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Thread: Where are they now?

  1. #201
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    Thanks Macker...we've also been maintaining this list on the "Where are they now?" thread. (I've been considering whether to merge these two.)

  2. #202
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    Chris Haughey

    I hadn't noticed this name in the list before until I saw the way Macker's version is presented, based on years played in the majors rather than year of birth.

    It makes a difference for Haughey because he pitched his only game in the majors on his 18th birthday: October 3, 1943. It was the last day of the season, and he pitched seven innings in relief of John Wyatt vs. Johnny Vander Meer.

    Haughey lives in the Oakland area today, and the Oakland Tribune ran a few articles on him in 2005. I can only see little bits unless I pay for them, but it appears that he was a sandlot player from Bayside, Queens who pitched batting practice for the Dodgers. It looks like he also served in the Army in 1944 and 1945, and when he came back, he pitched as a pro for 1946 to 1950. In 1947, he was 15-7, 2.64 for St. Joseph of the Western Association (Class C) in the Cardinals chain.

    Here's some more info from the fine website Baseball in Wartime:

    http://www.baseballinwartime.com/pla...ghey_chris.htm
    Last edited by VIBaseball; 04-10-2009 at 11:59 AM. Reason: Added link.

  3. #203
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    I see I had missed Joe Tepsic's passing. List is updated again.

  4. #204
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    Your version should also include Johnny Van Cuyk, Macker. That was something I noticed some weeks back.

    I am going to merge the threads to save duplicate effort. I'm going to look to incorporate the years played in Brooklyn, though, which is a nice feature. I'll try to set up one of thos embedded spreadsheets.

  5. #205
    I interviewed Ed regarding his baseball career and he told me the same story. Once he started to make the rounds at AAA, the teams never really gave him a second look even though he being among the leaders of the International League in homeruns for multiple seasons, hitting 26 in 1952, 27 in 1954 and 28 in 1957. He's finishing up a book on his baseball career. It should be pretty interesting.

    Quote Originally Posted by VIBaseball View Post
    I have corrected the living Dodgers list. Ed Stevens is 84 now, not 94. I was wondering about the guy who was apparently the fourth-oldest on our list and came to realize the year of birth was incorrect.

    Ed turned pro at the age of 16 in 1941. He made his big-league debut in 1945 and was the Dodgers' regular first baseman at age 21 in 1946. The next year, he played only five games in Brooklyn as Jackie Robinson played 1B. Here is a very interesting letter that Ed wrote in 1995 about the situation -- it looks like he got a raw deal from Branch Rickey:

    http://www.historyforsale.com/html/p...tart=4&page=77

    The Pirates purchased him in November '47 and he spent the next two seasons in Pittsburgh. His last big-league action came in 1950, but Ed's minor-league career continued through 1961, mainly in Triple-A (he did not play in 1960).

    "Big Ed" then spent 29 years as a scout, as I found in this Houston Chronicle article from 2007 that also discusses the Jackie Robinson deal:

    http://www.accessmylibrary.com/coms2...6-30340412_ITM

    He lives in Houston today.
    Baseball Happenings
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    http://baseballhappenings.blogspot.com

  6. #206
    Does anyone have any contact information for Don Thompson?

    Quote Originally Posted by VIBaseball View Post
    This North Carolinian was born in Swepsonville, which is near Chapel Hill. The Dodgers sold the outfielder to Triple-A Montreal in July 1954. He finished out the season with the Royals and then retired.

    Thompson moved to Asheville in the western part of the state, where Ray Hathaway also lives. According to The History of Professional Baseball in Asheville by Bill Ballew, Don sold real estate there.

    Something I had not known was that he came up as a pitcher.
    Baseball Happenings
    - Linking baseball's past, present and future.
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  7. #207
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    Johnny Rutherford

    Signed in 1947, this righty pitcher from Ontario climbed through the ranks, going 15-8, 2.94 for St. Paul in 1951. The so-called "right-handed Preacher Roe" started 11 games and relieved in 11 others for Brooklyn in 1952, going 7-7, 4.25. He made one World Series appearance, giving up a triple to Mickey Mantle in relief of Joe Black.

    A sore arm hampered Rutherford in 1952, and it looks like it got worse after that. He didn't pitch at Triple-A in 1953 -- only at Fort Worth (AA) and Newport News (B). He didn't see much action in 1954, though at least he made it back to AAA. After an ineffective 1955 season, he retired.

    As a lot of people here know, Rutherford became a doctor. He went to college at University of Detroit Mercy and still lives in the Detroit suburbs today.

    I'm a little surprised that I haven't seen any interviews with him, but maybe he prefers not to do such things. Metrotheme, sounds like this is another mission for you!

  8. #208

    Interview with Ralph Branca and Joe Pignatano

    Caught up with Ralph Branca and Joe Pignatano at the Sports Angels charity Spring Kickoff Auction. See what they're up to with their charity work for the foundation.

    http://www.baseballhappenings.net/20...g-kickoff.html
    Baseball Happenings
    - Linking baseball's past, present and future.
    http://baseballhappenings.blogspot.com

  9. #209
    Ralph Branca reflects on Jackie Robinson's April 15, 1947 debut, shortly after his it's 62nd anniversary last week. To listen to the interview, check the link below.
    http://www.baseballhappenings.net/20...on-jackie.html
    Baseball Happenings
    - Linking baseball's past, present and future.
    http://baseballhappenings.blogspot.com

  10. #210
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    Morrie Martin

    This name didn't ring a bell with me at all, but shows what I know -- the lefty pitcher was in the majors for part or all of 10 seasons. His pro career lasted from 1941 to 1960, with time out for World War II from 1943-45.

    He made it to The Show in 1949. He pitched 10 games for Brooklyn, starting 4, and had a 7.04 ERA. It doesn't look like he was on the postseason roster.

    Here's a link to Morrie's page on the excellent Baseball in Wartime website:

    http://www.garybed.co.uk/player_biog...tin_morrie.htm

    Plus some other terrific stories from 2007 about his wartime experiences, with his personal recollections. Penicillin saved Morrie's leg and his baseball career.

    http://mlb.mlb.com/news/article.jsp?....jsp&c_id=null

    http://www.usatoday.com/sports/baseb...77065345_x.htm

  11. #211
    Rutherford answered a questionnaire that I sent him last year regarding his AAA experiences. I'm using it for the book that I am working on. He also signed a few items. From the answers he gave me, I think I would be able to get him on the phone.

    Quote Originally Posted by VIBaseball View Post

    I'm a little surprised that I haven't seen any interviews with him, but maybe he prefers not to do such things. Metrotheme, sounds like this is another mission for you!
    Baseball Happenings
    - Linking baseball's past, present and future.
    http://baseballhappenings.blogspot.com

  12. #212
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    Cliff Dapper

    This man is #10 on the list of oldest surviving Brooklyn Dodgers. He caught eight games for the 1942 Dodgers, but his pro career started in 1938 and ended in 1957 (with three years out during World War II).

    He was traded for broadcaster Ernie Harwell in 1948! The writeup on Dapper at the Baseball Reference bullpen has other good detail, so I don't need to duplicate that effort, or that of Baseball in Wartime.

    http://www.baseball-reference.com/bullpen/Cliff_Dapper

    http://www.baseballinwartime.co.uk/p...pper_cliff.htm

    He lives today in Fallbrook, California...Duke Snider territory.

  13. #213
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    Bob Borkowski

    This outfielder came to Brooklyn when the Dodgers traded Joe Black to Cincinnati in 1955 -- he was the player to be named later.

    He went 2 for 19 as a Dodger and was not on the postseason roster. That was his last major-league action, though his pro career continued through 1958.

    Borkowski is the subject of a SABR biography:

    http://bioproj.sabr.org/bioproj.cfm?...=1325&bid=1370

    He lives in Dayton, Ohio, the same place he was born.

  14. #214
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    Tim Thompson

    This Pennsylvanian was a catcher by trade, and he signed with the Dodgers in 1947. It's no wonder, then, that he didn't get a sniff of the majors until 1954 -- he was stuck behind Campy. Early in his pro career, he hit for good average but had hardly any power.

    Tim played in just 10 games for Brooklyn before going back to Montreal. He was dealt to Kansas City the next year for two guys who never wore the Dodger uniform, Tom Saffell and Lee Wheat. His last major-league action came with the Tigers in 1958, but he remained at Triple-A Toronto through 1962.

    He became a scout for the Dodgers, Cardinals, and Orioles. Here's former Dodger GM Fred Claire talking about Tim in 2003 (the article is on one of his finds, Joey Eischen).

    http://mlb.mlb.com/news/article.jsp?...=.jsp&c_id=mlb

    Among the players Tim signed for the Cards: Brian Jordan, John Mabry, and Tommy Herr.

    It looks like he splits his time between Pennsylvania (where he grew up) and Florida today. I'm not sure whether he's still actively scouting, though he was as of 2003 (when he was 79).

  15. #215
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    Ron Negray

    This pitcher originally signed with the Dodgers in 1949 and pitched four games for them in September 1952. He was traded to Philadelphia in June 1955 for cash and pitcher Dave Cole, who never got into a game for Brooklyn (his MLB career was over).

    After spending the rest of '55 and 1956 with the Phillies, Negray came back to the Dodgers in the Chico Fernandez deal. He didn't play again for Brooklyn but did get into four games for L.A. in '58. He spent the bulk of his career in Triple A, finishing in 1963.

    Negray was born in Akron, Ohio (where he was a big high school star) and still lives there today. That's true of quite a few of these old-timers. As of 1994, when he was 64, he was still a salesman for Russell Athletic Wear. One of his clients was the Cleveland Indians.

    The Akron Beacon Journal runs a story with him every several years or so. The last was in 2008 (this is just the intro, since it's not a free article).

    http://nl.newsbank.com/nl-search/we/...ckval=GooglePM

  16. #216
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    Quote Originally Posted by VIBaseball View Post
    This Pennsylvanian was a catcher by trade, and he signed with the Dodgers in 1947. It's no wonder, then, that he didn't get a sniff of the majors until 1954 -- he was stuck behind Campy. Early in his pro career, he hit for good average but had hardly any power.

    Tim played in just 10 games for Brooklyn before going back to Montreal. He was dealt to Kansas City the next year for two guys who never wore the Dodger uniform, Tom Saffell and Lee Wheat. His last major-league action came with the Tigers in 1958, but he remained at Triple-A Toronto through 1962.

    He became a scout for the Dodgers, Cardinals, and Orioles. Here's former Dodger GM Fred Claire talking about Tim in 2003 (the article is on one of his finds, Joey Eischen).

    http://mlb.mlb.com/news/article.jsp?...=.jsp&c_id=mlb

    Among the players Tim signed for the Cards: Brian Jordan, John Mabry, and Tommy Herr.

    It looks like he splits his time between Pennsylvania (where he grew up) and Florida today. I'm not sure whether he's still actively scouting, though he was as of 2003 (when he was 79).
    Sadly, Tim has passed. His son posts on this site on a regular basis.
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  17. #217
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    When did that happen, Ralph? I don't see it in Baseball-Reference.com (which often lags) or any news stories. Sorry to hear it.

  18. #218
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    Quote Originally Posted by VIBaseball View Post
    When did that happen, Ralph? I don't see it in Baseball-Reference.com (which often lags) or any news stories. Sorry to hear it.
    Baseball Almanac says I'm wrong, and gawd knows it isn't the foist time and won't be the last... Sorry.
    I confused Tim with Ferrell "Andy" Anderson... both catchers. Old men like me have faulty memories sometimes. :-)
    Last edited by Ralph Zig Tyko; 05-09-2009 at 12:00 AM.
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  19. #219
    I caught up with former Brooklyn Dodger farmhand and LA Dodger coach Danny Ozark a few months before his death for the book project I am working on. I have decided to publish excerpts from the interview that I had with him about his career in the Dodger organization. Enjoy!

    http://www.baseballhappenings.net/20...ager-wwii.html

    Death is never a timely thing, especially when there are questions that are left unanswered. That is the feeling that I had when I learned of Danny Ozark's passing on May 7, 2009. A few months earlier, I had interviewed a spry Ozark on his cell phone for almost an hour about his baseball career and his attempts to ascend through the Brooklyn Dodgers organization in the late 1940's and early 1950's. Ozark, like many others of his era, was whisked away from professional baseball to serve in World War II, only to return to a crowded minor league system that was about to experience the effects of integration.
    Baseball Happenings
    - Linking baseball's past, present and future.
    http://baseballhappenings.blogspot.com

  20. #220

    Dick Teed

    Back again after a long time away and need an assist regarding Dick Teed, catcher, who played seventeen years in the minor leagues with the Dodgers, Cardinals, and Phillies before he became a longtime scout.

    On July 24, 1953 Teed made his only ML appearance with the Dodgers as a pinch hitter, and struck out. Then it was back to the minors.

    Does anybody know the name of the player for whom he hit or the team the Dodgers played that day?

    I'm scratching my head over this one.
    Nothin' like fun at the ol' ballpark!

  21. #221
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    The Dodgers played the Milwaukee Braves that night. Dick Teed batted for Jim Hughes in the bottom of the seventh and struck out. The Braves won the game 11-6.

    http://www.retrosheet.org/boxesetc/1...240BRO1953.htm
    Last edited by EdTarbusz; 06-27-2009 at 10:21 AM.

  22. #222
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    dick teed

    the boxscore is listed in the retrosheet.org web site. he struck out for jim hughes in the 7th inning against max surkont. the braves won the game 11-6.

  23. #223

    Dick Teed

    Thanks, guys. I lost a bet on that one....twenty-five big ones.....cents, that is.
    Nothin' like fun at the ol' ballpark!

  24. #224
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    Eddie Basinski

    After Pee Wee Reese returned, this wartime Dodger (1944-45) was traded to the Pirates in December 1946 for lefty Al Gerheauser, who never pitched a game for Brooklyn.

    Basinski played 56 games for Pittsburgh in '47, and that was it for him in the majors. He played 12 more years in the PCL, however, mainly for Portland. I saw an amusing article from 1954 noting that he was apparently a skilled violinist. In fact, he played for the Buffalo Symphony Orchestra and supposedly also at Carnegie Hall, although I doubt that arenegie would really have billed him as "Basinski and his Magic Violinski."

    Eddie must have liked Oregon, because that's where he still lives today. Here's a piece from 2006:

    http://www.oursportscentral.com/serv...es/?id=3366907

  25. #225
    It is an absolute disgrace, that Eddie Basinski is not in the Polish Hall of Fame. We need to start a campaign, lets form a committee. Somebody pass me another beer.

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