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Thread: Yes/ No/ Maybe Hall of Fame, 1947 election

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sockeye View Post
    Due to LQ adjustments and missing data I don't have negro leaguers or Japanese players in my personal HOF. However for the purpose of this project it only make sense to use the greatest player list which looks at NL, JL, ML & PCL players. So it is a much more inclusive list.
    Why do you feel there is enough statistical evidence to rank Jud Wilson exactly 111th, but not enough statistical evidence to put him in your HOF? It seems like it would take even MORE objective evidence to give a player a precise ranking than to say Y or N to the HOF.
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  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by PVNICK View Post

    Rice, Grantland - yes, what exactly is the No argument is it that he also wrote about college football? He was the first radio broadcaster for the WS, wrote for the NY Herald Tribune during the McGraw Mathewson era and as far as I know was the premier sportswriter during an age when baseball was king.
    Actually, my no vote is premised on the idea no one who isn't influencing policy or running a team has sufficient influence on the game to merit being in a Hall of Fame.
    Seen on a bumper sticker: If only closed minds came with closed mouths.
    Some minds are like concrete--thoroughly mixed up and permanently set.
    A Lincoln: I don't think much of a man who is not wiser today than he was yesterday.

  3. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by PVNICK View Post
    Rice, Grantland - yes, what exactly is the No argument is it that he also wrote about college football? He was the first radio broadcaster for the WS, wrote for the NY Herald Tribune during the McGraw Mathewson era and as far as I know was the premier sportswriter during an age when baseball was king.
    What exactly is the yes argument? How did he impact the game? Did he help establish a new set of statistics or way to analyze games and players? Did he in some way impact a rule change or break a color barrier? He was a great writer. There is an award in place for that already.

  4. #24
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    Somehow on the contributors I was a little too loose and dim on the specifics. So "major figure" yes, but I guess no more impactful on the on field product than the broadcasters who will come in the future. Remind me of this if I pull a "HOW COME NOONE IS VOTING FOR (Red Barber/Mel Allen/Harry Carey/Vin Scully/Roger Angell etc)

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by jjpm74 View Post
    What exactly is the yes argument? How did he impact the game? Did he help establish a new set of statistics or way to analyze games and players? Did he in some way impact a rule change or break a color barrier? He was a great writer. There is an award in place for that already.
    Yeah, a Bill James with his popularization of sabermetrics makes it for me, Al Elias for compiling so many stats and popularizing the use of some of them, and a David Neft as the creator of the modern Baseball Encyclopedia (the first MacMillan), whose work sabermetrics and research to flourish are good examples of what I'm looking for for guys whose influence was mostly outside of leagues or teams. You could count Chadwick and the latter Spink for wide influence on the form of the game including rules. Grantland Rice was a fine writer, but I have to second jjpm's questions about him in terms of voting for this or any other Hall.
    Seen on a bumper sticker: If only closed minds came with closed mouths.
    Some minds are like concrete--thoroughly mixed up and permanently set.
    A Lincoln: I don't think much of a man who is not wiser today than he was yesterday.

  6. #26
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    Just over a day and a half left in this election as I type this.
    Seen on a bumper sticker: If only closed minds came with closed mouths.
    Some minds are like concrete--thoroughly mixed up and permanently set.
    A Lincoln: I don't think much of a man who is not wiser today than he was yesterday.

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