View Poll Results: Jimmie Foxx

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  • I rank Foxx a Top 10 Player.

    10 12.35%
  • I rank Foxx a Top 20 Player.

    39 48.15%
  • I rank Foxx a Top 30 Player.

    19 23.46%
  • I rank Foxx a Top 40 Player.

    2 2.47%
  • I rank Foxx a Top 50 Player.

    0 0%
  • I do not include Foxx among my Top 50 Players.

    1 1.23%
  • I rate Foxx's 1932 season as one of the best ever.

    1 1.23%
  • I do not rate Foxx's 1932 season as one of the best ever.

    0 0%
  • I consider Foxx an all time historically great player.

    6 7.41%
  • I do NOT consider Foxx an all time historically great player.

    2 2.47%
  • I still rank Foxx a Top 10 Slugger. (Added belatedly after first 56 votes.

    1 1.23%
  • I do NOT still rank Foxx a Top 10 Slugger. (Added belatedly after first 56 votes.

    0 0%
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Results 141 to 160 of 167

Thread: Jimmie Foxx Thread

  1. #141
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    I believe that this is the earliest known professional baseball image of Foxx, 1924 Easton...............
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #142
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    Quote Originally Posted by bcbgcbrcb View Post
    I believe that this is the earliest known professional baseball image of Foxx, 1924 Easton...............
    Wow, that is a really cool photo. Do you have a link to the unedited source photo?
    Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

  3. #143
    Quote Originally Posted by bcbgcbrcb View Post
    I believe that this is the earliest known professional baseball image of Foxx, 1924 Easton...............
    Great pic, almost a 3D effect, sharp.

  4. #144
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    Quote Originally Posted by bcbgcbrcb View Post
    I believe that this is the earliest known professional baseball image of Foxx, 1924 Easton...............
    Tough looking guy.
    Chop! Chop! Chop!

  5. #145
    Quote Originally Posted by bcbgcbrcb View Post
    I believe that this is the earliest known professional baseball image of Foxx, 1924 Easton...............
    Wow, even in that baggy loose uniform he looks built, very well built. Talk about a hitter who could really crush a ball.

  6. #146
    This is my first post and wanted to say how much i enjoyed reading this thread. I loved the excerpts from Werber's book; especially the story about the race.

    From the time I was a little kid i was regaled with stories about Jimmie Foxx by my dad. Even though he lived just down the road from Boston in Rhode Island his idol was Jimmie Foxx. I heard all the stories about Foxx and the A's, including the famous 10 run inning in the 1929 World Series. My dad was disappointed when Mack broke up the team but they couldn't have sent Foxx to a better place. Naturally Foxx is my favorite player from that era. As others have noted he was a great guy, always picking up the tab at restaurants, etc. Just such a shame the way his life ended up. I'll freely admit my bias but The Beast is in my top 10.

  7. #147
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    Been to Double XX hometown in MD and played ball with my son in Lakewood Ohio on Jimmie Foxx Field. Larger than life IMO.
    Whitey Ashburn's free plug on radio when he was hungry...." Happy birthday to the Celebrese twins....Plain and Pepperoni. "

  8. #148
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    The more I read about Foxx's all around athletic ability the more I am impressed. I was wondering why Foxx didn't play the outfield? He wasn't slow afoot. He must have had at least a decent arm to start out at 3B and also catch in the majors.
    Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

  9. #149
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    Quote Originally Posted by Honus Wagner Rules View Post
    The more I read about Foxx's all around athletic ability the more I am impressed. I was wondering why Foxx didn't play the outfield? He wasn't slow afoot. He must have had at least a decent arm to start out at 3B and also catch in the majors.
    It's possible he lacked the natural instincts needed to get proper reads. Could be, he couldn't track flight speed, distance, and predicted path of balls batted in the air.

    Perhaps he just didn't feel comfortable out there and squashed the notion if a coach ever brought it up.

    Maybe his disposition was more suited toward the infield where more action takes place.

    The throwing motion of an infielder and especially catcher is much different from an outfielders, where dropping the ball below the belt, creating a longer sweeping throw with a true 4-seam flight is necessary. It's likely that style didn't suit his strength and he was more comfortable doing what he'd done all his life.

    I've wondered the same thing Adam. From the outside looking in, it seems he had all the tools, but the answer might just simply be, he didn't want to.
    "By common consent, Ruth was the hardest hitter of history; a fine fielder, if not a finished one; an inspired base runner, seeming to do the right thing without thinking. He had the most perfect co-ordination of any human animal I ever knew." - Hugh Fullerton, 1936 (Chicago sports writer, 1893-1930's)

    ROY / ERA+ Title / Cy Young / WS MVP / HR Title / Gold Glove / Comeback POY / BA Title / MVP / All Star / HOF

  10. #150
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sultan_1895-1948 View Post
    It's possible he lacked the natural instincts needed to get proper reads. Could be, he couldn't track flight speed, distance, and predicted path of balls batted in the air.

    Perhaps he just didn't feel comfortable out there and squashed the notion if a coach ever brought it up.

    Maybe his disposition was more suited toward the infield where more action takes place.

    The throwing motion of an infielder and especially catcher is much different from an outfielders, where dropping the ball below the belt, creating a longer sweeping throw with a true 4-seam flight is necessary. It's likely that style didn't suit his strength and he was more comfortable doing what he'd done all his life.

    I've wondered the same thing Adam. From the outside looking in, it seems he had all the tools, but the answer might just simply be, he didn't want to.
    Mack didn't want him to be. The A's at the time Foxx came up already had a rock solid outfield of Simmons, Haas and Miller.
    A swing--and a smash--and a gray streak partaking/Of ghostly manoeuvres that follow the whack;/The old earth rebounds with a quiver and quaking/And high flies the dust as he thuds on the track;/The atmosphere reels--and it isn't the comet--/There follows the blur of a phantom at play;/Then out from the reel comes the glitter of steel--/And damned be the fellow that gets in the way.                 A swing and a smash--and the far echoes quiver--/A ripping and rearing and volcanic roar;/And off streaks the Ghost with a shake and a shiver,/To hurdle red hell on the way to a score;/A cross between tidal wave, cyclone and earthquake--/Fire, wind and water all out on a lark;/Then out from the reel comes the glitter of steel,/Plus ten tons of dynamite hitched to a spark.

    --Cobb, Grantland Rice

  11. #151
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sultan_1895-1948 View Post
    It's possible he lacked the natural instincts needed to get proper reads. Could be, he couldn't track flight speed, distance, and predicted path of balls batted in the air.

    Perhaps he just didn't feel comfortable out there and squashed the notion if a coach ever brought it up.

    Maybe his disposition was more suited toward the infield where more action takes place.

    The throwing motion of an infielder and especially catcher is much different from an outfielders, where dropping the ball below the belt, creating a longer sweeping throw with a true 4-seam flight is necessary. It's likely that style didn't suit his strength and he was more comfortable doing what he'd done all his life.

    I've wondered the same thing Adam. From the outside looking in, it seems he had all the tools, but the answer might just simply be, he didn't want to.
    All good observations, Randy. I wonder if Foxx played some outfield as an amateur ballplayer?
    Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

  12. #152
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    Quote Originally Posted by HitchedtoaSpark View Post
    Mack didn't want him to be. The A's at the time Foxx came up already had a rock solid outfield of Simmons, Haas and Miller.
    Thanks Hitched. He was one hell of an athlete. Do you know if they ever tried him out there, or if anyone did prior?

    Btw...which Foxx book is better....Pride of Sudlersville or Life and Times?
    "By common consent, Ruth was the hardest hitter of history; a fine fielder, if not a finished one; an inspired base runner, seeming to do the right thing without thinking. He had the most perfect co-ordination of any human animal I ever knew." - Hugh Fullerton, 1936 (Chicago sports writer, 1893-1930's)

    ROY / ERA+ Title / Cy Young / WS MVP / HR Title / Gold Glove / Comeback POY / BA Title / MVP / All Star / HOF

  13. #153
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    Jimmy easily top 25 say or so. Wonderful player who did a lot very well, sad private life later on. You wonder how he would have done sober.

  14. #154
    Don't forget Foxx's time as a pitcher

    Maybe you haven't, but I'm not going to read this whole thread just for that.

    But I did just learn that Foxx pitched 23.2 innings in his career, with a 1.52 ERA.

  15. #155
    Don't forget Foxx's time as a pitcher

    Maybe you haven't, but I'm not going to read this whole thread just for that.

    But I did just learn that Foxx pitched 23.2 innings in his career, with a 1.52 ERA.

  16. #156
    My grandmother's brother played high school baseball with Jimmie Foxx in fact when he was alive he showed me photos of him and Jimmie when they were in high school.

  17. #157
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    Great thread on one of my favorites of all time. I myself think he is underrated in comparison to people like Gehrig, Aaron, Musial, and others. I feel the same about Clemente too. Why? Because guys like Clemente and Foxx were superior athletes. They might not have the statistics everyone likes, but when evaluating a player I like to consider the athletic ability he was blessed with and how it stacks up against his peers. Numbers only show so much. For his day, Jimmie Foxx was a supreme athlete. Was Gehrig faster than Foxx? Did he have more raw power? No. Gehrig might have won more but there is a certain hype that also comes with playing in markets like NY.

    I like to go by who had more tools, which is hard to do with players who died before I was even born. Not to disregard stats. They have their place as well but even average players can have impressive statistical years here and there.

    I actually heard Jimmie Foxx was discovered when a scout was passing through his town on his way to see another prospect. Jimmie pointed the scout in the direction of the next town using a plow, lifting it up with one arm as if it were a baseball bat. At age 16.

    I just really respect these guys like Mantle and Foxx who built themselves into incredibly strong men by hard manual labor. No steroids, not even trained hitters. Just incredible physical specimines who were born to be average sized men but built themselves into superheroes through hard work. No coincidence that they were perhaps #2 and #3 on the all time list of great distance hitters. Going off what I heard Babe Ruth is number one. But from the stories I heard about Foxx it appears he hit the ball just as hard just as consistently.

    A poster earlier commented Jimmie cleared the left field roof at Shibe 18 times, I heard it was 24-28 times. Several of them landed on Sommerset. Then there was the Yankee Stadium upper decker line drive that supposedly would have gone 530 feet had the shattered seat not blocked the ball's flight. They say had he hit the ball more towards left center it would have left the stadium. This sounds more believable than the romantic tales of Josh Gibson.

    He was the king of Comiskey Park roof shots too, I heard one cleared the entire back side of the roof. Of course this was when the roof was further from the plate than the more modernized version of Comiskey when Kittle and Luzinski hit their roof shots.

    Going off of his raw athletic ability, skill set and the numbers he had, most of which were accumulated before age 32, I have to put Foxx in my top 5. I also respect the guys with lesser talent who work extremely hard to become stars with a more average skill set. But if I was picking a team, I would pick the guys that strike fear into their opponents, have a good set of career stats, and have the most athletic ability. No disrespect to Gehrig, but if it was Foxx who played in NY with all the media hype, and Gehrig playing his prime years in Philadelphia, I do not believe Gehrig would be as remembered as Foxx. That is how legendary Foxx is.

    I never was the type to sort through all these stats and it seems as if they invent new ones every day. But a lot of statistics are based upon opportunity and aren't the best way to measure who was truly the best baseball player. All I know is I am far more impressed with the guys of yesteryear who hit 30-50 homers a season in ballparks where center field was 450 feet away with 400 plus foot power alleys and swinging those 40 ounce clubs than I am impressed with modern juiced up strikeout kings hitting 380 foot steroid aided pop flys that wouldn't have even made the warning track at many older ballparks like Yankee Stadium or Forbes Field. Yes Jimmie Foxx played at Fenway. But the monster, while being able to turn pop ups into 330 foot home runs, can also turn what would have been a 400 foot line drive home run into a single or double.

    I enjoy some of the modern guys too. They do have a lot more 101 mph fastballs to contend with today but MLB has always been played on a high level and there have always been great pitchers throughout history.
    Last edited by John239; 02-17-2017 at 08:12 AM.

  18. #158
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    Sounds like you'd really enjoy Bill Jenkinson's book Baseball's Ultimate Power. You can buy the e-book for about ten bucks. An incredible in depth look at many historical sluggers. Double X is indeed on the short list, although he, along with everyone in history falls short of Ruth. That is an irrefutable fact but is no slight on anyone.
    "By common consent, Ruth was the hardest hitter of history; a fine fielder, if not a finished one; an inspired base runner, seeming to do the right thing without thinking. He had the most perfect co-ordination of any human animal I ever knew." - Hugh Fullerton, 1936 (Chicago sports writer, 1893-1930's)

    ROY / ERA+ Title / Cy Young / WS MVP / HR Title / Gold Glove / Comeback POY / BA Title / MVP / All Star / HOF

  19. #159
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sultan_1895-1948 View Post
    Sounds like you'd really enjoy Bill Jenkinson's book Baseball's Ultimate Power. You can buy the e-book for about ten bucks. An incredible in depth look at many historical sluggers. Double X is indeed on the short list, although he, along with everyone in history falls short of Ruth. That is an irrefutable fact but is no slight on anyone.
    How many versions of Jenkinson's book are there? I skimmed it maybe three years ago from a friend and now plan on buying it, but don't want to get the first version if it has been updated recently.
    "If on-base percentage is so important, then why don't they put it on the scoreboard?" -Jeff Francoeur"

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  20. #160
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    Quote Originally Posted by Toledo Inquisition View Post
    How many versions of Jenkinson's book are there? I skimmed it maybe three years ago from a friend and now plan on buying it, but don't want to get the first version if it has been updated recently.
    Just one edition far as I know. It's not too old and no reason to update unless adding modern guys.

    I know this is a Foxx thread, but on a side note he recently finished a side project favor, finding all Ruth's PA against both Grove and Walter. Think he's missing just one PA off Walter. I'll post on the BR thread asap
    "By common consent, Ruth was the hardest hitter of history; a fine fielder, if not a finished one; an inspired base runner, seeming to do the right thing without thinking. He had the most perfect co-ordination of any human animal I ever knew." - Hugh Fullerton, 1936 (Chicago sports writer, 1893-1930's)

    ROY / ERA+ Title / Cy Young / WS MVP / HR Title / Gold Glove / Comeback POY / BA Title / MVP / All Star / HOF

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