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Thread: OUR Ebbets Field History!

  1. #201
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    Great shots of OUR Ebbets Field, PG1957.

    Thanks for posting them.

    One note, iwas before my time, but I don't ever remember seeing OUR lower centerfield bleacher seats blocked off the way they are in these photos on Opening Day, April 16, 1942.

    Can anyone shed some light on this question?

    c.

  2. #202
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    Here are the bleachers in the 1952 World Series.
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  3. #203
    Sweet Picture Paulmcall! I actually drove by the Ebbets Field Appartments last Friday. I came up Bedford Ave Which is where the right field wall once stood. The neighborhood is in complete shambles. Driving up Bedford Ave. you can see the old townhouses and brown stone buildings left from the time when that area was a beautiful pace to live. Unfortunatley I didn't have a camera with me.
    On the corner of Bedford and Sullivan there is a service station with an art-deco style canopy. Does anyone know/remember if that was there when Ebbets was there?

  4. #204
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    Quote Originally Posted by R Ryan823 View Post
    Sweet Picture Paulmcall! I actually drove by the Ebbets Field Appartments last Friday. I came up Bedford Ave Which is where the right field wall once stood. The neighborhood is in complete shambles. Driving up Bedford Ave. you can see the old townhouses and brown stone buildings left from the time when that area was a beautiful pace to live. Unfortunatley I didn't have a camera with me.
    On the corner of Bedford and Sullivan there is a service station with an art-deco style canopy. Does anyone know/remember if that was there when Ebbets was there?
    R Ryan, you are a brave man to go there.

    I've done it 5 times, and never will go again - although I still want to visit the McDonald's across the street since it has or had photos of EF, and I want to photo the EF mural that is on a building on Flatbush Avenue, but will resist those urges for now.

    My reactions were identical to yours. The upward slope on Bedford Avenue outside the right field wall brought back instant fond memories of a half century and more ago. As did the gas station. It was an Esso station then, I think, but it has changed in structure. The present station may even be a few feet away from the original one. The old one also parked cars, I think.

    Much of the surrounding housing stock on the streets perpendicular to Bedford Avenue seems solid on the outside and facially attractive.

    BUT, as we know from the many postings on the board, this is NOT the EF neighborhood we all knew in the Dodger era.

    Still, gentrification is going on in many parts of Brooklyn. So, maybe there is future hope for our baseball holy ground.

  5. #205
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    Quote Originally Posted by DODGER DEB View Post
    At the excellent suggestion of Former, zman, I am adding a thread on OUR Ebbets Field History, which I will sticky.

    Please feel free to add photos of OUR Ebbets Field to the collection, dating back to Opening Day in 1913.

    Please remember to add the source of your photos, or articles.




    From an eBay listing.

    c.
    Don't shoot me.. I'm an old Yankee fan.

    I confess, though, that I might be an old Brooklyn Dodger fan now, though. The teams you had from '49 thru '56 were loaded with great players, and what a great ballpark you had!

    I remember the Happy Felton show before the games... great for the kids.

    I guess my favorite Dodger would have been Gil Hodges.. a real gentleman.

    It's terrible, in my opinion, that the Dodgers and Giants left NY. That was the beginning of the end of real baseball.

    It was a great time to be a kid growing up.... I loved it, and miss it.

  6. #206
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bruno2 View Post
    Don't shoot me.. I'm an old Yankee fan.

    I confess, though, that I might be an old Brooklyn Dodger fan now, though. The teams you had from '49 thru '56 were loaded with great players, and what a great ballpark you had!

    I remember the Happy Felton show before the games... great for the kids.

    I guess my favorite Dodger would have been Gil Hodges.. a real gentleman.

    It's terrible, in my opinion, that the Dodgers and Giants left NY. That was the beginning of the end of real baseball.

    It was a great time to be a kid growing up.... I loved it, and miss it.

    No, Bruno2, WE don't shoot old pinstriper fans (though that may have been a temptation long ago). WE are just glad that you have seen "the error of your ways". I agree....WE loved it, and miss it, too!

    Welcome to OUR corner (the best) of BBF. I always enjoy seeing new members come visit OUR forum and join in the discussion.

    Have fun here; WE always do!

    c.

  7. #207
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    There is something else that is a shame: neither MLB nor NYC is doing anything to commemorate the horrid loss of the Dodgers and Giantss.

    The recent Cyclones ceremony is welcome, but minimal.

  8. #208
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    I think they just hope everyone will forget ... just like the steroids.
    They don't deal with ugly truths.

  9. #209
    Quote Originally Posted by EbtsFldGuy View Post
    There is something else that is a shame: neither MLB nor NYC is doing anything to commemorate the horrid loss of the Dodgers and Giantss.

    The recent Cyclones ceremony is welcome, but minimal.

    Other than the Cyclones ceremony, the closest thing to a commemoration is the " Glory Days New York Baseball 1947-1957" exhibits and programs at the City of New York Museum.

  10. #210
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paulmcall View Post
    I think they just hope everyone will forget ... just like the steroids.
    They don't deal with ugly truths.
    Sad, really. I don't think enough people realize what it meant to Brooklyn and the Dodger fans to lose the Dodgers.

    My grandma was a Dodgers fan growing up in PA in the '40s and '50s. A long time ago she told me she disowned baseball after they were stolen. For a long time I never really understood why she did it. Why completely let go? But after reading The Last Good Season and this forum, amongst other material, it all makes perfect sense now. Despite being a Yankee fan I have a soft spot for the Brooklyn Dodgers. If they were still playing at Flatbush today I would probably be a fan. Sometimes it really saddens me that I was never afforded that opportunity.

  11. #211
    Quote Originally Posted by Coal Cracker View Post
    Sad, really. I don't think enough people realize what it meant to Brooklyn and the Dodger fans to lose the Dodgers.

    My grandma was a Dodgers fan growing up in PA in the '40s and '50s. A long time ago she told me she disowned baseball after they were stolen. For a long time I never really understood why she did it. Why completely let go? But after reading The Last Good Season and this forum, amongst other material, it all makes perfect sense now. Despite being a Yankee fan I have a soft spot for the Brooklyn Dodgers. If they were still playing at Flatbush today I would probably be a fan. Sometimes it really saddens me that I was never afforded that opportunity.

    Well said, Coal Cracker.

    It took me until I became an adult to understand the loss of the Brooklyn Dodgers meant to people who were fans of the team during the days the real Dodgers fielded a team. Now, I consider myself a Brooklyn Dodgers fan. There are other MLB teams that I want to see do well, especially the Tigers. Yet, my only MLB team passion is the Brooklyn Dodgers.

  12. #212
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    Does any of you feel like I do at this minute:

    i.e. as much fun as it is to see old shots of EF, sometimes it is JUST TOO SAD to see them, and realize that what we had 50 years ago is gone forever!

  13. #213
    Quote Originally Posted by EbtsFldGuy View Post
    Does any of you feel like I do at this minute:

    i.e. as much fun as it is to see old shots of EF, sometimes it is JUST TOO SAD to see them, and realize that what we had 50 years ago is gone forever!

    It's safe to assume that there will never again be in Pro Sports the combo of the Brooklyn Dodgers team, the Dodgers fan base, Ebbets Field and it's atmosphere, the rivalry with the Giants, and the Subway Series' vs. the Yankees. It's not even remotely close.

    IMO, in today's MLB, St. Louis, Boston, and Chicago ( NL ) provide the best baseball has to offer in terms of fans, ballpark atmosphere, and tradition. The intensity of the Yankees- Red Sox rivalry and the Yankees- Mets rivalry is very good in it's own right. Yet w/o question, what so many of you witnessed first hand at Ebbets Field, especially between 1947 and 1956, was the greatest decade in baseball history that one fan base ever experienced. Even though it took until 1955 for the Dodgers finally to become World Champions for the first time in the 20th Century. Part of what makes the Brooklyn Dodgers so special was the fortitude that the team and fan base had during this period.

  14. #214
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    way back when i was just a little boy living on essex street in the east new york section of brooklyn, my dad would have his brothers and my mom's brothers all gathered in our apartment to drink beer, smoke cigars, and discuss the brooklyn dodgers. those uncles of mine all lived on the same block, and two, in the same apt. house (a 4 family)as we did. listening to the men talk, i learned a lot about the dodgers and their national league rivals. the smoke was blue and thick, the beers flowed freely, and my mom always admonished the men re: their language (which by today's standards was tame). in that kitchen i learned things like durocher's penchant for gambling, clothes, and movie stars. i learned that furillo's arm was the best in baseball, and that gil hodges had huge hands. my dad was a college professor, but the rest of the fellas were all blue-collar men. some drove trucks, others tended bar, and one was a sanitation worker. these guys lived and died with the dodgers. i sure wish someone like ken burns was there all those times with his camera crew, filming it all. what a show they put on! the arguements were whether reese or cox was the better fielder, or if campy had as much power as the duke. boy oh boy, those were really great times. when thomson hit the homer off branca in '51 they drank all night. my mother's meatloaf went uneaten, but my uncle charlie made an extra beer run, and brought back a bottle of scotch, too, as my mom told the story many years later. the funniest thing i can remember was when sal maglie became a dodger! oh, how they yelled and screamed about that! (until the barber spun a no-no in '56). regards to all, pete

  15. #215
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    the final game at ebbets field was a night game vs. pittsburgh, which
    the dodgers won, behind danny mcdevitt, 2-0. only 6,702 fans
    attended. why to this day, i can't figure it out, wasn't the place
    packed? were the brooklyn fans so disgusted with o'malley, that they
    thought staying home would send some type of message? i cannot
    remember why i didn't attend myself (probably because i had just
    turned 11 yrs. old, plus, i did NOT believe they would actually
    move). looking back, i now wish an overflow crowd would have been
    there that sad night. maybe a standing room only throng of over
    34,000 would have sent a stinging message to ol' walter. just a
    thought. regards, pete p.s. if i had been a bit older, say 15 or
    older, i would have gone to ebbets on my own! and, i might add, taken
    a few souvenirs!!
    regards, pete

  16. #216
    Quote Originally Posted by penncentralpete View Post
    the final game at ebbets field was a night game vs. pittsburgh, which
    the dodgers won, behind danny mcdevitt, 2-0. only 6,702 fans
    attended. why to this day, i can't figure it out, wasn't the place
    packed? were the brooklyn fans so disgusted with o'malley, that they
    thought staying home would send some type of message? i cannot
    remember why i didn't attend myself (probably because i had just
    turned 11 yrs. old, plus, i did NOT believe they would actually
    move). looking back, i now wish an overflow crowd would have been
    there that sad night. maybe a standing room only throng of over
    34,000 would have sent a stinging message to ol' walter. just a
    thought. regards, pete p.s. if i had been a bit older, say 15 or
    older, i would have gone to ebbets on my own! and, i might add, taken
    a few souvenirs!!
    regards, pete

    Pete, I can see both sides of the coin on whether to have attended what was almost going to certainly be Dodgers final home game.

    Personally, I don't blame anyone from staying away. The facts that Walter O' Malley was even seriously thinking of moving the Dodgers 3000 miles away, in addition to him playing several home games in Jersey City in 1956 and 1957, was more than enough reasons not to give O' Malley another penny.

    On the other side of the coin, attending Dodgers home games in 1957, including the final game, gave people some final memories of the team in action and being at Ebbets Field. These memories are priceless. This is coming from someone who was born in 1962. I only wish I experienced even one game at Ebbets Field.


    The other reason why I probably would have urged everyone to attend Dodgers home games if I was around back then is IMO, it would have increased the chances of Brooklyn getting another MLB team. Even to this day, there are many people who feel O' Malley's move to Los Angeles was justified because of the declining attendance figures at Ebbets Field. Those people clearly don't understand the reality of what the situation was, including the Dodgers being the most profitable MLB team in the combined period from 1952-1956. Yet, negative perceptions can damage a cause. I believe this happened.

  17. #217
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    simply the greatest baseball venue of all time! IMHO. pete
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  18. #218
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    From eBay (content has been edited):

    "This is an EXTREMELY rare GLOSSY Laser print of the ONLY color photo taken of Ebbets field in Brooklyn NY. NOT COLORIZED, but a real glossy copy of a COLOR PHOTO. The Photographer, signed by: Bernard Peselow the photo was taken the day after color photos were introduced and the day before the field was torn down. This was very rare and the original photo made from the negative. The original photo hangs in the Cooperstown Hall of Fame.
    ....
    It is said that this is the only piece of memorabilia that has a dedication sign on it. The photographers wife, Julia . . . was a big Brooklyn Dodgers fan. Please note: Actual picture looks brighter and clearer."


    I won't vouch for the accuracy of his statements, but it's still a great picture.
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  19. #219
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    1956 NL Champs

    Team Photo From eBay:
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    "Someone asked me if I took steroids. I said, 'No. I had a contract with Wheaties.'"
    --Bob Feller

  20. #220

    Ebbits Field-Bernard Peselow

    Quote Originally Posted by 2Chance View Post
    From eBay (content has been edited):

    "This is an EXTREMELY rare GLOSSY Laser print of the ONLY color photo taken of Ebbets field in Brooklyn NY. NOT COLORIZED, but a real glossy copy of a COLOR PHOTO. The Photographer, signed by: Bernard Peselow the photo was taken the day after color photos were introduced and the day before the field was torn down. This was very rare and the original photo made from the negative. The original photo hangs in the Cooperstown Hall of Fame.
    ....
    It is said that this is the only piece of memorabilia that has a dedication sign on it. The photographers wife, Julia . . . was a big Brooklyn Dodgers fan. Please note: Actual picture looks brighter and clearer."


    I won't vouch for the accuracy of his statements, but it's still a great picture.

    FYI,

    I am the holder of the original color slide for this Hall of Fame capture.
    I inherited it before his passing.

    A.R.

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