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Thread: Down on the Farm

  1. #76
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    What were his numbers in AA?

    And what's his position currently? Last I knew he played 3B, OF too.
    I could have also sworn he was a catcher.
    "After my fourth season I asked for $43,000 and General Manager Ed Barrow told me, 'Young man, do you realize Lou Gehrig, a 16-year-man, is playing for only $44,000?' I said, Mr. Barrow, there is only one answer to that - Mr. Gehrig is terribly underpaid."- Yankees outfielder Joe DiMaggio

  2. Quote Originally Posted by TonyStarks
    What were his numbers in AA?

    And what's his position currently? Last I knew he played 3B, OF too.
    I could have also sworn he was a catcher.
    No idea. I only keep tabs on AAA pitchers with a few exceptions.

  3. #78
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    Last Game: 5.0 3 0 0 1 9 2.57 - W (6-3)

    5 Innings, 3 Hits, 1 BB, 9 K's.
    Yanks have limited Hughes to only 5Innings per game, Max.

    __

    Duncan, Eric 1B ............ 4 1 3 2 .276 - HR (6)
    3 for 4.

    AVG seems to be going up.
    Seems like the demotion did him some good.
    "After my fourth season I asked for $43,000 and General Manager Ed Barrow told me, 'Young man, do you realize Lou Gehrig, a 16-year-man, is playing for only $44,000?' I said, Mr. Barrow, there is only one answer to that - Mr. Gehrig is terribly underpaid."- Yankees outfielder Joe DiMaggio

  4. #79
    Cashman, call up Jorge DePaula and give him a shot at the rotation!!!

  5. #80
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    Got numbers for him??
    "After my fourth season I asked for $43,000 and General Manager Ed Barrow told me, 'Young man, do you realize Lou Gehrig, a 16-year-man, is playing for only $44,000?' I said, Mr. Barrow, there is only one answer to that - Mr. Gehrig is terribly underpaid."- Yankees outfielder Joe DiMaggio

  6. #81
    Quote Originally Posted by TonyStarks
    Got numbers for him??
    3-5, 2.70 ERA, 70 IP, 11 GS, 12 G, 35 K, 12 BB, 3 HR, .257 BAA.

    The strikeout totals are uninspiring, but everything else looks pretty decent.

  7. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by DoubleX
    3-5, 2.70 ERA, 70 IP, 11 GS, 12 G, 35 K, 12 BB, 3 HR, .257 BAA.

    The strikeout totals are uninspiring, but everything else looks pretty decent.

    Not to bad.
    I'm all for giving him an honest shot over Chacon at this point.
    "After my fourth season I asked for $43,000 and General Manager Ed Barrow told me, 'Young man, do you realize Lou Gehrig, a 16-year-man, is playing for only $44,000?' I said, Mr. Barrow, there is only one answer to that - Mr. Gehrig is terribly underpaid."- Yankees outfielder Joe DiMaggio

  8. #83
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    20 questions with Yankee outfield prospect Jose Tabata:

    http://www.minorleaguebaseball.com/a...milb&fext=.jsp

    Jose Tabata is an 18-year-old outfield prospect in the Yankees organization. Signed by the Bronx Bombers in 2005 out of Venezuela, Tabata was ranked by Baseball America as the third-best prospect in the Yanks' farm system, behind only Phil Hughes and Eric Duncan. Last year, Tabata played for the Gulf Coast Yankees, hitting .314 with 22 steals in 44 games. This season, he is playing for the Charleston RiverDogs of the South Atlantic League, where he is hitting .303 with 95 hits and 15 steals in 84 games.

    MiLB.com: You grew up in Venezuela. How old were you when you started playing baseball?

    Jose Tabata: I was 5. We had leagues there just like Little League, so I started as soon as I was old enough.

    MiLB.com: So at what point did you decide professional baseball was something you'd like to pursue?

    JT: When I was about 15. I played in the league then and decided I wanted to look into the pros. The first time I came here was for baseball, so it was nice to come to a new place.

    MiLB.com: How were you "discovered" by the Yankees, the team you signed with?

    JT: I was seen by a scout who was down in Venezuela. He talked with me and my family and things went from there. The day I signed my contract my parents were the happiest people in the world.

    MiLB.com: You were 17 when you signed and came to America for the first time. Did you heave any fears or doubts about coming to a new country by yourself?

    JT: No, there were no nerves. My parents and I were just happy I was going to do what I wanted to do.

    MiLB.com: What was one of the first things you did when you got here?

    JT: I went to my hotel and hung out until it was time to meet my new teammates.

    MiLB.com: How was the reception you received from your new teammates?

    JT: It was nice. I couldn't speak any English back then, even now it's very limited, but they were all really nice and friendly.

    MiLB.com: What was your friends' and family's reaction when you came home after your first season in the Minors?

    JT: I'm one of the youngest people to travel out of Venezuela for something like this so there were a lot of surprise parties (laughs).

    MiLB.com: Was the transition from Venezuelan life to American life difficult?

    JT: Everyone said it would be hard to get used to but it wasn't, thank God. I just focused on baseball because that's what I was here for and that made it easier.

    MiLB.com: Were you exposed to Major League Baseball while growing up in Venezuela?

    JT: There were games on TV. I grew up loving Manny Ramirez.

    MiLB.com: Your childhood hero was Manny and now you're a part of the Yankees, how does that feel?

    JT: (Laughs) It's weird because I love Manny Ramirez, but I knew that if I played it would only be for the New York Yankees. I wouldn't even consider it.

    MiLB.com: What advice are you giving to young guys -- here or in Venezuela -- trying to break into pro baseball?

    JT: Keep the big picture in mind. Stay focused on your goals and always keep the big picture in your mind.

    MiLB.com: What are you doing when you aren't playing baseball?

    JT: I love playing basketball as much as baseball. If I was taller maybe I'd be in the NBA right now (laughs).

    MiLB.com: What were some differences you noticed between American baseball and Venezuelan baseball?

    JT: Over there I knew the players and was more comfortable with them. Here it's not as predictable, so it's harder to figure some things out, but the game itself is the same.

    MiLB.com: What's the best part about playing here?

    JT: The most important thing to me is being a team player. I'm not caught up with doing well all by myself; I have that team-mentality.

    MiLB.com: Do you shy away from being in the public eye, or do you enjoy it?

    JT: Oddly enough, although my English isn't that good, I like speaking in public. I enjoy being around fans or young children and getting to know people.

    MiLB.com: What do you miss the most about home?

    JT: My family. Being away from them is the toughest thing. They've never been here to visit me, but maybe someday when I'm in the big leagues. My mom's cooking, too.

    MiLB.com: What's your favorite Minor League ballpark to play in?

    JT: It's hard to pick a favorite when I've never seen anything like any of these nice parks in Venezuela. They're all so nice, nothing like at home.

    MiLB.com: What big-league ballpark would you play in if you had the choice?

    JT: Yankee Stadium, as a Yankee.

    MiLB.com: So you mentioned you missed your mom's cooking, has there been any one American dish that's served a substitute?

    JT: I love fast food. All of it, I don't have one place I always go to, but just all the fast-food places are great.

    MiLB.com: Do you find yourself taking things you've learned playing here back home with you?

    JT: I'm learning a lot of new tendencies here, but I usually go with what I grew up with. I don't think that'll ever change.

  9. #84
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    Updates

    I'm just posting some Updates on the Gems of the Farm:

    Jose Tabata: 18YO - OF - R/R

    05: 44 Games .314 AVG / 3 HR / 25 RBI 22:28 Steals
    (All-Star) .382 OBP: .417 SLG : .799 OPS


    06: 84 Games .303 / 5 HR / 51 RBI / 15:20 Steals
    (Futures All Star) .383 OBP / .427 SLG / .809 OPS


    _______________


    Phillip Hughes: 20 - SP - R/R
    06:
    High A: 2-3 / 1.80 ERA / 30Inn / 30Ks / 2BB / 19 Hits Allowed / 6 ER
    AA : 6-3 / 2.85 ERA / 82 Inn / 90K / 25 BB / 61 Hits / 26 ER
    (Futures All Star)


    _____

    Eric Duncan: 22 - 1B/3B - L/R
    06: AA: 43G .286 AVG / 10 HR / 26 RBI / 23BB/ 19K/ .383 OBP / .584 SLG / .968 OPS
    Last edited by TonyStarks; 07-31-2006 at 01:29 PM.
    "After my fourth season I asked for $43,000 and General Manager Ed Barrow told me, 'Young man, do you realize Lou Gehrig, a 16-year-man, is playing for only $44,000?' I said, Mr. Barrow, there is only one answer to that - Mr. Gehrig is terribly underpaid."- Yankees outfielder Joe DiMaggio

  10. #85
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    One of the premiere pitching matchups across the minors took place at Double-A Reading on Wednesday, as Phillies lefthander Gio Gonzalez went up against Yankees righthander Philip Hughes.

    Gonzalez wound up on the winning side, as the Phillies downed Trenton 5-1, but Hughes was solid, allowing just two hits over five shutout innings and striking out eight.

    "You can see why the Yankees didn't want to part with him in any kind of trade," Reading pitching coach Tom Filer said. "I saw him when he first got here (to Double-A) and he was just OK. But he was on a different level last night."

    Hughes, the Yankees' first-rounder in 2004, hasn't lost since June 8--and has racked up 71 strikeouts in 51 innings since that outing. Since being promoted to the Eastern League, Hughes is now 6-3, 2.67 with a 106-28 strikeout ratio over 91 innings.

    "He's on a hot streak right now and you could see it," Filer said. "He's got that easy, repeatable delivery and the ball just jumps out of his hand. He was 94 (mph) without even trying and sat at 93-94 all night. He was never in any kind of trouble."
    "After my fourth season I asked for $43,000 and General Manager Ed Barrow told me, 'Young man, do you realize Lou Gehrig, a 16-year-man, is playing for only $44,000?' I said, Mr. Barrow, there is only one answer to that - Mr. Gehrig is terribly underpaid."- Yankees outfielder Joe DiMaggio

  11. #86
    I think Hughes has done enough to merit a September callup and some serious consideration for next season.

  12. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by DoubleX
    I think Hughes has done enough to merit a September callup and some serious consideration for next season.

    Are you crazy? We just got Lidle and Ponson!!!!
    "After my fourth season I asked for $43,000 and General Manager Ed Barrow told me, 'Young man, do you realize Lou Gehrig, a 16-year-man, is playing for only $44,000?' I said, Mr. Barrow, there is only one answer to that - Mr. Gehrig is terribly underpaid."- Yankees outfielder Joe DiMaggio

  13. #88
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    Tabata done for the year

    Tough news for the 17 year old prospect.
    Earlier in the season (April/May) he was hit on the thumb with a pitched ball and missed some time on the DL. In July at the Futures Game, he was hit on the same thumb in BP (i heard this secondhand but im pretty sure thats the story). He did not go on the DL though, and his line at the time was .321/.395/.454.

    After coming back from the Futures game, he went 1-20 with 8 Ks, went back on the DL, came back on Friday, and reinjured the same thumb (now 1-26 with 10 Ks since the futures game). He's being shut down for the year and his final season numbers are .298/.377/.420. I dont think he had anything else to prove in low A ball, and would have been due for a promotion to Tampa if he hadnt gotten hit again (he was hitting almost .400 in his previous 15 games), but i'd rather they be safe with him and not push it.
    Quote Originally Posted by DoubleX
    I think Hughes has done enough to merit a September callup and some serious consideration for next season.
    http://www.minorleaguebaseball.com/a...=t_ros&cid=567

    He's only in AA right now. You call him up now, he'd likely get burned up quickly. I'd hate seeing him against Boston.

    Heck, when Schilling came off the DL, they didn't put him up against the Yanks. First it was Pawtucket, then some scrub teams.

    I think he should be here around June.
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  14. #89
    Quote Originally Posted by Mattingly
    He's only in AA right now. You call him up now, he'd likely get burned up quickly. I'd hate seeing him against Boston.

    Heck, when Schilling came off the DL, they didn't put him up against the Yanks. First it was Pawtucket, then some scrub teams.

    I think he should be here around June.
    It's not uncommon for players to leap from AA to the Majors, especially just for a September cameo. The team can expand to 40 players, so if it has a stud prospect like Phillips, might as well see how ready he is against ML competition so the team knows for next year and so he can get some experience. Last year, Melky came up from AA.

  15. Quote Originally Posted by DoubleX
    It's not uncommon for players to leap from AA to the Majors, especially just for a September cameo. The team can expand to 40 players, so if it has a stud prospect like Phillips, might as well see how ready he is against ML competition so the team knows for next year and so he can get some experience. Last year, Melky came up from AA.
    Great points, all of them.

  16. #91
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    I wonder if they will pull a Melky with Philip Hughes. You know, call him up to MLB, watch him stink, but demote him only to AAA and then call him back up next year and watch him own face

  17. Quote Originally Posted by mikesty
    I wonder if they will pull a Melky with Philip Hughes. You know, call him up to MLB, watch him stink, but demote him only to AAA and then call him back up next year and watch him own face
    I wouldn`t mind that

  18. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rickey_Henderson
    I wouldn`t mind that
    Nah.
    I wouldn't want to do anything to mess with Hughes confidence.

    If he gets a Sept call up...I'd limit him to 2-3 batters per inning.
    So that not too much damage could be done.
    "After my fourth season I asked for $43,000 and General Manager Ed Barrow told me, 'Young man, do you realize Lou Gehrig, a 16-year-man, is playing for only $44,000?' I said, Mr. Barrow, there is only one answer to that - Mr. Gehrig is terribly underpaid."- Yankees outfielder Joe DiMaggio

  19. #94
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    Damage?

    Jeez, why coddle him so much? Are we trying to make him into the next Roger Clemens or the next Carl Pavano?

    If he still does well they'll probably promote him to AAA, but no doubt he'll get a September 40-man call up. He'll pitch an inning or two of relief every so often. Regardless of getting rocked or not, he should go down to AAA.

    I don't think it's as much "damaging" him as it is "humbling" him, if he gets rocked, that is.

  20. Quote Originally Posted by mikesty
    Damage?

    Jeez, why coddle him so much? Are we trying to make him into the next Roger Clemens or the next Carl Pavano?

    If he still does well they'll probably promote him to AAA, but no doubt he'll get a September 40-man call up. He'll pitch an inning or two of relief every so often. Regardless of getting rocked or not, he should go down to AAA.

    I don't think it's as much "damaging" him as it is "humbling" him, if he gets rocked, that is.
    I agree. We might as well see what we got.

  21. #96
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikesty
    Damage?

    Jeez, why coddle him so much? Are we trying to make him into the next Roger Clemens or the next Carl Pavano?

    If he still does well they'll probably promote him to AAA, but no doubt he'll get a September 40-man call up. He'll pitch an inning or two of relief every so often. Regardless of getting rocked or not, he should go down to AAA.

    I don't think it's as much "damaging" him as it is "humbling" him, if he gets rocked, that is.
    You baby sit the kid because you don't want him to be the next Rick Ankiel.
    Once a pitcher loses his confidence he might as well pack his bags and get the hell out of dodge. Especially in the Bronx!
    "After my fourth season I asked for $43,000 and General Manager Ed Barrow told me, 'Young man, do you realize Lou Gehrig, a 16-year-man, is playing for only $44,000?' I said, Mr. Barrow, there is only one answer to that - Mr. Gehrig is terribly underpaid."- Yankees outfielder Joe DiMaggio

  22. #97
    Yankeebiscuitfan Guest
    Here is a nice article about Hughes. I found it on Yankees.com.

    After striking out eight batters in just four innings on a recent summer night, the Yankees' most talented, most hyped and above all, most mature prospect since a pitcher named Andy Pettitte, emerged from the clubhouse for interviews.
    He wore an oversized, floppy Trenton Thunder hat held on by a rubber band strapped under his chin.

    Meet Philip Hughes, the power pitching prospect who had the Yankees uncharacteristically thinking about more than this season's playoffs when making deals at this year's trade deadline.

    He may seem like a veteran, but Hughes unintentionally reminded reporters that he did just turn 20 a little more than a month ago. Judging by the buzz surrounding him, or the way he has pitched, one couldn't otherwise tell he's only in Double-A.

    It appears that's where Hughes will be for the rest of the season. One thing is now known, Hughes won't in Philadelphia, Washington, D.C., or Milwaukee, despite swirling rumors that had him involved in several trade talks.

    The understanding was that the Yankees could have had anybody on the trade market if Hughes was involved in the deal. Yankees general manager Brian Cashman passed until Hughes was out of it.

    Hughes was too good to give up, and Cashman was willing to hold out to protect him.

    "The Phillies got prospects in this deal, but there were certain guys that, at this point in time, I was unwilling to give up," Cashman said after acquiring Bobby Abreu on July 30.

    Hughes' Double-A manager, Bill Masse, could then exhale. Even with Hughes all but off the market leading up to the deadline, Masse was still playing the role of a somewhat nervous general manager, although he tried not to show it.

    "I wouldn't trade him for anyone in baseball," Masse said. "It would have to be something completely out of this world to trade him."

    There has been some talk that the California resident wouldn't mind being part of the Red Sox, his favorite team as a child. Hughes' father grew up in Rhode Island and Hughes would go to games at Fenway Park during the summer.

    "People always think I'm secretly rooting for the Red Sox or something," Hughes said with a laugh. "But that's not the case."

    If Hughes has his way, he'll be with the Yankees for his entire career. But leading up to the deadline, the first-round draft choice in the 2004 First-Year Player Draft understood that baseball is a business. So he just went out and pitched.

    More than his pinpoint low-90s fastball or up-and-coming curveball, it's that calm demeanor that has most impressed his coaches.

    "This is a special, special kid," Masse said as if he were saying it for the first time, when in actuality he has repeated it over and over. "If any kid was made to pitch on the big stage it's this kid, just because of his makeup."

    Hughes is 6-3 with a 2.67 ERA, and has 106 strikeouts in 91 innings this season at Trenton. Even with the scouts taking aim with their radar guns at Waterfront Park recently, Hughes still put on a show. He allowed one run in four innings while striking out eight and walking just one -- and he couldn't have looked more comfortable doing it.

    "It's tough sometimes because there's always a little bit extra pressure on you to do well. But I kind of like it," Hughes said. "I can thrive off that pressure a little bit. If you can't handle the pressure and the high expectations in the Minor Leagues you're not going to do well in Yankee Stadium."

    Cashman long ago ruled out the possibility that Hughes would take the Yankee Stadium mound this season. Trenton pitching coach Dave Eiland said Hughes is close to being ready, but he wouldn't recommend a promotion yet.

    "Although if he had to, with his sheer ability, he probably could [throw the Majors this year]," Eiland added.

    For now, the Yankees are sheltering Hughes' place in the organization and his precious arm. Hughes doesn't pitch more than five innings and usually tosses between 70 and 90 pitches.

    Hughes is focusing on improving the command of his curveball and changeup, which Eiland feels is the only thing needed before Hughes is big-league ready. The power pitcher first learned the changeup in Spring Training, when he abandoned his slider.

    "I feel like I'm a completely different pitcher than I was in high school," Hughes said.

    Masse said he's seen vast improvements even since Hughes has been in Trenton. Still, even back in April during Spring Training, Yankees catcher Jorge Posada said Hughes had the best arm on the staff.

    It was then that Jason Giambi compared Hughes to Roger Clemens, something Eiland said he could also see.

    Hughes is most-often mentioned in the same sentence as Pettitte, the last Yankees player who had as much hype and composure as Hughes. But Pettitte was older by the time he dominated Double-A, and Masse said Pettitte pitched his way into more attention. Hughes has had it almost from the get-go.

    While most coaches hate to make comparisons between players, or projections for how big a star prospects will be, Hughes' Trenton coaches don't seem to mind. They are that confident.

    "There's going to be those comparisons, there's no way around it," Eiland said. "Any power-type guy, he's going to be compared to. But he doesn't try to be like anybody else. He just tries to be Phil Hughes."

    Although he said it got repetitive, Hughes liked hearing his name on ESPN last month. He didn't shy away from comparisons and he heard all the rumors. He just didn't let it give him a big head -- figuratively.

    Hughes literally does have a large head, inches wise. Before the game he was using a special device to stretch his hat out.

    The floppy hat he donned afterwards was for comfort. When the cameras were turned off and the radar guns put to rest, Hughes was himself.

    "I'm growing out of my old [hat]," Hughes said with a laugh. "I might need to showcase this guy."

    He may pitch like Clemens, but Hughes is still a kid. One the Yankees aren't willing to let grow up outside of their home.

  23. #98
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    Tyler Clippard, rhp, Yankees (Double-A Trenton): After his rough start, Clippard has pitched consistently well for Double-A Trenton, forming an excellent 1-2 punch with Philip Hughes. He's won six straight decisions and has 27 strikeouts in just 19 innings over his last three starts, giving him 146 in 140 innings overall.
    "After my fourth season I asked for $43,000 and General Manager Ed Barrow told me, 'Young man, do you realize Lou Gehrig, a 16-year-man, is playing for only $44,000?' I said, Mr. Barrow, there is only one answer to that - Mr. Gehrig is terribly underpaid."- Yankees outfielder Joe DiMaggio

  24. #99
    Quote Originally Posted by TonyStarks
    Tyler Clippard, rhp, Yankees (Double-A Trenton): After his rough start, Clippard has pitched consistently well for Double-A Trenton, forming an excellent 1-2 punch with Philip Hughes. He's won six straight decisions and has 27 strikeouts in just 19 innings over his last three starts, giving him 146 in 140 innings overall.
    How old is Clippard (I'm too lazy to go look it up myself right now )?

  25. #100
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    He'll be 22 in february.

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