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Thread: Early Negro Teams & Players

  1. #26
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    1939 Homestead Grays in front of their team bus.
    Back row: Josh Gibson, Edsall Walker, David Whatley, Roy Welmaker, Arnold Waite, Henry Spearman, Raymond Brown, James Williams, Robert Gaston, Roy Partlow.
    Front row: Jerry Benjamin, Speck Roberts, Lewis Dula, Vic Harris, Buck Leonard, Sam Bankhead, Jelly Jackson.

  2. #27
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    Ed "Ace" Stone

    Born: August 21, 1910 in Black Cat, Delaware
    Died: April 11, 1983 in the Bronx, NY
    Ht:6'-0", Wt: 195
    Batted both and threw right
    Position: outfield
    Years: 1931-1950
    Teams: Wilmington Hornets, Atlantic City Bacharachs, Brooklyn Eagles, Newark Eagles, Philadelphia Stars, New York Black Yankees, Pittsburgh Crawfords, Kansas City Monarchs, Nuevo Laredo Owls (Mexico), Veracruz Red Eagles (Mexico), Torreon Cotton Dealers (Mexico),Mexico City Red Devils, Havana Lions (Cuba
    Last edited by JACKIE42; 06-07-2005 at 10:52 AM.

  3. #28
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    Baseball players from Morris Brown College , Atlanta, Georgia- 1899, or 1900.
    Last edited by JACKIE42; 06-25-2005 at 09:02 AM.

  4. #29
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    "The first photo features three players with the New York Cubans and it includes Ray Dandridge in the center. The second is a nine-member pose of the Memphis Red Sox with Willie Wells in the center. And the third photo in this group evidently seizes a milestone moment for those Red Sox as it projects two unidentified executives while including Willie Wells Jr. and Willie Wells Sr".
    Last edited by JACKIE42; 07-03-2005 at 07:51 AM.

  5. #30
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    To ALL of Jackie's wonderful (and incredible finds) photos of the NL, I like to add this one I found of BUCK LEONARD on eBay...



    c.

  6. #31
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    Jackie42, you've outdone yourself, which by my standards, is so difficult to do. Truest of praises are in order!
    Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting. 2007-11 CBA
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  7. #32
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    Here is one photo of a player I believe there is not yet a photo of on this thread, the great third baseman Oliver Marcelle:


  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mattingly
    Jackie42, you've outdone yourself, which by my standards, is so difficult to do. Truest of praises are in order!
    Thank you.

  9. #34
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    Last edited by JACKIE42; 07-13-2005 at 07:40 AM.

  10. #35
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    Oliver "The Ghost" Marcelle

    1895-1949
    By Bush Bernard
    Published in the Daily Comet in 1996


    The greatest third baseman to play in the Negro Leagues was born in Thibodaux.

    But Oliver "The Ghost" Marcelle never got the recognition due such a man during his lifetime and for 42 years his body laid buried in an unmarked grave in Denver. He was inducted into the Louisiana Sports Hall of Fame in 1996.

    "I think Ollie Marcelle was the best third baseman there was," said Bobbie Robinson, a fellow third baseman who played against Marcelle in the Negro Leagues.

    "He was colorful," Robinson said. "Some ball players, it just looks like they have more color when they take the field. I know he was one of the best."

    Oliver Marcelle was born June 24, 1895, in Thibodaux. He was the fifth of Daniel and Eliza Marcelle's six children, according to census records. He had an older brother, Johnny, and sisters, Elnora, Celestine, Ann and Cecilea, who was 2 years younger than Oliver.

    Little is known about his early life. John "Buck" O'Neil, a friend and former teammate who lives in Kansas City, said he didn't know Marcelle was from Thibodaux.

    "He always said he was from New Orleans," O'Neil said.

    His professional baseball career started in New Orleans, where he played for several teams during his teens. In 1918, he moved to Brooklyn where he played for the Brooklyn Royal Giants in 1918 and 1919.

    He soon gained recognition for his fielding abilities and his flair for the dramatic, said Jay Sanford, a sports historian who lives in a Denver suburb. His nickname, "The Ghost," came from his fielding style.

    He would stand 10 feet off the bag and wait for someone to hit a ball his way. He would run and leap, making the catch, Sanford said.

    "It didn't seem like he was much faster than the other guys," Robinson said. "He played deeper than I did. He was just colorful."

    "Ollie would play 10 feet closer to the batter than anyone else," Sanford said. "They'd shoot the ball at him and he'd catch it. He had cat-quick reaction."

    From 1920-23 Marcelle played with the Atlantic City Bacharach Giants, spent 1924 and part of 1925 with the New York Lincoln Giants, returned to Atlantic City in 1925 and stayed with them through 1928. He was part of the "Million Dollar" infield of the Baltimore Black Sox in 1929. He finished his playing career with the Brooklyn Royal Giants in 1930. His lifetime batting average was .305.

    Marcelle was a fierce competitor with an equally fierce temper.

    In a fight, "he'd hit you with whatever was available," Sanford said.

    Although he had other players' respect, he had few friends.

    Buck O'Neil is one of the few people who spoke kindly of Oliver Marcelle, Sanford said.

    "They liked him as a player, but not as a person," Sanford said. "He drank a lot and fought a lot."

    "When he drank he got nasty," Sanford said. "If he had a bat in his hand, he'd hit you with it. Even as an older man, living here in town, he'd get in fights in a crap game. It was like night and day."

    His temper ended his career early.

    During a fight over a craps game with a fellow player, Frank Warfield, in Cuba in 1929, Warfield bit off a piece of Marcelle's nose.

    Marcelle started wearing a black eye patch over his nose.

    "He was a proud, handsome guy, you know, and then he used to wear a black patch across his nose and he got so he couldn't play baseball any more," Bill Yancey, a player in the Negro Leagues, said in "Only the Ball was White," a book by Robert Peterson published in 1970.

    Sanford went to Marcelle's old neighborhood doing research and could find no one that remembered him as a baseball player.

    "I'd talk about baseball and get blank stares," Sanford said. "I'd talk about his nose, they'd say `The Patch.' "

    Marcelle quit playing in 1930. He coached for a while and in 1933 toured with the Miami Giants, ending up in Denver.

    His biggest contribution to baseball history didn't come as a player though.

    The Denver Post sponsored one of the biggest semipro baseball tournaments in the country. In 1934, Marcelle convinced the Post's sports editor that the paper should invite the Kansas City Monarchs, a black team, to the tournament.

    The Post invited the Monarchs, who had a pitcher by the name of Satchel Paige, who would later join the Hall of Fame.

    The tournament was Paige's first exposure to the white press. Sanford believes that Marcelle's prodding speeded up the integration of baseball.

    Prior to the 1934 tournament, Denver had black teams and white teams. The next year, Denver's baseball teams were integrated.

    "That was 11 years prior to Jackie Robinson," Sanford said.

    O'Neil, who played for the Monarchs, said the tournament was one of the best ever.

    "I'd played white teams before," he said. "But the Denver Post Tournament was one of the best."

    He said players didn't think of the tournament as a milestone in history at the time.

    "I don't think we thought about black and white as much, as far as everyone was concerned."

    Marcelle worked as a laborer for a while and continued to drink, Sanford said. He was estranged from his family, although his son, Ziggy, a former Southern University basketball star, also played in the Negro Leagues.

    Marcelle died penniless on June 12, 1949, two weeks before his 54th birthday. His death certificate lists the cause of death as heart disease.

    "His drinking caught up with him," Sanford said.

    Marcelle was buried in Denver's Riverside Cemetery in an unmarked pauper's grave.

    Sanford, a mortgage banker who formerly lived in New Orleans, said he'd heard about Marcelle during his studies of the Negro Leagues.

    When he heard he was buried in an unmarked grave, Sanford started an effort that involved the Zephyrs, a minor league team that later moved from Denver to New Orleans, and the Colorado Rockies and culminated with a ceremony on June 1, 1991, where Marcelle's tombstone was unveiled.

    The tombstone bears a quote from O'Neil: "Baseball's best Thirdbaseman brought professional baseball to Colorado."

    "I was glad to see they did this for Ollie," O'Neil said. "He was out there in an unmarked grave."

  11. #36
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    "Toward the twilight of that institution we know as the Negro Leagues, there emerged a nine called the Cleveland Buckeyes. Well actually, they didn't 'emerge,' but instead they were shifted from their long-successful tenure in Cincinnati. The latter-day Buckeyes first took the field in 1943, and actually enjoyed a couple good seasons on the strength of such superstars as Quincy Trouppe and Sam Jethro. But, as enlightenment pervaded Major League Baseball in the late '40's, so suffered the continuation of Negro League baseball in general, and the Cleveland Buckeyes took down their tent early in 1950".
    Last edited by JACKIE42; 07-16-2005 at 07:10 AM.

  12. #37
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    Great pennant, Jackie! Keeping with the theme of team memerobilia, here is a Memphis Red Sox hat:


  13. #38
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    A New York Cubans hat:


  14. #39
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    Detroit Stars hat:


  15. #40
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    More great photos. I also like the cap pictures as well.

    Jackie42, I happened across the article on Marcelle: http://lafourche.com/sports/ghost.htm
    Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting. 2007-11 CBA
    Rest very peacefully, John “Buck” O'Neil (1911-2006) & Philip Francis “Scooter” Rizzuto (1917-2007)
    THE BROOKLYN DODGERS - 1890 thru 1957
    Montreal Expos 1969 - 2004

  16. #41
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    New York Black Yankees hat:


  17. #42
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    Indianapolis ABCs hat:


  18. #43
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    Chicago American Giants hat:


  19. #44
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    1929, features Negro League all-star and Baseball Hall of Famer Willie Wells. . At the time this card was issued, Wells was a young shortstop playing for the St. Louis Stars of the Negro League. Wells led the league in hitting in 1929, batting .400, and again in 1930, averaging .409. The card identifies Wells along the base as "W. Wells" and also gives his position ("Short Stop") in white lettering.
    Last edited by JACKIE42; 07-20-2005 at 06:22 PM.

  20. #45
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    Indianapolis Clowns hat:


  21. #46
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    Homestead Grays hat:


  22. #47
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    The 1935 Pittsburgh Crawfords:


  23. #48
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    Pittsburgh Crawfords hat:


  24. #49
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    Brooklyn Royal Giants hat:



    Question, Jackie, do you remember ever going to a Brooklyn Royal Giants game? Did you watch them play?

  25. #50
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    Hilldale Daisies logo:


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