View Poll Results: Which HOF player had the better MLB career?

Voters
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  • Joe DiMaggio

    12 16.00%
  • Stan Musial

    59 78.67%
  • Equal -- no real difference

    4 5.33%
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Thread: DiMaggio or Musial?

  1. #201
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Memphis,Tn
    Posts
    640
    Manager Joe McCarthy said that Dimaggio was the best base runner he ever saw!

  2. #202
    Just a few random thoughts about Musial from someone who saw him play at the end of his career, read quite a bit about him and had the pleasure of meeting a couple times...

    One of his many nicknames was "the Donora Greyhound" he also led the NL in triples 5 times and doubles 8 times. Gives me a pretty good idea that without a doubt Stan had pretty good wheels in his younger years. As far as defense it was already mentioned that he played the equivalent of about 3 seasons in CF. I'd guess he would have played it more in the 40's but the Cardinals still had Terry Moore, supposedly one of the great defensive CF's of all time. For the record, Stan said RF was his favorite position.

    Something not mentioned was his durability. At one time he had the longest NL consecutive game streak, 895 from 1952-1957.

    As far as comparison with Joe D, I honestly don't know how anyone can seriously compare 2 players from different leagues, different ballparks who faced completely different pitchers. Back in the days before inter-league trading just about the only way players changed leagues was if all other teams in their league waived on them. Which meant it was usually guys nobody else wanted or maybe someone at the end of their careers. A few exceptions, but for the most part players tended to stay in their respective leagues till late 50's.

    Regarding Stan's military service, the story I had heard was the he had an exemption because his father was ill from a lifetime of working in the steel mills and Stan was supporting him and his mother as well as a wife and child. I'm well aware that there was thousands of guys in a similar situation who did enlist anyway. My dad was one of them and at age 29 in 1941 he probably could have sat it out but he enlisted in the USN several days after Pearl Harbor. Never heard him speak badly of Stan or anyone else who had a legitimate deferment. If he was the starting LFer for the Cardinals instead of being a beer bottler for .77 an hour maybe his decision would have been different. Funny story though, my mom who was dating him at the time got quite pissed off because he was inducted and sent to Great Lakes NAS training on 12/31/41 and she didn't have a date for New Years Eve that night.
    It Might Be? It Could Be?? It Is!

  3. #203
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    The State of New England
    Posts
    6,166
    Quote Originally Posted by 64Cards View Post

    Regarding Stan's military service, the story I had heard was the he had an exemption because his father was ill from a lifetime of working in the steel mills and Stan was supporting him and his mother as well as a wife and child. I'm well aware that there was thousands of guys in a similar situation who did enlist anyway. My dad was one of them and at age 29 in 1941 he probably could have sat it out but he enlisted in the USN several days after Pearl Harbor. Never heard him speak badly of Stan or anyone else who had a legitimate deferment. If he was the starting LFer for the Cardinals instead of being a beer bottler for .77 an hour maybe his decision would have been different. Funny story though, my mom who was dating him at the time got quite pissed off because he was inducted and sent to Great Lakes NAS training on 12/31/41 and she didn't have a date for New Years Eve that night.
    My Grandfather was in a similar situation. He was helping support his Mother, had a pre-Pearl Harbor child and a child born during the war (my mother) and he was drafted in 1944 when he was 28. He may have never been drafted if he was living in St Louis instead of Cleveland.

  4. #204
    Unfortunate because Joe was not always Mr. nice guy some have to insert that into his play on the field.
    I judge Joe, two others with rough edges, Hornsby, Cobb and some others by what took place between the foul lines.

    When we see some members talking about how they don't like Joe, some go beyond that, is it not reasonable that it could possibly play into what the discussion is all about, Joe the ballplayer.

  5. #205
    Quote Originally Posted by SHOELESSJOE3 View Post
    Unfortunate because Joe was not always Mr. nice guy some have to insert that into his play on the field.
    I judge Joe, two others with rough edges, Hornsby, Cobb and some others by what took place between the foul lines.

    When we see some members talking about how they don't like Joe, some go beyond that, is it not reasonable that it could possibly play into what the discussion is all about, Joe the ballplayer.
    I plead guilty to letting that happen at one time, but not anymore. Joe's excellence is beyond dispute. I still contend it's not disrespecting him to say that Musial was a tick better career-wise and IMO peak as well (I give Joe the edge on defense, but I think Stan's superiority at bat gives him the overall edge; my own threshold is six Hall of Fame level seasons puts you in the running for greatness, and using OPS+ Stan's six best non-WWII seasons at bat are a smidge better than Joe's, and Joe never reached 200 as Stan did in '48).

    Like I said in Bothrops' Top 100 thread ... everyone that's being discussed is great, we're just getting between the layers of onion skin on the greatness meter with these discussions.

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