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Thread: A-Rod Is Out, But He's Still Not the Worst Offender

  1. #1

    A-Rod Is Out, But He's Still Not the Worst Offender

    Alex Rodriguez is suspended for the year, but an even worse offender will continue to have his job and get paid until he retires.

    http://voices.yahoo.com/a-rod-out-bu...00.html?cat=14
    Last edited by JPS; 01-16-2014 at 01:18 AM.

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by JPS View Post
    Alex Rodriguez is suspended for the year, but an even worse offender will continue to have his job and get paid until he retires.

    http://voices.yahoo.com/a-rod-out-bu...00.html?cat=14
    Join the club, those that place the blame for anyone who made a choice to use, blame others. MLB,owners, managers and coaches for not speaking up, the fans who loved all the offense and now some fans turn on the users...................did we leave anyone out.

    Arod made a choice, the wrong choice. It's all on him, now he pays like some others, was it really all worth it.

  3. #3
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    I guess I'll just keep posting this until somebody gets it:

    Scott Pelley: Are you saying that Alex Rodriguez and or his associates were involved in threatening to kill Tony Bosch?

    Rob Manfred: The individual that was of greatest concern to Mr. Bosch was a known associate of Mr. Rodriguez.


    Unless Selig has done something worse than this, he's not "the worst offender".
    "Tactics were resorted to, unworthy of fair, manly players" - Brooklyn Eagle, June 12,1890

  4. #4
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    I'd like to know more about this myself. Physical threats by the ARod camp would take this to a whole new level of scuminess.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Toledo Inquisition View Post
    I'd like to know more about this myself. Physical threats by the ARod camp would take this to a whole new level of scuminess.
    I doubt we'll find anything out of substance. I don't doubt there have been threats of physical violence. But that's a far cry from pinning anything of that nature on Rodriguez, who still has plenty of fans and is hardly responsible for the actions of them. Unless A-Rod himself is contacting hitmen or guiding his cronies, I'm not going to add that to the laundry list.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Captain Cold Nose View Post
    I doubt we'll find anything out of substance. I don't doubt there have been threats of physical violence. But that's a far cry from pinning anything of that nature on Rodriguez, who still has plenty of fans and is hardly responsible for the actions of them. Unless A-Rod himself is contacting hitmen or guiding his cronies, I'm not going to add that to the laundry list.
    Rob Manfred: The individual that was of greatest concern to Mr. Bosch was a known associate of Mr. Rodriguez.

    So not some anonymous fan acting independently.
    "Tactics were resorted to, unworthy of fair, manly players" - Brooklyn Eagle, June 12,1890

  7. #7
    Maybe Alex Rodriguez got so wrapped up in his celebrity and fame that he thought he was entitled to do basically anything, including taking steroids, and maybe even looking into having someone 'rubbed out.' I mean you can just look no further than what Courtney Love had done to Kurt Cobain, so we know it does happen. That's only one high-profile example.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seattle1 View Post
    Maybe Alex Rodriguez got so wrapped up in his celebrity and fame that he thought he was entitled to do basically anything, including taking steroids, and maybe even looking into having someone 'rubbed out.' I mean you can just look no further than what Courtney Love had done to Kurt Cobain, so we know it does happen. That's only one high-profile example.
    We've just had the 20th anniversary of Nancy Kerrigan/Tonya Harding also. Tons of historical examples also - when Henry II of England complained to his knights about St. Thomas Becket and wondered aloud why his knights still permitted him to be treated that way. His knights knew what that meant, and St. Thomas Becket was martyred.

    When people are beholden to someone, non-direct commands can be given and carried out. I'm not saying for sure ARod did that, but it should be looked at.

  9. #9
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    Not to defend A-Rod, but A-Rod only enabled himself. Selig enabled (or at least was the lead enabler) of an entire generation of players.

    And he's getting paid almost as much as A-Rod to do it.

    I don't know, there are certainly no heroes to be found here, but I certainly will join in with any ire anyone wants to direct at Selig.
    Found in a fortune cookie On Thursday, August 18th, 2005: "Hard words break no bones, Kind words butter no parsnips."

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  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by toomanyhatz View Post
    Not to defend A-Rod, but A-Rod only enabled himself. Selig enabled (or at least was the lead enabler) of an entire generation of players.

    And he's getting paid almost as much as A-Rod to do it.

    I don't know, there are certainly no heroes to be found here, but I certainly will join in with any ire anyone wants to direct at Selig.
    Stop the nonsense with Selig being the mass enabler.
    All the BS about Selig, some players using because others were using, the fans loving all the offense then turning on the users when exposed, all the excuses.
    Come on, the user made the choice. So many are all fault, everyone but the user himself, is that your take on the PED use, your dreaming.

  11. #11
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    You're sure assuming a lot about what I'm saying.

    Did you see Selig on the stand? Was he being completely honest? Or was he throwing the players under the bus? He hemmed and hawed like Reagan being questioned about Iran/Contra.

    The players are absolutely responsible for their own use. I never said different. In fact I've said exactly that. Repeatedly.

    The commissioner has traditionally seen his position as being the moral arbiter for the public face of baseball. Every scandal that has ever plagued the game, the commissioner has always taken a stand, for right or wrong. Selig, the public face of the game, was on the wrong side of this one. For many, many years. You can question how Landis handled integration, how Kuhn handled...pretty much everything, how Giamatti handled Rose, etc. But NO commissioner has made such an art of backpedaling.

    If you want to give some examples of moves that Selig has made that actually helped preserve the integrity of the game, please make them. But the players being wrong doesn't make anyone else- and particularly not Selig, who was in a position to discipline them- right.
    Found in a fortune cookie On Thursday, August 18th, 2005: "Hard words break no bones, Kind words butter no parsnips."

    1955 1959 1963 1965 1981 1988

  12. #12
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    Selig and MLB were not the enablers. It was the MLBPA and their do-or-die stance in direct opposition to drug testing. It took Congress to bludgeon them out of that position.
    Buck O'Neil: The Monarch of Baseball

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by ol' aches and pains View Post
    I guess I'll just keep posting this until somebody gets it:

    Scott Pelley: Are you saying that Alex Rodriguez and or his associates were involved in threatening to kill Tony Bosch?

    Rob Manfred: The individual that was of greatest concern to Mr. Bosch was a known associate of Mr. Rodriguez.


    And I will agree with you 100% in which A-Roid makes me look like less of a horrible person.

    Unless Selig has done something worse than this, he's not "the worst offender".
    Quote Originally Posted by Seattle1 View Post
    Maybe Alex Rodriguez got so wrapped up in his celebrity and fame that he thought he was entitled to do basically anything, including taking steroids, and maybe even looking into having someone 'rubbed out.' I mean you can just look no further than what Courtney Love had done to Kurt Cobain, so we know it does happen. That's only one high-profile example.
    And this is why. He was caught up being Mr. Roboto celebrity with no personality and had "handlers" who did everything for him. Who knows if his handlers were dirty, and judging from his Dominican family, his Dominican family (I believe his mother's side of the family) were very corrupt as in "by any means necessary". A-Rod probably thought said person could kill Bosch and cover it up, by making sure he wasn't connected to the death.

    From what I've been told thru the grapevine, A-Rod is not very smart when it comes to common sense, and this comes with people who have played with him or against him that either continue to play or that no longer play.

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by toomanyhatz View Post
    You're sure assuming a lot about what I'm saying.

    Did you see Selig on the stand? Was he being completely honest? Or was he throwing the players under the bus? He hemmed and hawed like Reagan being questioned about Iran/Contra.

    The players are absolutely responsible for their own use. I never said different. In fact I've said exactly that. Repeatedly.

    The commissioner has traditionally seen his position as being the moral arbiter for the public face of baseball. Every scandal that has ever plagued the game, the commissioner has always taken a stand, for right or wrong. Selig, the public face of the game, was on the wrong side of this one. For many, many years. You can question how Landis handled integration, how Kuhn handled...pretty much everything, how Giamatti handled Rose, etc. But NO commissioner has made such an art of backpedaling.

    If you want to give some examples of moves that Selig has made that actually helped preserve the integrity of the game, please make them. But the players being wrong doesn't make anyone else- and particularly not Selig, who was in a position to discipline them- right.
    Selig doesn't have to right about anything dealing with the only issue here, Arod using and being punished, that the whole issue.

  15. #15
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    The thread's about steroid use in baseball, not A-Rod's steroid use.

    And again, I repeat- I have not defended A-Rod in the slightest, or said he shouldn't be punished. Not once.
    Found in a fortune cookie On Thursday, August 18th, 2005: "Hard words break no bones, Kind words butter no parsnips."

    1955 1959 1963 1965 1981 1988

  16. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Nutt View Post
    And this is why. He was caught up being Mr. Roboto celebrity with no personality and had "handlers" who did everything for him. Who knows if his handlers were dirty, and judging from his Dominican family, his Dominican family (I believe his mother's side of the family) were very corrupt as in "by any means necessary". A-Rod probably thought said person could kill Bosch and cover it up, by making sure he wasn't connected to the death.

    From what I've been told thru the grapevine, A-Rod is not very smart when it comes to common sense, and this comes with people who have played with him or against him that either continue to play or that no longer play.
    In plain English, he has to be a dummy. He admits the first time, seems contrite. And what does he do, he goes right back, he gets what he deserves.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by KCGHOST View Post
    Selig and MLB were not the enablers. It was the MLBPA and their do-or-die stance in direct opposition to drug testing. It took Congress to bludgeon them out of that position.
    This the most most spot on post I've ever seen. Concise, to the point, and complete truth.
    "Everyone left here, but I remain at my post, documenting my sports writers and photos. I don't do Ty Cobb anymore. I did for him everything I could do. Work will live on. Personalities will fade.

    Fever members come and go. Not relevant. Your documentations will live FOREVER, my brother. That outweighs all the Fever jack-asses. Ignore what you must, document all you can."
    - Bill Burgess

  18. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by KCGHOST View Post
    Selig and MLB were not the enablers. It was the MLBPA and their do-or-die stance in direct opposition to drug testing. It took Congress to bludgeon them out of that position.
    Some people don't want to hear it.
    Coming out of the woods to lay blame on so many others, everyone except the one responsible, the user.

    I really wonder what the clean players really think about competing for years with the users boosting their stats, taking the field with them.
    I'm sure most of them go easy with their statements, they are teammates and friends in some cases.

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