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Thread: Cardinal History

  1. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Herr28 View Post
    Does the book spend a lot of time on the great 1880s American Association Browns? I don't want to waste a lot of time reading about the horrible Browns teams of the early National League, that is a bit depressing. There was the season or two that the Robeson's added their best Spiders to our team when they bought it and changed the name to the Perfectos. The next year we became the Cardinals, based off the colors not the bird, but when the AL formed many of those great players went to other teams and we sucked again for a couple decades. I don't waste a lot of time reading about those depressing years either.

    St. Louis never really had much money to be able to compete with the Cubs and Giants in buying up the best players, and that is what led Branch Rickey to convince new owner (at that time in the 1920s) Sam Breadon that they should invest their money by buying up a minor league system of their own - to avoid having to bid against the deep pockets of New York and Chicago. From that period on, the Cardinals have had a competitive team with the big boys, and that is where I spend my time reading and studying our history. I do like to read up on the raucous bunch back in the 1880s AA, too. We had some excellent stars back then: Silver King, Tip O'Neill, Bob Caruthers, Arlie Latham, Curt Welch, Charlie Comiskey, Tony Mullane, Jumbo McGinnis, Fred Lewis and Dave Foutz among them. However, I don't like to spend a lot of time dwelling on those dark and lean years during the 1890s, and from 1901 through to the early 1920s.

    I guess that is what it feels like to be a Cubs fan! No hope, one miserable summer after another. That is terrible, I shouldn't have said that. But, my Cubs-fan cousin did like to ride me about that 17-run Cubbie win over the Birds the other day, so. . .
    The book focuses on the 1883 American Association season. St. Louis finished second that year.
    Rockies fan living in Texas

  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Danielh41 View Post
    The book focuses on the 1883 American Association season. St. Louis finished second that year.
    That fits in with the years I can stomach reading about. They had some fine players back then. I saw the book at a bookstore in town here a few months back, but I didn't check it out. I know some guys here had been talking about it, but I didn't follow much of that thread either. Now that I have the summer free, I might find time to give it a look, but I am backed up with 4 Dizzy Dean bios I picked up during the last semester, and the summer is my time for long motorcycle tours up north. The Dean books may be the only ones I can fit in the saddlebags, but I will certainly put this book on my read list for late summer/next winter.

    I appreciate the info, please share any fun moments that you enjoyed from the book if you have time! I don't worry about spoilers, I always enjoy a good baseball story!
    "It ain't braggin' if you can do it!" Dizzy Dean

    "There's no question in my mind that the best club I ever played with was the happily efficient Cardinal team of 1931." Frankie Frisch

    "I've seen a lot of great ballclubs in my day, but for pitching, hitting, spirit, and all-around balance, I would back my 1931 Cardinal team against any of them." Gabby Street

  3. #53
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    Here is Game 6 of the 1982 World Series, from youtube channel ClassicMLB11. The Cardinals even the Series at 3 apiece, back at home in Busch Stadium (despite the use of the DH, Dane Iorg in this game) with a 13-1 thrashing of the watered down Wallbangers! Young John Stuper (first rookie to start 2 World Series games since Dick Hughes in 1967) handcuffs the powerhouse Milwaukee lineup, and the Redbirds pound veteran Don Sutton and reliever Doc Medich to please the hometown crowd in the old coliseum under the Arch!



    Nice Atari ad after Stuper retires the top of the first!
    "It ain't braggin' if you can do it!" Dizzy Dean

    "There's no question in my mind that the best club I ever played with was the happily efficient Cardinal team of 1931." Frankie Frisch

    "I've seen a lot of great ballclubs in my day, but for pitching, hitting, spirit, and all-around balance, I would back my 1931 Cardinal team against any of them." Gabby Street

  4. #54
    Pacman
    I think walks are overrated unless you can run. If you get a walk and put the pitcher in a stretch, that helps, but the guy who walks and cant run, most of the time hes clogging up the bases for somebody who can run. Dusty Baker.

  5. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by dominik View Post
    Pacman
    Aw, c'mon. I hated those old joysticks and red button set ups. My cousin had a ton of Atari games, and I never got used to that damn joystick.
    "It ain't braggin' if you can do it!" Dizzy Dean

    "There's no question in my mind that the best club I ever played with was the happily efficient Cardinal team of 1931." Frankie Frisch

    "I've seen a lot of great ballclubs in my day, but for pitching, hitting, spirit, and all-around balance, I would back my 1931 Cardinal team against any of them." Gabby Street

  6. #56
    Quote Originally Posted by Herr28 View Post
    Aw, c'mon. I hated those old joysticks and red button set ups. My cousin had a ton of Atari games, and I never got used to that damn joystick.
    I would probably hate it now too but then I loved it. my dad got an atari very early and pacman was one of the games I remember.
    I think walks are overrated unless you can run. If you get a walk and put the pitcher in a stretch, that helps, but the guy who walks and cant run, most of the time hes clogging up the bases for somebody who can run. Dusty Baker.

  7. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by dominik View Post
    I would probably hate it now too but then I loved it. my dad got an atari very early and pacman was one of the games I remember.
    I haven't played on an Atari system in about 30 years, but we did get a couple discs of various Atari games for the X-Box a decade ago. My wife loved Dig Dug, and there was some game I played, Space Invaders or something like that - nope it was Galaga, or however it is spelled. The only problem (now that the joystick issue had been eliminated) is that I like a game with a goal, and end point. Many of those games where just endless, and the goal was to attain the high score at the arcade or pizza joint (where I first played Pac-Man in the very early 1980s). I don't care for that, I want to sit back and feel like I reached the satisfaction of "mission accomplished." I don't care to waste time wracking up point totals.

    I'll take a game with a storyline and an attainable victory, like Super Mario Brothers (III preferably) any day over a game where you just compile points, like Tetris. However, I can't remember the last time I played a video game. I still have that original X-Box sitting in the living room, we use it as a DVD player. My wife has a Wii, and we have a Gamecube so I could play the Super Mario Brothers games (I-III). They are all collecting dust.

    I was a fool in 2002 when moving from one apartment to another in Minneapolis, and I set my original Nintendo NES (with the game Contra, my favorite on that system) in front of our dumpster in the alley for anyone to take. What a moron. My favorite game to play back then was a baseball game on the Sega system, it was from 1991 or 1992. You could play any of those "current" teams, or any division champ from 1984 to date. I was always using the 1984 Padres, 1986 Red Sox, or 1986 Angels. The 1985 and 1987 Cardinals were still too painful for me to use at that time, oh it hurts to even think about it!

    While stationed in Illesheim, Bayern, with 6-6 Cav (Storck Barracks), I bought a Play Station and my buddy gave me a baseball game with 1998 stats and teams. I could create players with their own skill sets, so I made players for all my friends and family I played with while growing up, put us all on the Cardinals, and played a ton of seasons to collect the stats! That was my favorite game of all time. I tried a baseball game for the X-Box, but it sucked. I never got used to all the crap I had to do while pitching or hitting. I loved the simple baseball games, like that Play Station game from the late 1990s. However, when I left Germany (and my first stint in the Army) I gave the system to a friend of mine in our sister unit of 2-6 Cav. I think I still have the game hanging around somewhere, and if it still plays in the current systems, I might dust it off and play it again!
    "It ain't braggin' if you can do it!" Dizzy Dean

    "There's no question in my mind that the best club I ever played with was the happily efficient Cardinal team of 1931." Frankie Frisch

    "I've seen a lot of great ballclubs in my day, but for pitching, hitting, spirit, and all-around balance, I would back my 1931 Cardinal team against any of them." Gabby Street

  8. #58
    for me it was the opposite. I stopped playing Computer games when you needed a Manual and Multi day missions..

    For me that was too complicated I just wanted to Switch it on, Play for half an hour and then Switch it off.
    I think walks are overrated unless you can run. If you get a walk and put the pitcher in a stretch, that helps, but the guy who walks and cant run, most of the time hes clogging up the bases for somebody who can run. Dusty Baker.

  9. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by dominik View Post
    for me it was the opposite. I stopped playing Computer games when you needed a Manual and Multi day missions..

    For me that was too complicated I just wanted to Switch it on, Play for half an hour and then Switch it off.
    Me too. I preferred the linear style of games. They were quick, fun, easy, and didn't waste hours of your life.
    1885 1886 1926 1931 1934 1942 1944 1946 1964 1967 1982 2006 2011

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  10. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by dominik View Post
    for me it was the opposite. I stopped playing Computer games when you needed a Manual and Multi day missions..

    For me that was too complicated I just wanted to Switch it on, Play for half an hour and then Switch it off.
    I don't waste any time playing games anymore, and I never got on with those ridiculous games that take count the hours or days wasted playing them. I had those two baseball games I liked, and when I was a kid I played the Mario games (really only liked the third one) and Contra (my little brother and I would play together). If I could play that simple baseball game from 1997 or 1998 (whichever it was, I think it was 1997 but I got it in 1998 or 1999), I would spend the money on a used system. It was far less complicated than the crap I tried playing in 2005.

    My son will be playing those kind of systems before I know it, then I will have my mind blown on whatever these new video games are doing and/or looking like.
    "It ain't braggin' if you can do it!" Dizzy Dean

    "There's no question in my mind that the best club I ever played with was the happily efficient Cardinal team of 1931." Frankie Frisch

    "I've seen a lot of great ballclubs in my day, but for pitching, hitting, spirit, and all-around balance, I would back my 1931 Cardinal team against any of them." Gabby Street

  11. #61
    Quote Originally Posted by Bothrops Atrox View Post
    Me too. I preferred the linear style of games. They were quick, fun, easy, and didn't waste hours of your life.
    now we have more time to waste it here arguing with guys hating WAR.
    I think walks are overrated unless you can run. If you get a walk and put the pitcher in a stretch, that helps, but the guy who walks and cant run, most of the time hes clogging up the bases for somebody who can run. Dusty Baker.

  12. #62
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    I posted this in the Hall of Fame forum's John Tudor thread. It is the entries in John Snyder's Cardinals Journal (2005) about John Tudor over the years 1985-1990. This isn't every start, nor is it just all of his good starts. There appear to be numerous amazing starts here by Tudor, many 2 or 3-hitters, tons (not all, though) of his shutouts, a no-hitter that he was taken out after 68 pitches in 6 innings (strict pitch count due to recovering from one of his many, many injuries), the next start where he went another 7 no-hit innings, postseason glory (and defeats), trades, etc.

    John Tudor was one of the finest pitchers this franchise has ever had the privilege of having on the hill for us - especially in Busch Stadium, The House of Tudor! Check out his stretch from June 1, 1985 through June 23, 1988. Incredible doesn't do it any justice.

    1984

    December 12 - The Cardinals trade George Hendrick and Steve Barnard to the Pirates for John Tudor and Brian Harper.

    Hendrick was 35 when the Cardinals traded him, and he declined rapidly after leaving St. Louis. He was never again an everyday player and hit just .243 over the remaining four seasons of his career. Tudor, on the other hand, was brilliant, posting a record of 62-26 in five seasons as a Cardinal, including 35-9 at Busch Stadium. His .705 winning percentage is the best of any pitcher in club history with at least 60 decisions.

    1985

    June 8 - Tom Herr hits a homer off Tom Gorman in the ninth inning for the lone run in a 1-0 triumph over the Mets in New York. John Tudor pitched the shutout.

    June 23 - John Tudor pitches a two-hitter to defeat the Cubs 7-0 at Busch Stadium. The only Chicago hits were singles by Steve Lake in the third inning and Ryne Sandberg in the fourth.

    Tudor had an extraordinary season in 1985, his first as a Cardinal. He had a 1-7 record on May 30. A high school friend who had been following Tudor on cable television noticed the Cardinal hurler wasn't freezing his front leg long enough before delivering the ball to the plate, thus causing the leg to arrive well before his arm released the ball. Tudor corrected the problem, and over the remainder of the regular season, he won 20 of 21 decisions to finish the year with a 21-8 record and a 1.93 ERA in 275 innings. Tudor also led the league in shutouts with 10. The only Cardinal pitcher in the modern era with more shutouts was Bob Gibson, who had 13 in 1968. While posting a 20-1 record after May 30, Tudor's ERA was a remarkable 1.37.

    August 8 - John Tudor pitches a one-hitter to defeat the Cubs 8-0 at Busch Stadium. The only Chicago hit was a single by Leon Durham in the fifth inning.

    September 1 - John Tudor pitches a shutout to defeat the Astros 5-0 at Busch Stadium.

    September 6 - John Tudor pitches his second consecutive shutout, defeating the Braves 8-0 in Atlanta. Cesar Cedeno hit a pinch-hit grand slam off Gene Garber in the sixth inning.

    September 11 - John Tudor needs 10 innings to pitch his third consecutive shutout, beating the Mets 1-0 in New York. Cesar Cedeno provided the lone run of the game with a home run off Jesse Orosco on an 0-2 pitch leading off the tenth.

    Tudor pitched 31 consecutive scoreless innings in four starts from September 1 through September 16.

    September 26 - John Tudor records his 20th win and 10th shutout of 1985 with a 5-0 decision over the Phillies at Busch Stadium. It was also Tudor's 10th consecutive victory.

    John Tudor and Joaquin Andujar were the first Cardinal teammates to win at least 20 games in the same season since Mort Cooper and Johnny Beazley accomplished the feat in 1942. No two pitchers have won 20 in the same season in St. Louis since 1985.

    October 1 - In the showdown for the NL East pennant, the Mets cut the Cardinals' lead to two games with an 11-inning, 1-0 win at Busch Stadium. Darryl Strawberry rocketed a homer off Ken Dayley in the eleventh for the lone run of the game. The ball struck the digital clock in the right field stands. John Tudor pitched 10 shutout innings. Ron Darling (nine innings) and Jesse Orosco (two innings) threw for the Mets.

    October 5 - The Cardinals clinch the pennant with a 7-1 win over the Cubs at Busch Stadium. John Tudor was the winning pitcher, earning his eleventh consecutive victory.

    October 9 - The Cardinals open the NLCS with a 4-1 loss to the Dodgers in Los Angeles. John Tudor, who won 20 of his last 21 regular-season decisions, was the losing pitcher, surrendering four runs in 5 2/3 innings. Fernando Valenzuela was the winner with relief help from Tom Niedenfuer.

    October 13 - The Cardinals even the series by scoring nine runs in the second inning and routing the Dodgers 12-2 before 53,708 at Busch Stadium. Tito Landrum, who replaced Vince Coleman in left field, collected four hits in five at-bats and drove in three runs. Jack Clark collected three hits, and John Tudor was the winning pitcher.

    October 19 - The Cardinals win Game One of the 1985 World Series 3-1 over the Royals in Kansas City. After the Royals took a 1-0 lead in the second inning, the Cardinals scored single runs in the third, sixth, and ninth innings. John Tudor pitched 6 2/3 innings for the victory. Todd Worrell earned the save with 2 1/3 innings of relief.

    October 23 - The Cardinals pull within one game of the World Championship with a 3-0 win over the Royals before 53,634 at Busch Stadium. John Tudor pitched the five-hit shutout. Tito Landrum hit a solo homer in the second inning, and Willie McGee added another one in the third.

    October 27 - Still seething over the Game Six loss, the Cardinals lose Game Seven 11-0 to the Royals in Kansas City. It was over in a hurry, as the Royals scored two runs in the second inning, three in the third, and six in the fifth. John Tudor, making his third start of the series, was relieved in the third. He angrily smashed an electric fan in the dugout and opened a nasty gash in his left hand that required stitches. In the fateful fifth, the Cardinals used five pitchers. Joaquin Andujar and Whitey Herzog were both ejected arguing the ball and strike calls of home plate umpire Don Denkinger, who had blown the call at first the previous evening. Bret Saberhagen pitched the shutout.

    1986

    April 12 - John Tudor wins his 18th consecutive regular-season game at Busch Stadium over two seasons with a 6-3 decision over the Expos.

    April 18 - Two days after the United States bombs Libya in response to terrorist attacks, John Tudor wins his 15th consecutive regular-season game with a 4-2 decision over the Expos in Montreal.

    Tudor had a regular-season record of 23-1 from June 1, 1985, through April 18, 1986.

    June 7 - John Tudor pitches a two-hitter to defeat the Cubs 3-2 at Busch Stadium. The only Chicago hits were a homer by Ryne Sandberg in the fourth inning and Bob Dernier in the fifth.

    1987

    April 7 - In the opening game of the season, the Cardinals defeat the Cubs 9-3 in Chicago. Tito Landrum collects three hits in three at-bats. John Tudor was the winning pitcher, with help from Bill Dawley, who pitched four innings in relief.

    April 19 - On Easter Sunday, John Tudor is injured in a freak accident during a 4-2 win over the Mets at Busch Stadium. Mets catcher Barry Lyons ran into the Cardinal dugout in pursuit of a foul pop and landed on Tudor, breaking a bone below the pitcher's right kneecap. Ironically, Tudor was hurt attempting to protect Lyons. He could have gotten out of the way in time to avoid the collision but saw that Lyons was going headfirst into the bench and tried to block his path. Tudor was out for three and a half months.

    The Cardinals won 95 games in 1987, but no individual pitcher won more than 11. The leading winners on the Cardinals were Bob Forsch (11-7), Danny Cox (11-9), and Greg Mathews (11-11). John Tudor went 10-2.

    October 13 - The Cardinals stave off elimination by beating the Giants 1-0 in Game Six before 55,231 at Busch Stadium. John Tudor (7 1/3 innings), Todd Worrell (1 inning), and Ken Dayley (2/3 of an inning) combined on the shutout. Dave Dravecky, who two-hit the Cards in Game Two, was the hard-luck losing pitcher. The lone run of the game scored in the second inning. Tony Pena led off with a triple that Giants right fielder Candy Maldonado lost in the lights. One out later, Jose Oquendo hit a sacrifice fly. Worrell started the ninth with a strikeout against Will Clark, but Whitey Herzog brought in lefty Ken Dayley to face left-handed batter Harry Spilman and switch-hitter Jose Uribe. Worrell moved to right field in case he was needed for one more batter. He wasn't. Dayley retired Chris Speier, who was batting for Spilman, and Uribe to seal the victory.

    October 20 - The Cardinals finally win a game in the 1987 World Series by defeating the Twins 3-1 before 55,347 at Busch Stadium in Game Three. All three runs scored in the seventh inning to erase a 1-0 deficit. Vince Coleman drove in the first two runs with a single, stole second, and scored on an Ozzie Smith single. John Tudor pitched seven innings for the win, and Todd Worrell went the final two frames for the save.

    1988

    May 1 - John Tudor (six innings) and Scott Terry (three innings) combine on a one-hitter to defeat the Dodgers 9-0 at Los Angeles. Tudor was taken out of the game with a no-hitter in progress. He was still recovering from a shoulder injury and was on a 75-pitch limit. At the end of the sixth, Tudor had thrown 68 pitches. The only Dodger hit was Kirk Gibson's single off Terry in the seventh inning.

    From June 1, 1985, through June 23, 1988, Tudor had a 47-12 won-lost record and a 2.28 ERA in 608 1/3 innings.


    May 7 - John Tudor extends his streak of consecutive no-hit innings to 13 in beating the Dodgers 2-1 at Busch Stadium. After throwing six no-hit innings on May 1, Tudor didn't allow any hits over the first seven innings of the May 7 start. Mike Marshall collected the first Los Angeles hit with a single to lead off the eighth inning. Two more hits led to a run, which tied the score 1-1. The Cardinals won the contest in the ninth inning on Tom Brunansky's walk-off single.

    May 17 - The Cardinals score three runs in the eleventh to beat the Cubs 3-0 in Chicago. Luis Alicea's two-out, two-run single took a bad hop and broke the 0-0 tie. John Tudor (nine innings), Scott Terry (one inning), and Todd Worrell (one inning) combined on a three-hit shutout.

    June 23 - John Tudor pitches a two-hitter to beat the Phillies 2-0 at Busch Stadium. The only Philadelphia hits were singles by Steve Jeltz in the third inning and Bob Dernier in the ninth.

    July 4 - John Tudor shoves his glove into an ABC-TV cameraman's lens in the Cardinals dugout after being taken out for a reliever during a 5-3 loss to the Dodgers in Los Angeles. Tudor apologized the following day.

    August 10 - John Tudor pitches the Cardinals to a 1-0 win over the Phillies in Philadelphia. Terry Pendleton drove in the only run with a single in the first inning.

    August 16 - The Cardinals trade John Tudor to the Dodgers for Pedro Guerrero.

    After Bob Horner failed to work out following Jack Clark's trip to the Yankees as a free agent, the Cards were in desperate need of a slugging first baseman. Guerrero was 32 years old and had declined from his peak with the Dodgers, but he started for the Cardinals at first base until 1991 and gave the club one great year, 1989, when he batted .311 with 17 homers, 117 RBIs, and a league-leading 42 doubles. Injuries prevented Tudor from being effective in Los Angeles. He returned to the Cardinals as a free agent in 1990.

    1989

    December 14 - The Cardinals sign John Tudor as a free agent after his stint with the Dodgers.

    Tudor pitched only 14 1/3 innings in 1989 because of elbow, shoulder, and knee injuries, each of which required surgery. He was 12-4 with a 2.40 ERA for the Cardinals in 1990 but retired at the end of the season, at age 36, because the accumulating injuries had robbed him of his fastball and he wanted to leave the game as a success.
    "It ain't braggin' if you can do it!" Dizzy Dean

    "There's no question in my mind that the best club I ever played with was the happily efficient Cardinal team of 1931." Frankie Frisch

    "I've seen a lot of great ballclubs in my day, but for pitching, hitting, spirit, and all-around balance, I would back my 1931 Cardinal team against any of them." Gabby Street

  13. #63
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    Tom Herr's 2 RBI sacrifice fly in the second inning of Game 4 during the 1982 World Series. The Brewer pitcher is Moose Haas, Willie McGee is on 3B, Ozzie Smith on 2B. Herr's long fly ball to CF was hit to Stormin' Gorman Thomas. Ted Simmons is the Brewer catcher. Got the video off youtube, it isn't the best quality but it does show the unusual 2 RBI sac fly. Enjoy!

    "It ain't braggin' if you can do it!" Dizzy Dean

    "There's no question in my mind that the best club I ever played with was the happily efficient Cardinal team of 1931." Frankie Frisch

    "I've seen a lot of great ballclubs in my day, but for pitching, hitting, spirit, and all-around balance, I would back my 1931 Cardinal team against any of them." Gabby Street

  14. #64
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    Some interviews after the clinching Game 7 of the Suds Series in '82:

    "It ain't braggin' if you can do it!" Dizzy Dean

    "There's no question in my mind that the best club I ever played with was the happily efficient Cardinal team of 1931." Frankie Frisch

    "I've seen a lot of great ballclubs in my day, but for pitching, hitting, spirit, and all-around balance, I would back my 1931 Cardinal team against any of them." Gabby Street

  15. #65
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    Clinching game highlights from the 1967 Series:

    "It ain't braggin' if you can do it!" Dizzy Dean

    "There's no question in my mind that the best club I ever played with was the happily efficient Cardinal team of 1931." Frankie Frisch

    "I've seen a lot of great ballclubs in my day, but for pitching, hitting, spirit, and all-around balance, I would back my 1931 Cardinal team against any of them." Gabby Street

  16. #66
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    Just started watching this on youtube, good stuff so far:

    "It ain't braggin' if you can do it!" Dizzy Dean

    "There's no question in my mind that the best club I ever played with was the happily efficient Cardinal team of 1931." Frankie Frisch

    "I've seen a lot of great ballclubs in my day, but for pitching, hitting, spirit, and all-around balance, I would back my 1931 Cardinal team against any of them." Gabby Street

  17. #67
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    Ordered a couple books off Amazon today, one of which is about former Cardinal players and what they are up to today. The book was published in 2013 I think, might be mixing it up in my head with the date from the other one (on Cardinal history, of course), but it looked real recent when I ordered it. Some of the names included are:

    Dick Groat
    Ernie Broglio
    Vince Coleman
    John Tudor
    Bob Tewksbury

    That is just a few of them, there are a lot in the book. So far, what I could see from the blurb on the book, it seems Tewk is working on his Master's in Sports Psychology, Vince is coaching, and Groat is working in basketball. I can't wait to see this book!
    "It ain't braggin' if you can do it!" Dizzy Dean

    "There's no question in my mind that the best club I ever played with was the happily efficient Cardinal team of 1931." Frankie Frisch

    "I've seen a lot of great ballclubs in my day, but for pitching, hitting, spirit, and all-around balance, I would back my 1931 Cardinal team against any of them." Gabby Street

  18. #68
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    I was just ragging on Jack Clark, again, for his comments about Albert Pujols. I joke around about The Ripper all the time, and there is plenty of evidence that the man sure can say stupid things, but I still will always hold a special place for the memories he provided as our lone power man from 1985-1987 (when he wasn't injured, which he was every damn year with us). I love the bottom photo of those three great Cardinal first basemen during my lifetime.

    Ripper.jpg

    JackClark_display_image.jpg

    Jack Clark photo.jpg

    jack-clark-louis-cardinals-road-grey-autographed-photograph-3392424.jpg

    cardinals-hernandez-pujols-clark.jpg
    "It ain't braggin' if you can do it!" Dizzy Dean

    "There's no question in my mind that the best club I ever played with was the happily efficient Cardinal team of 1931." Frankie Frisch

    "I've seen a lot of great ballclubs in my day, but for pitching, hitting, spirit, and all-around balance, I would back my 1931 Cardinal team against any of them." Gabby Street

  19. #69
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    I was just reading about Dal Maxvill, former World Series champ with us back in '64 and '67 and the GM from 1985-1995, in the book Where Have You Gone? - by Rob Rains with Keith Schildroth - and he was talking about the budget issues while the GM in the early 1990s. Gussie Busch used brewery money, I have read, to help bolster the team in the past, but after his passing his son (another August Busch) didn't want to use Anheuser-Busch cash on baseball pitchers. He specifically mentioned a pitcher who was very interested in pitching for the Cardinals in 1993, but Dal wasn't allowed to make a competitive offer at the time, so Greg Maddux took the Braves' money. . .

    The Redbirds were actually pretty good in '93 (87-75), and I think Greg may have been able to earn back the brewery's money over the course of that contract. I get upset when reading about those years, under that owner.
    "It ain't braggin' if you can do it!" Dizzy Dean

    "There's no question in my mind that the best club I ever played with was the happily efficient Cardinal team of 1931." Frankie Frisch

    "I've seen a lot of great ballclubs in my day, but for pitching, hitting, spirit, and all-around balance, I would back my 1931 Cardinal team against any of them." Gabby Street

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