View Poll Results: Should Norm Siebern be in the Hall of Fame?

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  • Yes

    0 0%
  • No

    7 70.00%
  • Maybe

    0 0%
  • Not a Hall of Famer, but he had Hall of Fame potential

    3 30.00%
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Thread: Norm Siebern

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
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    Norm Siebern

    Norm Siebern spent 12 years in the majors, hitting .272 with 132 home runs, a 117 OPS+ and a solid .369 on-base percentage. He was an All-Star four times, won a Gold Glove, earned MVP votes three times (finishing as high as seventh) and twice led the league in putouts.

    He began his career with a .204 average in 54 games for the Yankees in 1956, and after not playing in the big leagues in 1957, he returned in 1958 and something clicked. His first year back, he won a Gold Glove and had a 136 OPS+. He embarked on a nine-year stretch in which his OPS+ never dropped below 106 in a season and in which his mark was 122 as a whole. From 1958 to 1966, he averaged 74 walks and only 76 strikeouts per season, while posting a .808 OPS. Perhaps the best run of years he had was 1960 to 1962, when he hit .295/.389/.481, averaging 88 walks, 21 home runs, 95 RBI and 84 runs a year, while posting a 132 OPS+. He led the league in games played, runs created and times on base in 1962; in 1964, he paced the loop in BBs. Defensively, he led the league in LF TZR and 1B TZR once each, as well.

    Siebern appeared in three World Series and won two rings, though he personally didn't do much to earn them -- in the '56 Fall Classic, he was hitless in his lone at-bat and in the 1958 World Series, he hit .125 in eight at-bats (though he got on base 36.4% of the time).

    Fun facts: He worked as a scout following his playing career. He also played college basketball. He was the minor league player of the year in 1957.

    What are your thoughts on Norm Siebern? Should he be in the Hall of Fame? Did he have Hall of Fame potential?

  2. #2
    Norm had 2 excellent seasons at age 24 and 28. For sure, had he been able to maintain something near that level for 8-10 years, he would have been a swell candidate. Unfortunately, his peak was far above the rest of his career. One can argue that he had the potential if one accepts those peaks as his potential skill. I lean that way, although I can't explain why the rest of his career was so flat.
    "It's better to look good, than be good."

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
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    I really would like to hear from the posters who were around back then. He is a stealth really good player from that mid 50s to mid 60s deadzone in the AL where the big stars were Mantle, Williams and Kaline and not much else on a consistent basis, maybe Colavito and for 60-62, Maris.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
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    An hour from Cooperstown
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    9,779
    Quote Originally Posted by PVNICK View Post
    I really would like to hear from the posters who were around back then. He is a stealth really good player from that mid 50s to mid 60s deadzone in the AL where the big stars were Mantle, Williams and Kaline and not much else on a consistent basis, maybe Colavito and for 60-62, Maris.
    I was eight years old in 1958 when the Yankees were paying the Milwaukee Braves in the World Series. Siebern lost a couple of balls in the sun in left field at Yankee Stadium, and IIRC, Casey Stengel mimicking him from the dugout, stumbling around looking up helplessly. Unfortunately, that's my only memory of Norm Siebern.
    There are two kinds of people in this game - those who have been humbled, and those who will be. - Terry Collins

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