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Thread: Run and Hit Play

  1. #1
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    Run and Hit Play

    How does the 'run and hit' play differ from the 'hit and run'?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by bkmckenna
    How does the 'run and hit' play differ from the 'hit and run'?
    Uhhh... never heard of the "Run and Hit" play

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Astro
    Uhhh... never heard of the "Run and Hit" play
    I've heard it, and I think there's a diffrence.
    Last edited by Williamsburg2599; 09-09-2006 at 03:41 PM.

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    I know Clark Griffith and Rube Foster used the play often.

  5. #5
    A run and hit play is when a fast runner is on base (one who steals). The runner takes off, and the batter decides whether a swing is a good idea (unlike a steal, where the batter shouldn't swing). This is unlike a hit and run, where the runner is off regardless of basestealing ability, and batters are expected to make contact, generally hoping to drive the ball behind the runner.

    At least, that's how I remember it.

  6. #6
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    They're the same, but 'run and hit' is more descriptive since the runner on first takes off before the hitter tries to hit behind him.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by marty1499
    They're the same, but 'run and hit' is more descriptive since the runner on first takes off before the hitter tries to hit behind him.
    I'm pretty sure they're not the same, because on a run and hit, the batter has the option of swinging, unlike in a hit and run, where it is expected.

    Also, the runner always takes off before the swing on a hit and run, too. There's no difference there, in description.
    Last edited by SoxSon; 09-09-2006 at 05:14 PM.

  8. #8
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    Just like men being left on base is the antithesis of a high OBP, the same for the hit-and-run play is the strikeout-throwout DP if the batter fails to connect well. Do well and you've got a guy going from 1B to 3B on a single, or scoring on a triple.
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mattingly
    Just like men being left on base is the antithesis of a high OBP, the same for the hit-and-run play is the strikeout-throwout DP if the batter fails to connect well.

    Do well and you've got a guy going from 1B to 3B on a single, or scoring on a triple.
    You don't have to hit-and-run, or run-and-hit, to score from 1B on a TRIPLE.

    Bob

  10. #10
    A "Run and Hit" is used on 3-1 and 3-2 counts with less that 2 outs generally. The Manager is trying to stay out of a double play by putting the runner in motion. In this situation the hitter must swing if the pitch is a strike because the runner in this situation isn't always a speed guy and if you take the strike he'll most likely be thrown out. This play is is usually used with a hitter that is a good contact guy.

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by hiddengem
    A "Run and Hit" is used on 3-1 and 3-2 counts with less that 2 outs generally. The Manager is trying to stay out of a double play by putting the runner in motion. In this situation the hitter must swing if the pitch is a strike because the runner in this situation isn't always a speed guy and if you take the strike he'll most likely be thrown out. This play is is usually used with a hitter that is a good contact guy.
    Thanks, HG. I suppose I'm a little confused, though. It seems like what you've described is essentially a hit and run...?

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by bluezebra
    You don't have to hit-and-run, or run-and-hit, to score from 1B on a TRIPLE.

    Bob
    I'd meant a double. Sometimes I'm just pooped when I type.
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by SoxSon
    A run and hit play is when a fast runner is on base (one who steals). The runner takes off, and the batter decides whether a swing is a good idea (unlike a steal, where the batter shouldn't swing). This is unlike a hit and run, where the runner is off regardless of basestealing ability, and batters are expected to make contact, generally hoping to drive the ball behind the runner.

    At least, that's how I remember it.
    You have described it as Red Barber described it a few short years ago. But some individuals seem unable to comprehend your fine explanation.
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  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by LouGehrig
    You have described it as Red Barber described it a few short years ago. But some individuals seem unable to comprehend your fine explanation.
    Thank you, Lou. I was actually starting to think that my memory was failing me.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by SoxSon
    Thank you, Lou. I was actually starting to think that my memory was failing me.
    Nahhhhhh, they couldn't understand past the heavy Bawston accent.
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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mattingly
    I'd meant a double. Sometimes I'm just pooped when I type.
    Welcome to the club.

    Bob

  17. #17
    Marty1499 said: They're the same, but 'run and hit' is more descriptive since the runner on first takes off before the hitter tries to hit behind him.
    That's how I'd heard it described by pedantic announcers who felt that the term "hit-and-run" was less descriptive because it reversed the sequence of events.

    SoxSon, I don't doubt your description of the instruction given to some batters sometimes occurs. So, I guess you can have three types of instructions given to the batter when a runner on first base is sent:

    1. A straight steal by a skilled basestealer: Don't swing at the pitch, or intentionally swing through the pitch (or at least a clear strike) in order to slow down the catcher).

    2. A steal by a decent player -- swinging is permitted by the batter at his discretion, but isn't demanded because the runner may steal anyway... but please don't hit a line drive at an infielder, or it's a sure double play. This seems to be what you're talking about.

    3. A classic hit-and-run, where the runner may be a slug and will surely be out if the pitch isn't hit somewhere.... and, as HG notes, is best if there's a three-ball count because the batter can let a certain ball go by.

    Still, I'm not sure what the difference in nomenclature is for #2 and #3.

  18. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Ursa Major
    That's how I'd heard it described by pedantic announcers who felt that the term "hit-and-run" was less descriptive because it reversed the sequence of events.

    SoxSon, I don't doubt your description of the instruction given to some batters sometimes occurs. So, I guess you can have three types of instructions given to the batter when a runner on first base is sent:

    1. A straight steal by a skilled basestealer: Don't swing at the pitch, or intentionally swing through the pitch (or at least a clear strike) in order to slow down the catcher).

    2. A steal by a decent player -- swinging is permitted by the batter at his discretion, but isn't demanded because the runner may steal anyway... but please don't hit a line drive at an infielder, or it's a sure double play. This seems to be what you're talking about.

    3. A classic hit-and-run, where the runner may be a slug and will surely be out if the pitch isn't hit somewhere.... and, as HG notes, is best if there's a three-ball count because the batter can let a certain ball go by.

    Still, I'm not sure what the difference in nomenclature is for #2 and #3.

    Yes, I think you're right, Ursa. I think the difference between #2 and #3 is exactly the difference between a "run-and-hit" and a "hit-and-run." An addition to what you've written is that the runner's speed is much less of a factor for the traditional hit and run (or #3).

  19. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by SoxSon
    Thanks, HG. I suppose I'm a little confused, though. It seems like what you've described is essentially a hit and run...?
    No, because the hitter doesn't have to swing if the pitch is a ball.

  20. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by hiddengem
    No, because the hitter doesn't have to swing if the pitch is a ball.
    Ok. In post #10, I must have glossed over the "if it's a strike" part. I just saw "must swing." All clear now, I think.

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