son ran a 6.75. From physical and speed training at the college he's down to 6.6. I do remind him he can't steal first.


    Which brings up a good point. In my experience, it's still important to be good. It's still important to have eye-hand coordination. It's still important to have balance. It's still important to put your nose in front of a ground ball or your head and shoulders in harm's way of a breaking pitch. It's still important to be a student of the game and a fanatical practicer. It's still important to have quick hands and be able to handle good pitching.

    Like you said, can't steal first base. I understand what you are saying about the fast 60 times and I have heard this about college ball as well. But I don't believe it, don't believe there are a boat load of 6.6 guys in high college ball that are the main players. I've seen plenty-plenty- of 6.6 guys who just couldn't play a lick. Can't stay in the lineup because they are boneheads, chokers, or can't hit. College coaches are about winning. Period. From what I see in the college game the players are in there because they are good-fast is much further down the line.

  10. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by omg View Post
    [/B]

    Which brings up a good point. In my experience, it's still important to be good. It's still important to have eye-hand coordination. It's still important to have balance. It's still important to put your nose in front of a ground ball or your head and shoulders in harm's way of a breaking pitch. It's still important to be a student of the game and a fanatical practicer. It's still important to have quick hands and be able to handle good pitching.

    Like you said, can't steal first base. I understand what you are saying about the fast 60 times and I have heard this about college ball as well. But I don't believe it, don't believe there are a boat load of 6.6 guys in high college ball that are the main players. I've seen plenty-plenty- of 6.6 guys who just couldn't play a lick. Can't stay in the lineup because they are boneheads, chokers, or can't hit. College coaches are about winning. Period. From what I see in the college game the players are in there because they are good-fast is much further down the line.
    omg,

    TG is right. What happens is that college coaches try to recruit guys that give have good physical gifts because if they don't work out later, no one will blame the coach. If you recruit a 6'4" kid who runs like a deer (6.6 60) and has a cannon of an arm, but ends up not being able to hit, well, few will blame the coach for recruiting a specimen like that. Conversely, if you sign a 7.3 second 5'9" kid who in the end can't hit either, well, automatically folks will point to the kids physical tools as why they didn't make it.

    I know as a fact that some D1 schools won't recruit an OF unless they run a 6.8 or better. Middle infielders can be 7.2 or 7.3, corner guys and catchers even worse, but 60 times absolutely are taken into account in the recruiting process, even if your comments are in fact true that many fast guys can't hit. It's just part of the recruiting game.

  11. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by JJA View Post
    omg,

    TG is right. What happens is that college coaches try to recruit guys that give have good physical gifts because if they don't work out later, no one will blame the coach. If you recruit a 6'4" kid who runs like a deer (6.6 60) and has a cannon of an arm, but ends up not being able to hit, well, few will blame the coach for recruiting a specimen like that. Conversely, if you sign a 7.3 second 5'9" kid who in the end can't hit either, well, automatically folks will point to the kids physical tools as why they didn't make it.

    I know as a fact that some D1 schools won't recruit an OF unless they run a 6.8 or better. Middle infielders can be 7.2 or 7.3, corner guys and catchers even worse, but 60 times absolutely are taken into account in the recruiting process, even if your comments are in fact true that many fast guys can't hit. It's just part of the recruiting game.
    When my son did showcases I would see a lot of coaches writing down his number after he ran the sixty. After two major injuries he had to walk on as an almost guaranteed walk on. His hitting coach and a pro scout contacted the college coach to tell him he was physical rehabbed and ready to go. In the walk on tryout as soon as he ran the sixty and threw a couple of BBs from right to third he was told to come back the next day for the scrimmage in the top prospects camp. He went 2-3 with the out being the hardest hit ball. One of the hits was a grounder in the shortstop hole he beat by two steps.

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    Quote Originally Posted by omg View Post
    [/B]

    Which brings up a good point. In my experience, it's still important to be good. It's still important to have eye-hand coordination. It's still important to have balance. It's still important to put your nose in front of a ground ball or your head and shoulders in harm's way of a breaking pitch. It's still important to be a student of the game and a fanatical practicer. It's still important to have quick hands and be able to handle good pitching.

    Like you said, can't steal first base. I understand what you are saying about the fast 60 times and I have heard this about college ball as well. But I don't believe it, don't believe there are a boat load of 6.6 guys in high college ball that are the main players. I've seen plenty-plenty- of 6.6 guys who just couldn't play a lick. Can't stay in the lineup because they are boneheads, chokers, or can't hit. College coaches are about winning. Period. From what I see in the college game the players are in there because they are good-fast is much further down the line.
    Most of the center and right fielders in major conference D1 run 6.6' or better. Many of the left fielders do unless they are mashers. The ball is hit so hard at that level the ball can get up the gaps quickly. You should see the scouts drool at the high school kids who run a 6.4 or 6.5 at showcases. The Rays talked Carl Crawford out of playing football at Nebraska after he ran a 6.4.

  13. #53
    TG and JJA,

    I hear what you are saying but I still think you are overstating this. Yes, a guy who runs a 6.6 will have an excellent chance to make it as a walk on. They pick guys as walk ons who have promise. Just like with the pros, some will pan out but no real loss if they don't. What you all are saying might be true with some elite schools but by and large if you can play, really play then you are still the one who will be the college starter, the college producer. Skills are still important. Evaluation is still difficult. Looking good in your uniform and running a 6.6 will get you the looks but you still need that eye-hand. You still have to put the bat on the ball, the ball still needs to jump off the bat, and, oh, yeh, gotta be able to hit the breaking stuff. In college, you still need to be pretty good, pretty quick or you will get cut.

    There aren't that many 6.6 guys around anyways, not who can play. If they could, they'd be in the pros. Now you can say this guy got drafted or that guy got drafted but, really, getting drafted doesn't mean you'll be a good college player. Far from it. I've seen a boatload of high draft picks either get cut in college or have miserable careers.

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    Quote Originally Posted by omg View Post
    TG and JJA,

    I hear what you are saying but I still think you are overstating this. Yes, a guy who runs a 6.6 will have an excellent chance to make it as a walk on. They pick guys as walk ons who have promise. Just like with the pros, some will pan out but no real loss if they don't. What you all are saying might be true with some elite schools but by and large if you can play, really play then you are still the one who will be the college starter, the college producer. Skills are still important. Evaluation is still difficult. Looking good in your uniform and running a 6.6 will get you the looks but you still need that eye-hand. You still have to put the bat on the ball, the ball still needs to jump off the bat, and, oh, yeh, gotta be able to hit the breaking stuff. In college, you still need to be pretty good, pretty quick or you will get cut.

    There aren't that many 6.6 guys around anyways, not who can play. If they could, they'd be in the pros. Now you can say this guy got drafted or that guy got drafted but, really, getting drafted doesn't mean you'll be a good college player. Far from it. I've seen a boatload of high draft picks either get cut in college or have miserable careers.
    My son wasn't a typical walk on. He was being recruited by the program before he suffered a torn MCL and PCL followed by a shoulder separation to his throwing arm requiring surgery. Before his injures he was rated a top ten outfield prospect in our metro area. He was runner up conference player of the year junior year of high school. He was a three time all-conference player. He was on the top showcase team.

    He was going to delay entering college for a semester to showcase in the fall. He played the spring high school season three weeks after tossing away his sling. By August his hitting instructor told him he was ready. As a backup he had applied in been accepted to several colleges interested before his injuries. A pro scout contacted the coaches on his behalf where he had been accepted looking for a roster spot. When he ran his sixty and threw it was verification he was healthy, not that he was a track star who might hit.

    We're going to have to disagree on the 6.6 college players. Outfields at the major conference level are full of them. It doesn't mean they will be drafted or play MLB ball. What you will see is a 6.6 or better college player get the benefit of the doubt and get drafted in the late rounds. Given 94% of MLBers come from the first 20 rounds of the draft it's a good risk to draft athletes late. It's mostly a nothing to lose proposition for the MLB franchise. They also draft big arms that haven't delivered in college after the 20th round.

    The reason I reminded my son he can't steal first is so he doesn't lose sight the most important thing is still hitting the ball. Also, in the back of my mind I question his bat speed for major conference competition. But it's a college he would have attended even if he wasn't an athlete. If baseball doesn't work out he's not transferring. This past summer he succeeded in a summer league that was mostly mid major players with some major conference and stud D2 and D3 players. It was the best placement his coach could get given he was a red shirt last year.

  15. #55
    Quote Originally Posted by omg View Post
    [/B]

    Which brings up a good point. In my experience, it's still important to be good. It's still important to have eye-hand coordination. It's still important to have balance. It's still important to put your nose in front of a ground ball or your head and shoulders in harm's way of a breaking pitch. It's still important to be a student of the game and a fanatical practicer. It's still important to have quick hands and be able to handle good pitching.

    Like you said, can't steal first base. I understand what you are saying about the fast 60 times and I have heard this about college ball as well. But I don't believe it, don't believe there are a boat load of 6.6 guys in high college ball that are the main players. I've seen plenty-plenty- of 6.6 guys who just couldn't play a lick. Can't stay in the lineup because they are boneheads, chokers, or can't hit. College coaches are about winning. Period. From what I see in the college game the players are in there because they are good-fast is much further down the line.
    I actually agree with both of you.

    there is an arguement for both. first of all Baseball is still a game of skill and you can either hit or not. there have been tons of super athletic Kids drafted to the MLB who later proved to not be able to hit anything. and on the other hand there are slow and unathletic guys who just can hit and are in the HOF now. the book moneyball (yeah I know...) pointed out that teaching toolsy players at adult Age to Play usually don't work (a free swinger almost never becomes Patient and most wild 99 mph relievers stay wild for the rest of their career-although there are a few notable exeptions.

    Baseball wisdom is that you cannot teach Tools but you can teach skills which is only partially true since Motor learning as well as other Habits are best done at early age. I have seen an interview with a figure Skating Coach who was asked about a talented skater (like 17yo or so) had some technical flaws if he could correct him and he said "Forget about it if he hasn't learned that by age 13 he is never going to learn it". so there are serious limits to the tool based (arm, power, speed) recruiting approach.

    but on the other hand we have the problem that HS (and even college) stats are hardly comparable because the Levels of Play are so diverse. so instead of having nothing objective the recruiters might use the only objective data they have- if anything just to protect their Job as JJA said because if they recruit a slow kid just because he hit .500 in HS they will receive a lot of flag.

    on the other hand nobody is going to criticize a Scout who signs a 99 mph thrower or 6.5 runner who doesn't make it because he is mentally weak.
    I now have my own non commercial blog about training for batspeed and power using my training experience in baseball and track and field.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dominik View Post

    Baseball wisdom is that you cannot teach Tools but you can teach skills which is only partially true since Motor learning as well as other Habits are best done at early age. I have seen an interview with a figure Skating Coach who was asked about a talented skater (like 17yo or so) had some technical flaws if he could correct him and he said "Forget about it if he hasn't learned that by age 13 he is never going to learn it". so there are serious limits to the tool based (arm, power, speed) recruiting approach.
    That's not totally true. While it becomes progressively tougher to change the swing pattern after 13 or 14, it can be done. It requires many repetitions and quite a bit of time.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dominik View Post
    I actually agree with both of you.

    there is an arguement for both. first of all Baseball is still a game of skill and you can either hit or not. there have been tons of super athletic Kids drafted to the MLB who later proved to not be able to hit anything. and on the other hand there are slow and unathletic guys who just can hit and are in the HOF now. the book moneyball (yeah I know...) pointed out that teaching toolsy players at adult Age to Play usually don't work (a free swinger almost never becomes Patient and most wild 99 mph relievers stay wild for the rest of their career-although there are a few notable exeptions.

    Baseball wisdom is that you cannot teach Tools but you can teach skills which is only partially true since Motor learning as well as other Habits are best done at early age. I have seen an interview with a figure Skating Coach who was asked about a talented skater (like 17yo or so) had some technical flaws if he could correct him and he said "Forget about it if he hasn't learned that by age 13 he is never going to learn it". so there are serious limits to the tool based (arm, power, speed) recruiting approach.

    but on the other hand we have the problem that HS (and even college) stats are hardly comparable because the Levels of Play are so diverse. so instead of having nothing objective the recruiters might use the only objective data they have- if anything just to protect their Job as JJA said because if they recruit a slow kid just because he hit .500 in HS they will receive a lot of flag.

    on the other hand nobody is going to criticize a Scout who signs a 99 mph thrower or 6.5 runner who doesn't make it because he is mentally weak.
    Since 50% of D1 players transfer looking for a place to play it means there's a 50% failure rate in recruiting. There's three reasons for it ...

    1) Coaching staff overesatimated the potential of the prospect when he saw him play (they have limited exposure)
    2) While the school was interested the player overestimated his ability to compete for a position
    3) Player had the ability but is the odd man out in the numbers game

    Of the sixteen players from my son's travel class seven transferred after the first year. It was because they failed, they were the odd man out or didn't like the culture of the region since they went far from home. Unless a player can see a future on the field with his team at the end of freshman year it's get out of town time. There's going to be another ten recruits coming in behind him next year. Waiting until after soph season means sitting out the first draft year due to NCAA transfer rules or playing down to D2. Waiting until after soph year removes the playing at a D1 JuCo option. Also, the coach may approach the player and tell him he's not in next years plans and won't have a scholarship. This player has to sit out a year due to transfer rules, play JuCo or move down to D2 which is a screwing by the NCAA.

    I know two kids who were recruited by a ranked program after being Gatorage Player of the Year in their respective states. It was also a school anyone would want their kid at academically. They both washed out of the baseball program freshman year. They transferred and are still considered pro prospects. One transferred to a D1/ ACC school and sat out soph year. The other went JuCo and is now playing in the Sun Belt Conference.

    Here's an ugly recruiting story. One of my son's travel teammates was being recruited by the head coach at college A. The head coach leaves to become an assistant at college B, a more prestigious baseball program. Rumor is he will take over the head job in two or three years. The coach recruits the player to college B. The player gets there and the head coach doesn't like his game. He tries to change everything. The kid fails. The head coach stops talking to him. He never travels (only 25 of 35 travel). Finally after two twenty run blowouts where the kid didn't get in the game he approaches the head coach. The head coach tells him he's not in his plans and to transfer. The head coach was going to wait until after the season to tell the kid while he was busting his chops trying to please him. So you want to play major college baseball?

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    Quote Originally Posted by pstein View Post
    That's not totally true. While it becomes progressively tougher to change the swing pattern after 13 or 14, it can be done. It requires many repetitions and quite a bit of time.
    A hitting coach worked with my son over the winter between soph and junior seasons. The guy is a pro scout who said my son could play major college ball with a better swing. He changed everything. Aside from the one lesson per week my son hit off the tee the other six days. He went from a dead pull hitter who hit .340 (due to bunting for hits) to hitting .524 with power because he was now swinging through the ball and hitting gap to gap rather than trying to jerk and pull everything. His swing got real smooth. He probably would have had some power anyway junior year. He added 25 pounds over the winter. But he wouldn't have had the big year he experienced. He wouldn't be at the level he's at without the reconstruction of his swing.

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    if they recruit a slow kid just because he hit .500 in HS they will receive a lot of flag.

    Kids don't get recruited on high school stats. The stats are only a resume bullet that may warrant a look. The difference between D1 recruiting for college and MLB drafting is the college coach has a two year window of expectations. The college coach is looking at tools that are mostly ready to go. He expects the player to have impact by soph season. He can take a chance on a longshot because he has a 35 man roster where only 20-22 get any playing time. But each year the coach has to make room for 10 more prospects even if it means taking away the roster spot of a current player. Players 28-35 don't get athletic scholarship money. These are usually the projects. If they aren't productive they didn't harm the team over the season. But next year they may be taking up valuable roster space. A player drafted by an MLB franchise has 4-7 years to develop and make it depending on if he signed out of high school or college. The rule of thumb is if you're in AA ball during spring training when you're 26 expect to hear "coach wants to talk to you in his office."

  20. #60
    Quote Originally Posted by tg643 View Post
    Of the sixteen players from my son's travel class seven transferred after the first year. It was because they failed.....
    Amazing that HALF from "top level showcase team" ended up transferring because they failed.How do you explain that, how do the travel coaches explain that? I agree that college ball is a tough business and very competitive but the number seems high for an elite travel team.

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