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Thread: Sicks' Stadium / Sick's Stadium

  1. #1

    Sicks' Stadium / Sick's Stadium

    Hello all.does anyone out there remmber going to sicks stadium to see the pilots in 1969 or to see baseball period at the old ballpark.lets hear from you. also checkout this site for some photos of old sicks stadium


    looking foward to hear from you all out there. Donald


    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/theoldballpark
    Last edited by POLO GROUNDS 1957; 05-20-2005 at 07:09 AM. Reason: spelling
    LONG LIVE THE POLO GROUNDS 1891-1964
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/POLOGROUNDS1962

  2. #2

    sicks stadium

    Here is a nice early photo of sicks stadium
    Attached Images Attached Images
    LONG LIVE THE POLO GROUNDS 1891-1964
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/POLOGROUNDS1962

  3. #3

    sicks stadium

    Here is a photo of the sicks stadium stands.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    LONG LIVE THE POLO GROUNDS 1891-1964
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/POLOGROUNDS1962

  4. #4
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    sicks stadium

    yup, caught a couple of games there in the summer of 1969, to see
    the Pilots play the Tigers...on the way to the California..to get some
    hippie love...heh,heh,heh..( I was 22 )

    jeez o'petes, sicks was probably one of the worst 'major'league stadiums
    of all time..sheer torture to see a game there..heck, it was just an old
    AA 0r AAA park, that was quickly and badly 'upgraded' to the majors,
    to house the new Pilots..until a future stadium was built..Always liked
    the Pilots..they had some real misfits on that team, like Jim Bouton,
    Gary Bell, Ray Oyler, etc...the seats in the park-were ratty old rusty
    seats, place stunk of grime, and the water pressure around the park,
    was almost zero..not a nice place..i can only imagine the state of the
    clubhouses....sheeeesh

  5. #5

    sicks stadium

    Quote Originally Posted by skeletor
    yup, caught a couple of games there in the summer of 1969, to see
    the Pilots play the Tigers...on the way to the California..to get some
    hippie love...heh,heh,heh..( I was 22 )

    jeez o'petes, sicks was probably one of the worst 'major'league stadiums
    of all time..sheer torture to see a game there..heck, it was just an old
    AA 0r AAA park, that was quickly and badly 'upgraded' to the majors,
    to house the new Pilots..until a future stadium was built..Always liked
    the Pilots..they had some real misfits on that team, like Jim Bouton,
    Gary Bell, Ray Oyler, etc...the seats in the park-were ratty old rusty
    seats, place stunk of grime, and the water pressure around the park,
    was almost zero..not a nice place..i can only imagine the state of the
    clubhouses....sheeeesh
    I also have heard alot of negative things about sicks stadium including the water pressure problems.i cant understand that the stadium was not ready for opening day of 1969. it was not like that they did not have any notice of seattle not getting a team. the place looks nice in photos and at the time of 1969 the stadium was around 30 years old. i am sure that sicks stadium could have been fixed up reel nice,look at seals stadium in san francisco i have heard alot of good things about the stadium.sicks stadium was finally torn down in febuary of 1979.
    LONG LIVE THE POLO GROUNDS 1891-1964
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/POLOGROUNDS1962

  6. #6
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    My father had wonderful memories of Sicks and the Rainiers. In the 40's and 50's it was a beautiful minor league park. Seattle wanted major league ball but was in fact behind the 8 ball in their preparation for it. In 69 the stadium was a mess and the franchise was probably failing before they set foot on spring training ground in Arizona.
    After the '69 the stadium started to flounder into obscurity. I think they played some class A games in their and then I think they had some high school games in their also. Then it sat there abandoned like a ghost for a few years it seems before it was torn down. My great grandmother lived in the neighborhood and so I passed it many times on my way to visit her. It still had the Pilots neon sign hanging over its entrance until the day of its death. I always wanted to sneak into the old place but I never did. I wish I had. The last I heard there was an Eagle Hardware store on the lot and that somewhere inside the store was a plaque commemorating where homeplate had once been and that where tightwad hill had been was now just parking lot.

  7. #7
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    Sicks on the decline

    Quote Originally Posted by Ressurection of Ray Oyler
    My father had wonderful memories of Sicks and the Rainiers. In the 40's and 50's it was a beautiful minor league park. Seattle wanted major league ball but was in fact behind the 8 ball in their preparation for it. In 69 the stadium was a mess and the franchise was probably failing before they set foot on spring training ground in Arizona.
    After the '69 the stadium started to flounder into obscurity. I think they played some class A games in their and then I think they had some high school games in their also. Then it sat there abandoned like a ghost for a few years it seems before it was torn down. My great grandmother lived in the neighborhood and so I passed it many times on my way to visit her. It still had the Pilots neon sign hanging over its entrance until the day of its death. I always wanted to sneak into the old place but I never did. I wish I had. The last I heard there was an Eagle Hardware store on the lot and that somewhere inside the store was a plaque commemorating where homeplate had once been and that where tightwad hill had been was now just parking lot.

    What a shame, to see a once grand park fade away and die...The photos
    that Polo placed on this thread, are wonderful..in her heyday, SICKS ,musta
    been a great place to take in a ballgame..The inside looked pretty grand..as
    that whole northwest area, had some great PCL teams in the 40's and 50's..

    by the time MLB expanded into Seattle, by 1968, for play in 1969, the park
    had fallen into a sad shape..and from what i can remember from my couple
    of games there in 1969, to see the Tigers, it was a virtual dump..and probably
    not much upkeep was given to SICKS, before-and during the PILOTS debut
    season..I've heard stories of teams, showering and dressing at the local
    hotel, as the clubhouses were a mess..along with rusty water, very low
    water pressure and other problems...I always had the feeling that the guys
    who owned the SEATTLE franchise, had no real money, and were vastly
    under funded..and hence, the shoddy condition of the park, and no money
    for the team...no surprise that after one season, the Pilots were killed, and
    the team quickly moved-during spring training..to become the BREWERS.

    sad that Sicks never had the chance,to shine as the once jewel that it was.

  8. #8
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    I always have wondered if the Sorianos plan was to just buy the team and try and hold it for a year and then try to sell to someone who would keep the team here. They apparently had no idea what a mess the whole thing was and that they must have thought baseball would boom right out of the gate in Seattle. The Rainiers had been so popular that they must have thought that the Pilots would automatically succeed.

    The stadium at the time of 1969 was in a state of disrepair sure, but that couldn't be the reason the franchise failed so miserably. I think Sicks is more a metaphor of the dissasembled mess that the organization was. Being just a young kid it was a heartbreaker for myself to see them go. Long live the Pilots (in my memories atleast)!

    Thank you Polo Grounds for those pictures. I have seen pictures of Sicks in the 40's and 50's and it looks like it was just a beautiful park for the times. It's dissapointing to me the lack of sentimentality that the city of Seattle has towards Sicks Stadium. No, it wasn't the Polo grounds or Ebbetts for that matter but I seem to remember they couldn't wait to tear it down. That's life. But to me it will always be that green field in my mind.

  9. #9

    Sick's Stadium Demolition

    sick's stadium demolition.bmp

    Couldn't the city of Seattle upgrade or renovate Sick's Stadium instead of demolishing it?
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Tailwind Tommy; 07-31-2011 at 06:06 PM. Reason: pics added

  10. #10

    Pilots Home Opener

    Pilots.jpg

    Wouldn't we have rather continued to enjoy scenes like this? As Jimmy Dudley, voice of the Pilots, use to say: "Something beautiful to see"

  11. #11
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    Dig that name Tailwind Tommy! I thought I was the only person left who remembered that. Good to know there are others out there.

    The city of Seattle would love for people to forget that the Pilots ever existed (when I say city of Seatte I mean city government). For the last 35 years there has never been any acknowledgement of the Pilots. They've continually turned their backs at honoring the team. Would anyone love to see a Seattle Pilots old-timers game at Safeco? I would! It will never happen though. How 'bout a turn back the clock game? Doubt it will ever happen. They honored the Seattle Steelheads an old northwest negroe league team (great honor I must add) but never have they mentioned honoring the Pilots.

    Poor Sicks Stadium its' only mistake was that it housed the 1969 Seattle Pilots. That's why they were in such a hurry to tear it down.

  12. #12
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    demise of sicks

    Quote Originally Posted by Tailwind Tommy
    sick's stadium demolition.bmp

    Couldn't the city of Seattle upgrade or renovate Sick's Stadium instead of demolishing it?
    looks like it was a clear case of being penny wise and pound foolish..

    the city of Seattle, had no interest in saving this oce grand lady..
    some great baseball over the years, was played there...and with
    the demise of the Pilots, before the start of spring training 1970,
    was the nail in the coffin, that doomed sicks..a sad commentary

  13. #13

    Memories of Ray Oyler

    jdoyle3.jpg

    Hey Resurrection... Here's one for your Pilots' book! A J.D. McCarthy photo taken at Tiger Stadium. Ray Oyler - Died in 1981. PILOTS BESTS: Most double plays by a shortstop (4), most double plays started by a shortstop
    (3); most putouts by a shortstop (5); most assists by a shortstop (8).
    "Sock It To Me"

  14. #14
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    Yes, yes. Dick Mcauliffe (doubt I spelled it right) said he was the best defensive shortstop he ever played with. He had to be considering he had one of the most anemic bats ever seen in the majors. I remember well when he died and cut his obit out of the paper and probably still have it somewhere. You're a good man Tailwind!! Thanks!

  15. #15
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    they had some real misfits on that team, like Jim Bouton,
    Gary Bell, Ray Oyler,
    They werent really misfits just ahead of their times. But lets not forget Steve Hovley. And yes the stadium is a parking lot and theres a statue where homeplate used to be and and a plaque that says something like, If you were standing here in 1969 you would be in perfect position to knock one out. Jim bouton said he visited it and the statue had the batter standing sideways in the box and it would be easy from that position to hit one out because it would be 100 feet foul. Theres also a faking pitching rubber for where the mound was, unfortunately its right next to a cash register
    Born True Blue

  16. #16
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    oil can oyler

    Quote Originally Posted by Ressurection of Ray Oyler
    Yes, yes. Dick Mcauliffe (doubt I spelled it right) said he was the best defensive shortstop he ever played with. He had to be considering he had one of the most anemic bats ever seen in the majors. I remember well when he died and cut his obit out of the paper and probably still have it somewhere. You're a good man Tailwind!! Thanks!

    remember his nickname..'oil can' as he always looked like his was doing
    grungy oil changes..no doubt, a wizard with the glove..with the bat,
    mister zero..even to reach .200, was an major effort..I think one season
    he batted under .150...god, was he horrible..with the stick..only Eddie
    Brinkman, even came close to being so crappy with the lumber, and
    even Brinkman, learn to hit..batting over .260 plus..a few times in
    his career..and like Oyler, Brinkman could filed and eat up ground balls
    like nobody's biz.....

    Oyler after leaving Detroit, was a cult fave in Seattle...after he retired,
    I believe he like Seattle soo much, ended up living there and working inna
    warehouse..until he died in the early 1980's...

  17. #17
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    Thanks for that interesting bit of info El Camino. Bouton may be the most sentimental person about the Pilots out there.

    Oil Can. Such a fitting name for a guy who looked like he'd be right at home working at Grease Monkey rather than playing major league ball. He worked at Boeing for awhile I believe.

    They had a lot of characters on the team. Let's not forget the ever affable Freddy Talbot, king of the rednecks. I wonder if he's ever forgiven Bouton for making such a buffoon out of him in Ball Four?

  18. #18
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    I heard when fred talbot is contacted and asked about ball four he says how Bouton broke the rules of the club house and angrily refuses any further comment
    Born True Blue

  19. #19
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    Rest of the Pilots

    Quote Originally Posted by Ressurection of Ray Oyler
    Thanks for that interesting bit of info El Camino. Bouton may be the most sentimental person about the Pilots out there.

    Oil Can. Such a fitting name for a guy who looked like he'd be right at home working at Grease Monkey rather than playing major league ball. He worked at Boeing for awhile I believe.

    They had a lot of characters on the team. Let's not forget the ever affable Freddy Talbot, king of the rednecks. I wonder if he's ever forgiven Bouton for making such a buffoon out of him in Ball Four?
    and don't forget Don Mincher, and the team's resident hipster and hippie,
    Steve Holvey ..aka tennis ball..a great flake..and ended up doing a tour
    with the brewers..as they were mutanting from the pilots..

    good to see there's still great interest in the Pilots threads..over 155 posts!
    and some darn gooooooood ones,at that ! and in the words of Joe Schutz
    the first mgr...'pound that Budweiser'

  20. #20
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    I think someone (me) mentioned Hovley in post 15
    Born True Blue

  21. #21
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    The last I heard about Hovely he was a carpenter in California and I think he said he's still in touch with Bouton. Mincher's a big man in Huntsville, Alabama where he had a real successful sporting goods store and was also the interim president of the Southern Association. I think that they named a street after him too. Mincher was always one of my favorite players when I was a kid.
    Joe Schultz was the king of bad grammar and probably not the best manager the game has ever seen but dammit the Pilots were his destiny. His key to immortality. I think Joe's life centered around baseball, budweiser beer and two words, shi*f*ck and f*cksh*t (in no particular order I think). He was a good man though.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ressurection of Ray Oyler
    Mincher's a big man in Huntsville, Alabama where he had a real successful sporting goods store and was also the interim president of the Southern Association. I think that they named a street after him too. Mincher was always one of my favorite players when I was a kid.
    Don Mincher was one of my favorites as well, having played for both the original and expansion Senators.

    Actually, Don Mincher has been the president of the Southern League for 5 years now. Check this link:

    http://www.southernleague.com/league.../mincher.shtml

    Don looks a little different than I remember from his playing days.
    "For the Washington Senators, the worst time of the year is the baseball season." Roger Kahn

    "People ask me what I do in winter when there's no baseball. I'll tell you what I do. I stare out the window and wait for spring." Rogers Hornsby.

  23. #23
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    Hovley was a janitor at his daughters school for a while, then became a plumber, as of the 1990's. Hes a real smart guy, Im pretty sure he went to stanford or something.
    Born True Blue

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by ElCaminoSS
    I heard when fred talbot is contacted and asked about ball four he says how Bouton broke the rules of the club house and angrily refuses any further comment
    Ball Four was and is such a great baseball book. The Talbot stories are some of the funniest in the book. One thing that Bouton forgot to do though was incriminate himself with a lot of the locker room and extra curricular activities. He broke the rules but nobody was really hurt that badly. I suppose if anyone has a right to not forgive Bouton it was Talbot but wow its been 36 years now. By todays standards the book is pretty tame. It was great locker room humor.

  25. #25

    Sicks Stadium postcard

    Here is a postcard of sicks stadium put out by tinker
    Attached Images Attached Images
    LONG LIVE THE POLO GROUNDS 1891-1964
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/POLOGROUNDS1962

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