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Thread: Greatest Manager in Baseball History

  1. Greatest Manager in Baseball History

    Who in your opinion is the greatest Manager in Baseball history? Here's my top three:

    1) Ned Hanlon

    2) John McGraw

    3) Connie Mack

  2. #2
    Joe McCarthy and Casey Stengal don't make the cut?

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rickey_Henderson
    Who in your opinion is the greatest Manager in Baseball history? Here's my top three:

    1) Ned Hanlon

    2) John McGraw

    3) Connie Mack
    None of these are even in the top twenty-five
    Mythical SF Chronicle scouting report: "That Jeff runs like a deer. Unfortunately, he also hits AND throws like one." I am Venus DeMilo - NO ARM! I can play like a big leaguer, I can field like Luzinski, run like Lombardi. The secret to managing is keeping the ones who hate you away from the undecided ones. I am a triumph of quantity over quality. I'm almost useful, every village needs an idiot.
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by four tool
    Joe McCarthy and Casey Stengal don't make the cut?
    Neither of these are in the top twenty-five either
    Mythical SF Chronicle scouting report: "That Jeff runs like a deer. Unfortunately, he also hits AND throws like one." I am Venus DeMilo - NO ARM! I can play like a big leaguer, I can field like Luzinski, run like Lombardi. The secret to managing is keeping the ones who hate you away from the undecided ones. I am a triumph of quantity over quality. I'm almost useful, every village needs an idiot.
    Good traders: MadHatter(2), BoofBonser26, StormSurge

  5. #5
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    I have always liked Dick Williams. He led the BoSox to the WS in '67, the A's in '71-'73 and the Padres in '84. He also had a winning record with the perennially weak Expos each year from 1979-1981, and was one game away from the WS in '81, bowing to LA 3 games to two in the NLCS. He came that close to being manager of FOUR WS teams! He isn't often mentioned in the same breath as Stengel, McGraw, Mack, etc because his overall record wasn't outstanding, but I think he was among the game's greatest motivators. Many of the biggest winners had so many great players to work with, I have tried to avoid them (except for McGraw who was in a class by himself, IMO)

    I love Joe McCarthy as well. There are so many. Here's my top three:

    1) McGraw
    2) Tommy Lasorda (da MAN!)
    3) Dick Williams
    Always go to other people's funerals, otherwise they won't come to yours. - Yogi Berra

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dodgerfan1
    I have always liked Dick Williams. He led the BoSox to the WS in '67, the A's in '71-'73 and the Padres in '84. He also had a winning record with the perennially weak Expos each year from 1979-1981, and were one game away from the WS, bowing to LA 3 games to two in the NLCS. He came that close to being manager of FOUR WS teams! He isn't often mentioned in the same breath as Stengel, McGraw, Mack, etc because his overall record wasn't outstanding, but I think he was among the game's greatest motivators. Many of the biggest winners had so many great players to work with, I have tried to avoid them (except for McGraw who was in a class by himself, IMO)

    I love Joe McCarthy as well. There are so many. Here's my top three:

    1) McGraw
    2) Tommy Lasorda (da MAN!)
    3) Dick Williams

    Not top 25 either

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    "And their chances of getting back into this ballgame are growing dimmer by the batter."


    Put it in the books.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlecBoy006
    Not top 25 either
    Well dang, we probably agree on this too Everybody always gives the Yank managers that were given all the horses. You guys forgot Torre
    Mythical SF Chronicle scouting report: "That Jeff runs like a deer. Unfortunately, he also hits AND throws like one." I am Venus DeMilo - NO ARM! I can play like a big leaguer, I can field like Luzinski, run like Lombardi. The secret to managing is keeping the ones who hate you away from the undecided ones. I am a triumph of quantity over quality. I'm almost useful, every village needs an idiot.
    Good traders: MadHatter(2), BoofBonser26, StormSurge

  9. #9


    Early Years: Harry Wright, Cap Anson, Frank Selee & Ned Hanlon

    Transition Years: Little Napolean McGraw

    Early Modern Era: Miller Huggins

    Modern: Joe McCarthy, Casey Stengel, Al Lopez & Walter Alston

    Modern Contenders: Sparky Anderson, Bobby Cox, Tony La Russa & Joe Torre

    ___________________________________________________ _______________

    If I could only pick one Modern Guy: Joe McCarthy

    The Most Underrated: Al Lopez

    Last edited by TRfromBR; 02-08-2007 at 05:24 PM.

  10. #10
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    Joe McCarthy
    "I was pitching one day when my glasses clouded up on me. I took them off to polish them. When I looked up to the plate, I saw Jimmie Foxx. The sight of him terrified me so much that I haven't been able to wear glasses since." - Left Gomez

    "(Lou) Gehrig never learned that a ballplayer couldn't be good every day." - Hank Gowdy

  11. #11
    I like Walter Alston because his teams won a World Series with the powerful mid-50s Dodgers and then with pitching a decade later... not that the other sides weren't good, but the Snider lineups and Koufax rotations were like standards after WWII.

    But he isn't for greatest ever, necessarily. Bobby Cox is something else.
    Last edited by plask_stirlac; 02-08-2007 at 05:47 PM.
    (fantasy football)
    JM: Only did that for a couple of years and then we had a conspiracy so it kind of turned me sour. Our league's commissioner, Lew Ford(notes) at the time, was doing some shady things that ... I'd rather not talk about [laughs].
    DB: Isn't he in Japan right now?
    JM: I don't know where Lou is right now. He's probably fleeing the authorities [laughs].

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Myankee4life
    Joe McCarthy
    Of all of those mentioned, McCarthy never suffered a losing season. Unheard of!

    Brownie31

  13. #13
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    McCarthy had the luck of always having great talent on his teams before he arrived, in the Cubs he had Hosrnsby, Cuyler, Hack Wilson, and Hartnett. Later in the Yankees he had Dickey, Ruth in his last years, Gehrig, DiMaggio, Gordon, etc. And later with Boston he had Ted Williams, Dom DiMaggio, Vern Stephens, and other great players, he was the Phil Jackson of Baseball.

    Of the current managers, only 2 good managers come to mind, Bobby Cox and Tony LaRussa, made the Blue Jays to a contender in the mid-1980s, and later as GM and later Manager of the Braves in the 1990s, he built another contender team, for years and years.
    Last Player to hit for the Cycle: Matt Kemp, San Diego Padres (August 14, 2015)

    Last Pitcher to throw a Regular Season No-Hitter: Max Scherzer, Washington Nationals 2-0 (October 3, 2015)

    Last Pitcher to throw a Postseason No-Hitter: Roy Halladay, Philadelphia Phillies 4-0 (October 6, 2010)

  14. #14
    I'd add Herzog as one the best recent mgrs. His work with K.C. and St.L. was excellent.

  15. #15
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    Walter Alston is my pick. Hands down.

    Alston won 7 pennants and 4 World Championships with the Dodgers. He did this in a highly competitive National League. He won a World Championship with a great team (the 1955 Dodgers) and with a terrible team (the 1959 Dodgers, possibly the worst World Champion ever). He was not a self promoter, but he led with quiet strength.

    Alston never gave alibis, never. He, and he alone, faced the press after the 1962 debacle, in which the Dodgers, a super team, let a pennant slip away in a 3 game playoff. He called his whole team out and challenged them to a fight during a complaint session on a bus in 1963; the Dodgers zoomed to the World Championship from then on.

    Alston won World Championships under intense pressure. In 1955, he was being compared to Charlie Dressen, who won the pennant in 1953. In 1959, his job was in jeopardy after the Braves won 2 pennants in a row. In 1963, he was under the gun for the slipping away of the 1962 pennant, and he had both Dressen AND Leo Durocher competing for his job.

    Alston was quiet. He managed in New York and Los Angeles, but never seemed to get much fame from that; he was surprisingly anonymous, and I am surprised that more people haven't mentioned him in this thread. If I wanted to find a manager that could win under ANY circumstances, my search would start with Walter Alston, who did, in fact, win under a wider variety of circumstances than any other manager I can think of.
    "I do not care if half the league strikes. Those who do it will encounter quick retribution. All will be suspended and I don't care if it wrecks the National League for five years. This is the United States of America and one citizen has as much right to play as another. The National League will go down the line with Robinson whatever the consequences. You will find if you go through with your intention that you have been guilty of complete madness."

    NL President Ford Frick, 1947

  16. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by geezer
    McCarthy had the luck of always having great talent on his teams before he arrived, in the Cubs he had Hosrnsby, Cuyler, Hack Wilson, and Hartnett. Later in the Yankees he had Dickey, Ruth in his last years, Gehrig, DiMaggio, Gordon, etc. And later with Boston he had Ted Williams, Dom DiMaggio, Vern Stephens, and other great players, he was the Phil Jackson of Baseball.
    I'll agree that he had great players, but you can't win 7 WSs with just any manager. Never once playing in the Majors, McCarthy introduced control and the Commandments of Baseball to earn his titles. He required all his players to dress appropriately wherever they were. Also, he performed well wherever he went, transforming the Cubs and Yankees into better clubs.

    In 1925, the Cubs were 72-82 with 773 allowed. Enter Marse Joe and you go 82-72 with 602 runs allowed. That's big. From 1926-1929, his win percentage increased from .532, .556, .591, and finally .645. That's progressive management and shows a lot about the head coach. Oh, not to mention he won a Pennant.

    In 1932, the Yankees hadn't won the WSs in 4 years. They had a powerful lineup, including 2 of the top 10 players, and a respectable pitching staff, but still no WS. Enter McCarthy and he wins a WS a year after he is manager. I won't even get into his Yankees stats, because they're already known as being stellar. But McCarthy was able to control so many different types of players -- from Babe Ruth to Lou and Joe D. Three different personalities, but three great players. Also, many people consider the 1939 season one of the greatest seasons of all-time (even though 1927 statistically is better).

    In 1948 he joins the BoSox and still gives them two .600 seasons. It shows he is fine wherever he goes.

    Finally, he finished his career with the most WSs (tied with Casey) and highest winning percentage among all managers -- .615.

    That's my take.
    "In the beginning I used to make one terrible play a game. Then I got so I'd make one a week and finally I'd pull a bad one about once a month. Now, I'm trying to keep it down to one a season."


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  17. #17
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    We surveyed 100 RMBs (the scariest thought yet and asked them who are the best major league managers. The top twenty-seven answers are on the board (and you don't have to smooch Richard Dawson). Three strikes and the "other" team can steal. I need an answer

    1. ?
    2. ?
    3. ?
    4. ?
    5. ?
    6. ?
    7. ?
    8. ?
    9. ?
    10. ?
    11. ?
    12. ?
    13. ?
    14. ?
    15. ?
    16. ?
    17. ?
    18. ?
    19. ?
    20. ?
    21. ?
    22. ?
    23. ?
    24. ?
    25. ?
    26. ?
    27. ?
    Mythical SF Chronicle scouting report: "That Jeff runs like a deer. Unfortunately, he also hits AND throws like one." I am Venus DeMilo - NO ARM! I can play like a big leaguer, I can field like Luzinski, run like Lombardi. The secret to managing is keeping the ones who hate you away from the undecided ones. I am a triumph of quantity over quality. I'm almost useful, every village needs an idiot.
    Good traders: MadHatter(2), BoofBonser26, StormSurge

  18. #18
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    My top five:

    1. Miller Huggins
    2. Ned Hanlon
    3. John McGraw
    4. Earl Weaver
    5. Joe McCarthy
    "Simply put, the passion, interest and tradition surrounding baseball in New York is unmatched."

    Sean McAdam, ESPN.com

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by RuthMayBond
    We surveyed 100 RMBs (the scariest thought yet and asked them who are the best major league managers. The top twenty-seven answers are on the board (and you don't have to smooch Richard Dawson). Three strikes and the "other" team can steal. I need an answer
    1. ?
    2. ?
    3. ?
    4. ?
    5. Weaver
    6. ?
    7. ?
    8. ?
    9. ?
    10. ?
    11. ?
    12. ?
    13. ?
    14. Huggins
    15. ?
    16. ?
    17. ?
    18. ?
    19. ?
    20. ?
    21. ?
    22. ?
    23. ?
    24. ?
    25. ?
    26. ?
    27. ?
    Mythical SF Chronicle scouting report: "That Jeff runs like a deer. Unfortunately, he also hits AND throws like one." I am Venus DeMilo - NO ARM! I can play like a big leaguer, I can field like Luzinski, run like Lombardi. The secret to managing is keeping the ones who hate you away from the undecided ones. I am a triumph of quantity over quality. I'm almost useful, every village needs an idiot.
    Good traders: MadHatter(2), BoofBonser26, StormSurge

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by ElHalo
    My top five:

    1. Miller Huggins
    Survey says #14

    <2. Ned Hanlon>

    X

    <3. John McGraw>

    XX

    <4. Earl Weaver>

    Survey says #5

    <5. Joe McCarthy>

    XXX
    The other team can steal the question from the ElHalo team
    Mythical SF Chronicle scouting report: "That Jeff runs like a deer. Unfortunately, he also hits AND throws like one." I am Venus DeMilo - NO ARM! I can play like a big leaguer, I can field like Luzinski, run like Lombardi. The secret to managing is keeping the ones who hate you away from the undecided ones. I am a triumph of quantity over quality. I'm almost useful, every village needs an idiot.
    Good traders: MadHatter(2), BoofBonser26, StormSurge

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