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Thread: K% instead of K9?

  1. #1

    K% instead of K9?

    Fangraphs is lobbying to use k% instead of k/9. They are arguing that k/9 is not great because it is inflated with higher walks guys since they have more PAs per inning and thus more chances to strike guys out.

    I tend to agree with that but k/9 is still much more widespread. Should we use k% based on plate appearances?
    I now have my own non commercial blog about training for batspeed and power using my training experience in baseball and track and field.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by dominik View Post
    Fangraphs is lobbying to use k% instead of k/9. They are arguing that k/9 is not great because it is inflated with higher walks guys since they have more PAs per inning and thus more chances to strike guys out.

    I tend to agree with that but k/9 is still much more widespread. Should we use k% based on plate appearances?
    k as a % of what? Outs?
    "Batting stats and pitching stats do not indicate the quality of play, merely which part of that struggle is dominant at the moment."

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  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by sturg1dj View Post
    k as a % of what? Outs?
    Plate appearances (batters faced)
    I now have my own non commercial blog about training for batspeed and power using my training experience in baseball and track and field.

  4. #4
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    Hmmmm....

    That's like preferring batting average over... (hits per 4.25 plate appearances?).

    K% would certainly penalize pitchers with high walk rates. The denominator would go up, sure.

    But isn't easier to think of some numbers in terms of a GAME rather than in terms of a typical plate appearance?

    We aren't making playing cards for a tabletop board game are we?
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    Garvey, Lopes, Russell, and Cey started 833 times and the Dodgers went 498-335, for a .598 winning percentage. Thatís equal to a team going 97-65 over a season. On those occasions when at least one of them missed his start, the Dodgers were 306-267-1, which is a .534 clip. That works out to a team going 87-75. So having all four of them added 10 wins to the Dodgers per year.
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