View Poll Results: Should Butch Wynegar be in the Hall of Fame?

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  • Yes

    0 0%
  • No

    23 100.00%
  • Maybe

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  • Not a Hall of Famer, but he had Hall of Fame potential

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Thread: Butch Wynegar

  1. #1

    Butch Wynegar

    I'm not certain, but I think Butch Wynegar might be a case of "Hall of Fame potential."

    The former catcher played in the big leagues from 1976 to 1988, hitting .255 with 1,102 hits and a 1.5:1 BB/K ratio. He was an All-Star twice (in his first two years) and finished second in Rookie of the Year voting in 1976. He also received MVP votes that year.

    His comparisons list from Baseball Reference isn't too impressive--it contains Mike Scioscia, Rick Cerone, Alan Ashby, Johnny Edwards, Gus Mancuso, Joe Girardi, Dan Wilson, Jerry Grote, Frank Snyder and Mike Matheny--but he is also listed as being most similar to Ivan Rodriguez through age 21, Hall of Famer Ray Schalk through age 29 and Hall of Famer Al Lopez through age 30.

    He led the league in number of runners caught stealing twice and caught stealing percentage once. His defensive WAR is 13.7, which coincidentally ties Ray Schalk.

    What do you think about Butch Wynegar? Should he be in the Hall of Fame? Did he have Hall of Fame potential?

  2. #2
    He started off good. Fine defensive player. On most teams, he would have been be a good starter. Although he did seem to struggle in the 2nd half of the season, historically. Wynegar just could not transition into his 30s well at all.

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    I would say a big no on this one. I wouldn't even think he had potential.
    "(Shoeless Joe Jackson's fall from grace is one of the real tragedies of baseball. I always thought he was more sinned against than sinning." -- Connie Mack

    "I have the ultimate respect for Whitesox fans. They were as miserable as the Cubs and Redsox fans ever were but always had the good decency to keep it to themselves. And when they finally won the World Series, they celebrated without annoying every other fan in the country."--Jim Caple, ESPN (Jan. 12, 2011)

  4. #4
    Can I get a hell no category on this one?

  5. #5
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    He reminded me of Matt Nokes.
    Lou Gehrig is the Truest Yankee of them all!

  6. #6
    The thing that struck me as fairly impressive was his relatively high WAR for a relatively short career (23.9 WAR; 13 years, 1301 games) and the number of Hall of Famers and future Hall of Famers on his comps list.

    Here's a list of the retired catchers with >= 23.9 WAR and <= 1,301 games played (similar catchers better than Wynegar):

    Charlie Bennett...37.2 WAR
    Roy Campanella...31.6 WAR
    Jack Clements...30.0 WAR
    Tom Haller...27.5 WAR
    Ed Bailey...25.1 WAR

    So I guess to be a Hall of Fame worthy catcher with that few games played, at least 30 WAR is requisite.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Cowtipper View Post
    I'm not certain, but I think Butch Wynegar might be a case of "Hall of Fame potential."

    The former catcher played in the big leagues from 1976 to 1988, hitting .255 with 1,102 hits and a 1.5:1 BB/K ratio. He was an All-Star twice (in his first two years) and finished second in Rookie of the Year voting in 1976. He also received MVP votes that year.

    His comparisons list from Baseball Reference isn't too impressive--it contains Mike Scioscia, Rick Cerone, Alan Ashby, Johnny Edwards, Gus Mancuso, Joe Girardi, Dan Wilson, Jerry Grote, Frank Snyder and Mike Matheny--but he is also listed as being most similar to Ivan Rodriguez through age 21, Hall of Famer Ray Schalk through age 29 and Hall of Famer Al Lopez through age 30.

    He led the league in number of runners caught stealing twice and caught stealing percentage once. His defensive WAR is 13.7, which coincidentally ties Ray Schalk.

    What do you think about Butch Wynegar? Should he be in the Hall of Fame? Did he have Hall of Fame potential?
    One of my favorites as a kid but not remotely close.

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  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Cowtipper View Post
    ... he is also listed as being most similar to Ivan Rodriguez through age 21, Hall of Famer Ray Schalk through age 29 and Hall of Famer Al Lopez through age 30.
    Yeah, that's one reason why I don't put too much stock in similarity scores. Comparing anyone through age 21 really doesn't mean much. Steve Kemp is most similar to Dave Winfield through age 23, but I don't think he's going to be joining him in Cooperstown anytime soon.

  9. #9
    I've got his Hall Rating at 51, meaning he was half-way to a Hall of Fame career. http://www.hallofstats.com/player/wynegbu01

    I also have his #1 comp as Mike Scioscia. So, that means it was a nice career. But it would take an incredibly lucky managerial career to make him a Hall of Famer.
    The Hall of Stats: An alternate Hall of Fame populated by a mathematical formula.

  10. #10
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    Heavens no.
    People ask me what I do in winter when there's no baseball. I'll tell you what I do. I stare out the window and wait for spring. -Rogers Hornsby

  11. #11
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    The only thing that would cause a person to think Wynegar had HOF potential was that he played in the big leagues at age 20. He never grew past that. Darrell Porter has a FAR better case.
    "I do not care if half the league strikes. Those who do it will encounter quick retribution. All will be suspended and I don't care if it wrecks the National League for five years. This is the United States of America and one citizen has as much right to play as another. The National League will go down the line with Robinson whatever the consequences. You will find if you go through with your intention that you have been guilty of complete madness."

    NL President Ford Frick, 1947

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