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Thread: Meet The Sports Writers

  1. #201
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    James Thomas Farrell

    Born: February 27, 1904, Chicago, IL
    Died: August 22, 1979, New York City, NY, age 75

    Book author;
    Wrote 1 baseball book, My Baseball Diary, 1957;
    also wrote 52 other books, the most popular of which was: Studs Lonigan (1932) and its 2 sequels in 1934 and 1935.
    Had a life-long love for baseball.

    James T. Farrell was born into a working-class second generation Irish-Catholic family living in Chicago in 1904. Farrell's father, James Farrell, was a struggling teamster (truck driver) who was unable to support the ever-growing family (the Farrell's had a total of fifteen children, out of which only six survived). In response to the hard times Farrell's father sent three-year-old James to live with his grandparents, who were both born in Ireland and who were both illiterate, who were living relatively comfortably in Chicago as a result of a generous income provided by some of their more wealthy/successful children. And although Farrell's real parents had times where they were relatively well-off, even living near Farrell and his grandparents in a nearby apartment at one point, most of their lives were spent living in whatever kind of housing they could afford at the time.

    When Farrell was about fifteen-years-old, he and his grandparents moved to the South Fifties, the neighborhood that would later serve as the basis for a young Irish-Catholic boy named Studs Lonigan in one of Farrell's most renown books.

    Not much else about Farrell's young life is known, but apparently he did well enough in school to make his way into the University of Chicago in 1925. There, he completed six terms of schooling, until in 1927 he said, in one of his most famous quotes, that he would write "regardless of the consequences". Farrell also is recorded as saying that the "greatest achievement in the world was to earn for yourself the right to say-I am an artist". Farrell first step to "becoming an artist" came in 1929 when he published the short story, "Slob."

    Farrell's most famous works, though, came in the first half of the 1930s. In 1931 he and his new wife Dorothy Butler (who he married not once but twice were in Paris, where Farrell was largely on a "self-discovery" type of mission, where he tried "the expatriate life and [discovered] it had little meaning to him". In 1932, Farrell came back to his home in New York City, where he lived until the day of his death.

    During his time in Paris, Farrell finished writing and had published the first installment of the Studs Lonigan trilogy-Young Lonigan, in 1931. After Farrell had returned from Paris with his wife, he continued on the rest of the trilogy, publishing The Young Manhood of Studs Lonigan in 1934, and the final part of the trilogy, Judgment Day, in 1935.

    After this time, Farrell sunk into a period of "critical neglect" that lasted for the majority of the remainder of his life. Instead of taking his time writing better thought-out and more innovative novels, Farrell wrote a large number of books and novels in place of the lack of critical praise he was getting. By the time of Farrell's death in 1979, he "left over fifty books of stories and novels behind him, roughly one for each year of his writing career".

    Studs Lonigan is a trilogy of books (Young Lonigan, The Young Manhood of Studs Lonigan, and Judgment Day) that details the life of a young lower-middle-class Irish boy living in Chicago from 1916 up until his death in 1931 as a result of "double-pneumonia." Studs Lonigan is the perfect caricature of the "tragic hero." He is not a terribly smart boy by nature, which is even further hindered by Studs' decision to not continue his education past his Irish-Catholic middle school, St. Patrick's. Though what Studs lacks in intelligence, he makes up for in his natural athleticism and his innate kindness and caring for the people around him. Unfortunately, Studs is put into a position in his life where he simply cannot "win." While he would like to be himself, a relatively kind-natured, emotional boy with a lot potential, the society of the time tells him he should be an Irish-Catholic with the fear of God in him, and also live up to the traditional traits of men: a hard, unemotional, tough guy.

    In Studs Lonigan, Farrell demonstrates a lot of the innate qualities that he possesses as a writer. Studs Lonigan is an interesting mix of both Naturalism and Realism, two important literary methods of thought in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Another one of the very unique traits which Farrell employed as a means to further developer Studs is the technique of "stream of consciousness" (the process of describing a character's thoughts as they occur to the character). Through these techniques, Farrell is able to fully develop the dark, gritty, and depressing world that Studs lives in, while simultaneously making Studs into a fully three-dimensional character with whom readers can both sympathize with and even despise at times.

    Farrell also displays a lot of his own thoughts and feelings about a number of aspects of his life through the story of Studs Lonigan. One example of this is the complaints he shows about the Irish-Catholic religion, which he refused to acknowledge as a personal practice relatively early in his life, which is present even in the very early pages of Studs Lonigan's first book, Young Lonigan, where Studs reflects a number of times about the contradictions and complexities of his teachings from his Irish-Catholic school.

    Studs Lonigan, in the later book especially, is a very telling and accurate description of life during the Great Depression. The Lonigan family faces a number of very troubling happenings as Stud Lonigan's father begins to really feel the heat of the problems which the depression is starting to impart upon him, as his painting business, which he established through nothing outside of his own hard work, fails. Studs, also, faces the troubles of the times as some of the money he had saved up and decides to invest in the stock market comes back to haunt him as the market continues to fall.

    Studs Lonigan is one of the great aspects of American literature, especially Chicago literature, and is in, in part, a "great American tragedy." Studs Lonigan is consistently put into realistic situations which he simply cannot hope to be successful in; Studs Lonigan is the story of a good boy who is simply unable to live against the forces of life, no matter what he does. In the end, Studs' death is an even more depressing end to a depressing tale about a young boy not necessarily because he simply dies, but because his death actually brings Studs' closer to happiness than anything else outside a few instances in his early life could.


    NYC, 1947: Israel Feinberg, VP ILGWU; James Farrell; and Bernard Englander, World War II veteran and head of Optical---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------June 25, 1973
    Unit, International Solidarity Committee, help with overseas CARE package, at 303 4th Ave. in New York, 1947.


    February 16, 1963: New York: The Ghost Of Studs Lonigan. James T. Farrell autographs copies of The Silence of History, which has just been published. Silence, Farrell's 29th published book, is the first of 25 volumes in a gagantuan literary project "to paint the panorama of our times." The creator of Studs Lonigan lives and works in a small apartment around the corner from United Nations headquarters. "I had a purpose when I began, and that purpose remains. It was to complete a lifework of books of fiction. I struggle daily, line by line, to achieve my purpose." Farrell will be 59 on February 27th.


    Last edited by Bill Burgess; 09-04-2011 at 04:10 PM.

  2. #202
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    John Murray Tynan

    Born: June 24, 1898, Sheepshead Bay (Brooklyn), NY
    Died: May 16, 1943, NYC, age 44,

    New York sports writer;
    started working part-time for the Brooklyn Eagle in 1918, while still working as a clerk for W.R. Grace & Sons steamship co.
    Brooklyn Eagle sports writer, 1924-26.
    New York Herald-Tribune sports writer, 1926-43. Horse racing writer.

    New York Times' obituary, March 17, 1943, pp. 21.
    Last edited by Bill Burgess; 05-20-2010 at 08:23 PM.

  3. #203
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    John Barret Miley---AKA Jack Miley

    Born: May 28, 1899, Milwaukee, WI
    Died: June 17, 1945, New York, NY, age 46

    Baltimore / Philadelphia / New York sports writer;
    Baltimore American,
    Philadelphia Public Ledger,
    New York Daily News city, sports editor, ? - October, 1937.
    King Features Syndicate
    New York Daily Mirror
    New York Evening Graphic,
    New York Morning Telegraph
    New York Post
    Wife Norma

    New York Herald-Tribune obituary, June 18, 1945.-----------------Sporting News' obituary,----------New York Times' obituary,
    ----------------------------------------------------------------June 21, 1945, pp. 18, column 4.---------June 18, 1945, pp. 19.

    Last edited by Bill Burgess; 08-08-2012 at 01:47 PM.

  4. #204
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    Francis A. Gibbons---AKA Frank Gibbons

    Born: January 29, 1906, Cleveland, OH
    Died: September 1, 1964, Cleveland, OH, age 58---d. cancer, after many months, at Fairview Park Hospital, Cleveland, OH

    Cleveland sports writer;
    Attended Cleveland College
    Cleveland News, 1923
    Cleveland Press, sports writer, 1936 - 1958, columnist, 1958 - 1964.
    WWII; Army Air Corps, Armed Forces Radio Service
    6'4, 235

    Father: James H., born Pennsylvania around 1870; Mother: Mary A. Madden, born Youngstown, OH, around 1876, died March 2, 1956 in Cleveland, OH; Brother: James H., born around 1890, died March 3, 1953, in an automobile accident en route to his mother's funeral, near Hammond, Ind; Wife: Frances M. Klein; Son: Gregory; Daughter: Patricia.

    Authored:
    Bob Feller's Strikeout Story, 1947 (autobiography of Bob Feller), with Frank Gibbons

    Sporting News' obituary, September 12, 1964, pp. 42.------------------------New York Times' obituary, September 3, 1964, pp. 29.


    Cleveland Press' obituary, September 2, 1964.



    Cleveland Press' Obituary, September 2, 1964.
    Frank Gibbons Dies; Press Sports Writer

    Frank Gibbons, The Press sports columnist regarded as one of the best in the nation, died last night in Fairview Park Hospital at the age of 55.

    He had been suffering from cancer for months. Finally he knew it and his friends knew it, and the pain was hard for all. He is survived by his wife, Frances; a son, Gregory, 12, and a daughter, Patricia, 8. Their home is at 2840 Wildflower Dr., Rocky River. Friends may call at Corrigan Funeral Home, 20820 Lorain Rd., Fairview Park tonight and tomorrow. The funeral mass will be in St. Christopher Church in Rocky River, Friday at 11 a. m.

    A writer of nation-wide reputation, Gibbons had been the Press sports columnist since 1958. Before that he covered the Indians. But it wasn't long after Gibby joined The Press, 28 years ago that he became a tremendously popular and colorful figure in the sports and the newspaper worlds. There were many reasons. He was big--gigantic. He was a rollicking story-teller, a man with a quick and side-splitting figure of speech to fit any occasion.

    He had a big smile and a fine, big voice that he loved to use in The Press City Room as well as in the annual Ribs and Roasts baseball writers' show. He had the Irish flair for humor and drama. It was in Tucson last spring that the Big Fellow fell ill and had to come home. He took it big, he took it calm, at least from outward appearances.

    In the weeks that followed Gibby would show up in the Sports Department to write his daily column. It was painful for all his comrades to see that big body of his wasting away, his collars 'too big'. It was gulpy talking with him and trying to keep up the good cheer. Gibby knew this, too, and it got so that he'd slip into the building late in the day so that he wouldn't have to face his well-meaning associates or they to face him.

    There came the time when he could wrestle with the typewriter, the well-turned quip, no longer. It was home and the hospital now. But even then he would keep in touch with the office, calling regularly, talking about the Indians and other sports events. Only last Sunday, he was on the phone charting about the Browns great win over the Lions. And if he was asked how he was feeling Big Frank would fall back on sports jargon to dismiss it: "Look," he'd say, "I know I'm in the last inning . . .

    News of his death brought an immediate reaction from leading sports figures. I knew him only three and a half years, but in that time came to respect him not only as a man, but in my opinion, the leading sports columnist in the nation," said Arthur Modell, Brown's president. Gabe Paul, who is in Washington with the Indians, said, "Gibby was an outstanding writer and a very fine person and I was privileged to know him as well as I did." "One of my very dearest friends. A fine talented man," commented Bill Veeck, from his home in Easton, Md.

    Gibbons, a native Clevelander, was born Jan. 29, 1909. He showed an early interest in sports, indicating the direction his journalistic career would take. He attended St. Ignatius High School and Cleveland College. He attributed his interest in literature to reading as a teen-ager to a blind friend, Martin Ribar. At 17, Gibbons made his debut in Class A sandlot baseball as a catcher with the Cleveland Tractors. The next year he got his first newspaper job in the sports department of the former Cleveland News. He worked briefly for the News and then took off on a nation-wide trip, doing odd jobs and seeing the country.

    He joined The Press in 1936, covering high school sports. From the start Gibbons demonstrated the bright, colorful writing style that was to become familiar to Press readers for almost three decades. In 1937 Gibbons was promoted to writing about the Indians. Gibbons moved onto the Cleveland baseball scene at the start of an exciting era. Bob Feller, the Iowa schoolboy, had just begun a career that was to become one of the most distinguished in the game's history. Later Gibbons was to chronicle it, in collaboration with Feller, in the book "Strikeout Story," one of the best sellers in the history of sports publications at that time.

    Gibbons spent three years in the Army Air Corps, some of the time attached to a special services unit in Europe. He was assigned to the Armed Forces radio network and some of his duties were with the band of the late Glenn Miller. Gibbons treasured the record of a radio interview with Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower, made shortly before the future President left Paris. After the war, Gibbons returned as baseball writer for The Press. In 1946, he recorded one of his many journalistic beats, announcing Bill Veeck's purchase of the Indians, which launched Cleveland post-war baseball boom.

    Gibbons' brilliant writing won national attention and numerous Newspaper Guild awards as the Indians experienced their brightest period, winning pennants in 1948 and 1954.
    Last edited by Bill Burgess; 10-26-2013 at 12:20 PM.

  5. #205
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    Matthew Howard Gallagher---AKA Matt Gallagher

    Born: March 5, 1888, Waco, Texas
    Died: November 9, 1955, Los Angeles, CA, age 67

    Los Angeles sports writer / publicist;
    Pacific Coast League baseball for local newspapers, 1909 - 1931
    Los Angeles Evening Express,
    Los Angeles Herald & Express, credited with discovering Heine Manush, left newspaper work in 1931 for publicity work.

    Associate In charge of Public Relations to David Fleming, President Of Angels in 1938;
    After Pearl Harbor, he volunteered for the USO, and served them till the end of the war.
    Also worked for Pro Bowl, Jr. Rose Bowl, Helms Foundation, yearly Shrine Hospital Prep Football game.

    Los Angeles Times' obituary,
    November 11, 1955, pp. C2.

    -------------------------------Los Angeles Times' obituary, November 10, 1955, pp. C1.------Sporting News' obituary, November 23, 1955, pp. 22.


    L-R: Harry Williams (Pacific Coast L. Sec.), W. R. Bill Schroeder, Matt Gallagher, Paul H. Helms (Helms Athletic Foundation).
    Last edited by Bill Burgess; 08-08-2012 at 03:07 PM.

  6. #206
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    William Harrison Robertson---AKA Sparrow Robertson

    Born: March 4, 1859, Edinburgh, Scotland (Date/Place of Birth confirmed by passport)
    Died: June 8, 1941, Paris, France, age 82, (during Nazi occupation),---d. at home near Fontainebleau of heart malady.
    5'1.

    New York sports writer;
    New York Herald-Tribune; European correspondent (Paris office), known as Paris Herald
    Went to Paris, France duing WWI, became Paris correspondent for New York Herald-Tribune.
    Stayed in Paris after the war.
    sports writer / gossip writer.
    5'1

    February 1, 1935: L-R: Sparrow Robertson, Lou Gehrig, Mrs. Eleanor Gehrig. Lou Gehrig, big shot in American baseball, accompanied by Mrs. Gehrig, are pictured in their Paris hotel. Gehrig was returning home in easy stages after his tour of Japan with the All Star Baseball team.


    New York Times' obituary, June 12, 1941, pp. 24.---------------------------------------Hartford Courant obituary, June 14, 1941, pp. 13.--------------Sporting News' obituary, June 19, 1941, pp. 2.
    Last edited by Bill Burgess; 10-26-2010 at 06:31 PM.

  7. #207
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    John Peter Gallagher---AKA Jack Gallagher

    Born: April 9, 1886, Castletown, Ireland
    Died: April 25, 1946, Chicago, IL, age 60, d. Heart attack, while attending press meeting in Waldorf-Astoria, NYC.

    Chicago sports writer;
    Family moved from Ireland to Philadelphia when he was 5.
    Attended parochial school, De La Salle Academy (Philadelphia, PA),
    Telegraph operator,
    Chicago Tribune, 1911 - 1920
    Los Angeles Times, (Chicago office), IL (1920-46).

    Los Angeles Times' obituary---------------------------Chicago Daily Tribune obituary-------New York Times' obituary
    April 26, 1946, pp. A1.-----------------------------------------April 26, 1946, pp. 18.----------April 26, 1946, pp. 21.

    Last edited by Bill Burgess; 09-11-2011 at 04:05 PM.

  8. #208
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    Albert M. Horowitz---AKA Al Horwits Changed his last name to Horwits because he felt 'Horowitz' sounded too Jewish. Changed it to Horowits first, then Horwits.

    Born: September 20, 1905, Pennsylvania
    Died: February 24, 1984, West Hollywood, CA, age 81

    Philadelphia sports writer;
    Philadelphia Ledger, 1927 - 1941
    Philadelphia Athletics, Publicist, 1942.
    Los Angeles press agent

    Father: Benjamin Kowitz, born Russia around 1871; Mother: Ida Quitka Kowitz, born Russia around 1873. Wife: Clare F., born Pennsylvania around 1909.

    He changed his name from his birth name, Horowitz, because he felt it sounded too Jewish for professional purposes, and might lead to discrimination.

    July 25, 1938: L-R: Carl Hubbell, Joe DiMaggio, Al Horwitz, Connie Mack, Mickey Cochrane.
    At the Philadelphia sports writers' annual banquet, it gave out awards.
    Hubbell was voted Best Pitcher; DiMaggio, MVP; Cochrane, Most Courageous.



    1942: Sports writers, L-R: Red Smith (Philadelphia Record), Irving Lisager (Chicago News), Howard Roberts (Chicago News),
    Al Horowitz (Philadelphia Record), Frank Yeutter (Philadelphia Bulletin), Samuel Goldwyn (MGM movie studio),
    Herb Simons (Chicago Times), Babe Ruth, Gary Cooper (actor), Stan Baumgartner (Philadelphia Inquirer), Christy Walsh.
    Kneeling: Herb Schulte (Chicago News), Jimmy Corcoran (Chicago Herald American).
    Last edited by Bill Burgess; 10-26-2013 at 12:02 PM.

  9. #209
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    Lawrence Spencer Holst---AKA Doc Holst

    Born: August 26, 1898, Toledo, OH
    Died: April 20, 1971, Toledo, OH, age 72---d. Maumee Valley Hospital, Toledo, OH

    Detroit / Toledo / Cleveland sports writer;
    El Paso Herald,
    Toledo Times, 1917 - 1930
    Detroit Free Press, (7 years)
    Toledo News-Bee
    Toledo Blade
    Cleveland News
    Detroit Times, (13 years)
    Flint Journal, (7 years)
    New York Mirror
    King Features
    Hearst Sunday Features
    Toledo Times, 1945 - April, 1967

    -----------------------------------------The Toledo Blade (OH) obituary, April 21, 1971, pp. 24.

    Sporting News' obituary, May 8, 1971, pp. 38.


    October 6, 1940.
    Last edited by Bill Burgess; 08-08-2012 at 04:24 PM.

  10. #210
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    John Francis Kieran

    Born: August 2, 1892, Bronx, NY
    Died: December 10, 1981, Rockport, MA, age 89

    New York sports writer;
    New York Times, sports reporter, 1914 - 1917, 1919 - 1922
    New York Tribune, Baseball writer, 1922 - 1925
    New York American, columnist, 1925 - 1926
    New York Times, sports columnist, 1927 - December, 1941
    New York Sun, nature columnist, December, 1941 - 1945.
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    John F. Kieran, Warren Brown, and John Drebinger were the recipients of the 1973 J.G. Taylor Spink Award.

    John Francis Kieran was a former City College of New York and Fordham University shortstop. The son of the president of Hunter College, Kieran covered baseball from 1922 to 1927 for the New York Times. His "Sports of the Times" column was the first bylined in the Times.

    Kieran's interests were varied and extensive. An accomplished ornithologist and naturalist, Kieran was head of the National Audubon Society for a number of years. While on the road covering ball games, he would regularly spend mornings visiting museums, zoos, parks, libraries, or reading classics of literature.

    Kieran later gained fame as the jug-eared, wide-eyed star of "Information Please," a national radio and television question-and-answer program. It was in this role that Kieran showed that sportswriters' knowledge was not simply confined to the press box and clubhouse. A fountain of information, Kieran wrote books on a variety of different subjects.
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Biography Resource Center:
    John Kieran was affectionately known as America's "walking encyclopedia." A noted journalist--and first author of the "Sports of the Times" column in the New York Times --Kieran made use of his wide-ranging knowledge on the popular radio show Information, Please. His radio work made him famous beyond the bounds of sports-writing and helped to create an audience for the numerous books on natural history he wrote later in life. "At the popular level Kieran enjoyed a national reputation not only as an authority on sports but also as the man who knew something about almost everything. . . . ," noted William Curran in the Dictionary of Literary Biography. "His explanation for the extraordinary breadth of knowledge was simple: `I read a lot and I am interested in many things.'"

    A native of the Bronx, Kieran began working at the New York Times in 1914, after serving as a gentleman farmer and a civil engineer. He stayed at the Times continuously between 1927 and 1941 after having been offered the newspaper's first by-lined sports column, "Sports of the Times." Enormously erudite with a keen sense of humor, Kieran was known to lace his columns with mock sonnets and learned references that introduced a new sophistication into sports-writing. Curran observed: "For all the playful interjection of classical references and literary allusions, Kieran's prose offered a refreshing change from the baroque excesses and blizzard of clichés that marked much of American sports-writing even as late as the 1930s. Long before Kieran had taken up the considerable challenge of writing a daily column in the country's most prestigious daily newspaper, he had arrived at a plain, clear, and easy manner of reporting, a style that won him ardent readers."

    In 1938 Kieran was asked to join a panel of "experts" for a radio game show called Information, Please. Listeners were invited to submit questions in an effort to stump the panel, which also included Franklin P. Adams, Oscar Levant, and moderator Clifton Fadiman. Topics included everything from sports and current events to such esoteric fields as botany, archeology, law, ecology, and language. "Kieran answered correctly thousands of questions submitted by listeners to Information, Please," Curran noted. ". . . There seemed to be no field to which he was a stranger, and he became a national celebrity."

    America's "walking encyclopedia" left the New York Times in 1941 and accepted a position as a natural history columnist for the New York Sun. This job change marked a significant turning point in Kieran's life. Long interested in the natural world, he devoted the rest of his career to writing about the nation's flora and fauna, publishing no less than nine titles on nature themes. In a review of Footnotes on Nature, Commonweal correspondent Alan Devoe wrote: "John Kieran shows himself a real naturalist, in the best sense: a man with a deep, intelligent and lifelong devotion to the wonder of the natural world, and a man who knows how to write about his nature adventures with a winning enthusiasm." In the New York Times, R. G. Davis concluded: "`Footnotes on Nature' is a genuine act of love, and like all the best books of its kind, it gives the reader a very exciting impulse to go out and take for himself these pleasures which are so near, so costless and so inexhaustibly rich."

    Kieran must have surprised the citizens of Manhattan when he published A Natural History of New York City in 1960. Odd as it may sound, the book explored the fantastic variety of wildlife found in the city, from butterflies and flowers to migratory waterfowl in the region's tidal estuaries. New York Times Book Review contributor E. W. Teale cited the work for its "exact and often surprising information," adding: "The volume is one long delightful trip in the company of a charming and erudite companion. . . . [The book] is John Kieran's finest work, in many ways the best treatment the natural history of a great city has ever received."

    From 1952 until his death in 1981, Kieran lived quietly in Rockport, Massachusetts. His memoir, Not Under Oath: Recollections and Reflections, was published in 1964. "`Information, Please' has passed into the realm of pleasant memories," wrote Saturday Review correspondent R. L. Perkin, "but the man with the Spitzenburg voice . . . has brightened and warmed the fall book season with a most delightful memoir. Not Under Oath has the richness, the color, and the zest of autumn weather, and it explains why so many men and women love John Kieran." The man who Curran called "perhaps the best and most literate sportswriter of his generation" died in Rockport at the age of 89, having inaugurated a nationally-recognized newspaper column that continues to this day.

    PERSONAL INFORMATION: Surname is pronounced Keer-un; born August 2, 1892, in New York, NY; died December 10, 1981, in Rockport, MA; son of James Michael (an educator and administrator) and Kate (a teacher and musician; maiden name, Donahue) Kieran; married Alma Boldtmann, May 14, 1919 (died June, 1944); married Margaret Ford (a journalist), September 5, 1947; children: (first marriage) James Michael, John Francis, Beatrice. Education: Attended College of the City of New York (now City College of the City University of New York), 1908-11; Fordham University, B.S. (cum laude), 1912; Clarkson College of Technology, D.Sc., 1941; Wesleyan University, M.A., 1942. Military/Wartime Service: Served with the 11th Engineers of the American Expeditionary Forces during World War I.

    AWARDS: Burroughs Medal, John Burroughs Memorial Association, 1960, for recognition of an outstanding book on natural science.

    CAREER: Held a variety of jobs during his early career, including teaching in a country school in Dutchess County, NY, running a poultry business, and working as a timekeeper for a sewer construction project; New York Times, sports writer, 1914-17, 1919-22; New York Tribune, baseball writer, 1922-25; New York American, columnist, 1925-26; New York Times, columnist, 1927-41; New York Sun, columnist, 1941-44; freelance writer, 1944-81. Elector, Hall of Fame for Great Americans, beginning 1945; member of the board of experts on radio program, Information, Please, 1938-48.

    WRITINGS:
    The Story of the Olympic Games: 776 B.C.-1936 A.D., Frederick A. Stokes (New York, NY), 1936, revised editions (with Arthur Daley) published quadrennially, Lippincott (Philadelphia, PA), 1948-77.
    The American Sporting Scene, illustrations by Joseph W. Golinkin, Macmillan (New York, NY), 1941.
    Not Under Oath: Recollections and Reflections, Houghton, 1964.

    Contributor of articles to periodicals, including Saturday Evening Post, Woman's Home Companion, American Magazine, Literary Digest, Collier's, and Audubon Magazine.

    New York Times' obituary, December 11, 1981, pp. D19.--------------------------------------------Biographical Dictionary of American Sports,
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Outdoors, Communications Media, 1988.


    No Cheering in The Press Box
    by Jermone Holtzman, 1995, pp. 34-35.-----------------------Sporting News, December 26, 1981.


    Information Please panel: L-R: Oscar Levant, John Kieran, Cedric Hardwicke, Franklin P. Adams.


    -------------------------------------------------------------------------Moe Berg/John Kieran: 1935
    Last edited by Bill Burgess; 09-11-2011 at 05:55 PM.

  11. #211
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    Marshall Allen Hunt

    Born: December 1, 1895, Indianapolis, IN
    Died: September 17, 1974, Olympia, WA, age 78

    New York sports writer;
    Enlisted WWI, 1917 - 1918
    New York Daily News, sports editor, 1918 - 1939
    Left New York City, 1939 for Olympia, WA
    Olympia Daily (WA) Olympian sports editor, 1939 - 1961
    Was always considered the closest scribe pal of Babe Ruth.

    Sporting News' obituary, October 12, 1974, pp. 38.
    Last edited by Bill Burgess; 10-19-2013 at 02:10 PM.

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    James Lawrence Kilgallen---AKA Jim Kilgallen

    Born: July 11, 1888, Pittston, PA
    Died: December 21, 1982, New York City, NY, age 94

    New York sports writer;
    Started as telegrapher for Chicago Daily Farmers & Drovers Journal, when he was 15.
    Worked for Chicago Tribune on the side.
    Associated Press,
    United Press,
    Daily Bommerang (Laramie, Wyo.) just before WWI.
    International News Service, 1920 - 1958
    Hearst Headline Service, 1958 - 1980, NY

    One of his daughters, Dorothy Kilgallen, was a well-known newpaper columnist who died November 8, 1965. One of her main claims to fame was she became a regular panelist on the TV game show, What's My Line in 1950 and stayed on the show until her death.

    New York Times' obituary, December 23, 1982, pp. D15.-----------------------------------------------------------1928


    June 7, 1944, Rome, Italy: James Kilgallen receives rosary and photo from Pope Pius 12, after
    Rome is liberated by the Allies from the Germans / Italians Axis' forces.
    Last edited by Bill Burgess; 08-09-2012 at 01:05 PM.

  13. #213
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    Raymond John Kelly

    Born: February 18, 1898, New York City, NY
    Died: January 8, 1967, Bronxville, NY, age 68,---d. heart attack at home.

    New York sports writer / sports editor;
    Graduated Fordham University (Bronx, NY),
    New York Tribune, sports dept., 1920 - 1921
    New York Times Assistant sports editor, 1923 - 1937, sports editor, February 26, 1937 - April, 1957

    ---New York Times' obituary, January 9, 1967, pp. 39, column 3.---Sporting News' obituary, January 21, 1967, pp. 34.
    Last edited by Bill Burgess; 08-09-2012 at 01:47 PM.

  14. #214
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    Albert William Keane---AKA Bert Keane

    Born: January 22, 1888, Danielson, Conn.
    Died: July 11, 1939, Hartford, Conn., age 51

    New Bedford Times, city news reporter, sports editor, 1907 - 1919
    Waterbury Republican
    Los Angeles Herald, copy desk, 1 year
    Springfield Union, night city editor, 1920-22, sports editor, 1921-26,
    Hartford Courant, sports editor, 1926 - 1939.

    Wife: Elizabeth Mae Burt;

    Hartford Courant obituary, July 12, 1939, pp. 1.


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Sporting News' obituary, July 20, 1939, pp. 5.
    Last edited by Bill Burgess; 10-19-2013 at 09:42 AM.

  15. #215
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    Samuel Harold Lacy---AKA Sam Lacy

    Born: October 23, 1903, Mystic, CT
    Died: May 8, 2003, Washington, DC, age 99

    Washington/Baltimore sports writer;
    His mother was Shinnecock Indian;
    Grew up Washington DC, 5 blocks from Griffith stadium,
    Graduated Howard University (Washington, DC), bachelor's in physical education, 1923
    Devoted his early life to lobbying for integration of major league baseball & society.
    Washington Tribune: part-time sports writer, reporter, 1918 - 1920, 1923- 1930), managing editor, sports writer, 1930-1934), sports editor, columnist, 1934-1939.
    Baltimore Afro-American sports writer, columnist, 1939-1940, sports editor, columnist, 1943 - ?,
    Chicago Defender associate national editor, 1940-1943
    1st Black in the Baseball Writers Association, 1948,
    Taylor Spink Award (Baseball Hall of Fame, 1997),
    Personally knew many black stars, (Joe Louis, Jesse Owens, Arthur Ashe), but never shirked from criticizing them if he felt warranted. Mentor: father
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Sam Lacy, recognized as a pioneer in baseball journalism in becoming one of the first African-American members of the Baseball Writers' Association of America, was the 1997 recipient of the J.G. Taylor Spink Award. Lacy's career in print journalism began in the 1920s, working as a sportswriter at the Washington Tribune under the tutelage of editor Lewis Lautier. He was both managing editor and sports editor of the paper from 1934-39, before moving to Chicago to become assistant national editor for the Chicago Defender from 1940-43. He then returned to his roots in Baltimore to become a columnist and sports editor for the weekly Baltimore Afro-American, where he remained for well over half a century. He authored the widely popular column "A to Z" for many years.

    His illustrious career as a sports journalist has spanned 17 presidential elections, but it was as a crusader in the 1930s and 1940s, when Lacy's columns were devoted to desegregating baseball in the major leagues, that he made his greatest impact as a journalist.
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Sam Lacy is a sports columnist for the Baltimore Afro-American. He grew up in Washington only a few blocks from Griffith Stadium. As a youngster, he shagged fly balls for Washington Senator players and ran errands for them. Lacy was a semi-pro pitcher who dreamed of playing in the Negro Leagues and played against many of the great black players of the 1920s and 1930s. Not good enough to play in the Negro Leagues, Lacy became a sportswriter with the local black newspaper, the Washington Tribune. In 1933, he began a 14-year crusade to integrate major league baseball. In December 1937, Lacy landed a groundbreaking interview with Senators owner Clark Griffith, who declared that the "time was not far off" when black players would play in the major leagues. Lacy, along with Pittsburgh Courier sports columnist Wendell Smith, made Griffith's Senators one of the focal points of their integration efforts. Ultimately, however, Lacy and Smith had more success in Brooklyn, where they became Jackie Robinson's friends and confidantes. Lacy, who is in his late 90s, still lives in Northeast Washington
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    May 27, 1984: L-R: NAACP Executive Director Benjamin L. Hooks, Sam Lacy, former
    NBA star Sam Jones, Hank Aaron, NBA Oscar Robertson, NAACP headquarters, after naming
    them to a sports advisory committee formed to improve minority hiring practices among
    major sports franchises.



    New York Times obituary, May 12, 2003, pp. B7.


    Sporting News' obituary, May 26, 2003, pp. 62.


    Last edited by Bill Burgess; 09-11-2011 at 07:54 PM.

  16. #216
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    Albert Gillis Laney---AKA Al Laney

    Born: January 11, 1896, Pensacola, FL
    Died: January 31, 1988, Spring Valley, NY, age 92

    New York sports writer;
    Pensacola Journal (Pensacola, FL),
    Dallas Dispatch reporter,
    Minneapolis News reporter,
    New York Evening Mail, 1920 - 1925
    Paris Herald (European edition of New York Herald-Tribune, 1925 - 1934
    New York Herald-Tribune reporter and columnist, 1934 - 1966

    International Tennis Hall of Fame · Home to the Legends of Tennis - Newport, RI
    A fine writer who made his name covering sports, Albert Gillis Laney was usually associated with tennis and golf, but he covered everything on the menu, from big league baseball to football to championship fights, with his usual understanding of what was at foot, and a keen reportorial touch. Laconic, mustachioed, usually beneath a gray fedora, he settled in Paris for a time after World War I, worked for James Joyce as secretary, and joined the staff of the renowned "Paris Herald" (now the "International Herald Tribune").

    He had an eye for compelling features, and his coverage of the epic 1926 showdown of Suzanne Lenglen and Helen Wills at Cannes graces several anthologies. He spanned the generations, having observed another epic, the Maurice McLoughlin-Norman Brookes Davis Cup duel at Forest Hills in 1914, and worked as a reporter until his last newspaper, the "New York Herald Tribune", folded in 1966. That paper had a legendary sports staff headed by Stanley Woodward, who felt Laney's story on blind, down-and-out Sam Langford, onetime great boxer, was an American masterpiece.

    His "Courting the Game", a tennis memoir, remains one of the splendid tennis books. Laney was born January 11, 1895, in Pensacola, FL, retained a Southern lilt in his speech, and died January 31, 1988, in Spring Valley, NY. He entered the Hall of Fame in 1979.
    -------------------------------------------------
    Al Laney (Sportswriter. Born, Pensacola, Fla., Jan. 11, 1896; died, Spring Valley, N.Y., Jan. 31, 1988.) Starting with the Pensacola Journal in his birthplace, Albert Gillies Laney moved to newspapers in Dallas, Tex., amd Minneapolis, Minn., before joining the U.S. Army during World War I. After two years in the service, Laney mustered out in 1919 and went to New York. He started with the Evening Mail in 1920, switched into sports, and, when his paper was sold to the Telegram in 1925, went to Paris for the new Herald Tribune. Writing for both the European and New York editions, he covered tennis, golf, and other sports. Laney was to cover every Wimbledon championship from 1925 to 1939. With the onset of World War II in Europe, he returned to New York. For 25 years (1940-65), Laney was a fixture at Forest Hills for the U.S. national tennis championships. He also became a regular on the hockey beat, covering at first the Americans and then the Rangers at the Garden. After the Herald Tribune closed in April 1966, Laney was with the World Journal Tribune until it, too, folded May 5, 1967. He was a versatile writer who not only covered tennis, golf, and hockey but also baseball and college football, all of which he wrote with elan. (The Bill Shannon Biographical Dictionary of New York Sports is an open database of sports biographies maintained by Jordan Sprechman and Marty Appel. )

    No Cheering In The Pressbox, by Jerome Holtzman, 1974, pp. 81-82.--New York Times' obituary, February 3, 1988, pp. B6.
    Last edited by Bill Burgess; 11-12-2011 at 05:21 PM.

  17. #217
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    Havey Joseph Boyle

    Born: December 12, 1892, Pittsburgh, PA
    Died: March 18, 1947, Pittsburgh, PA, age 54,---d. heart ailment and asthma at St. Joseph's Hospital in Pittsburgh.

    Pittsburgh sports writer;
    Pittsburgh Hill Top Record, 1913 - ?
    Pittsburgh Tri-State News Service,
    Pittsburgh Chronicle Telegraph, 1916 - 27
    Pittsburgh Sun Telegraph, 1927 - 29
    Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, sports editor, 1929 - 47, death.
    His writing style was scholarly blended with Irish wit.

    Wife: May Williams Boyle, born around 1893, died August 29, 1960.

    Sporting News' obituary, March 26, 1947.----------------------------------New York Times' obituary, March 19, 1947, pp. 25.

    Last edited by Bill Burgess; 11-17-2011 at 11:22 AM.

  18. #218
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    ----------
    Last edited by Bill Burgess; 01-28-2009 at 01:25 PM.

  19. #219
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    William Sylvestor Hennigan---AKA Willie Hennigan

    Born: February 5, 1890, Brooklyn, NY
    Died: July 5, 1942, Richmond Hills, NY, age 52,---d. apoplexy

    New York sports writer;
    New York World, office boy, 1905 - 1910; made editor by 1910, sporting staff, 1912 - 1918
    New York World, reporter, June 5, 1917 (WWI Civilian Draft Registration) - 1928? at least
    New York American, 1918 - 1920
    New York World, 1920 - 1931
    New York Graphic, 1931 - 1939
    New York Yankees' PR manager, 1939 - 1942, death.
    New York Mirror composing room, 1941 - 1942, death.

    Wife: Mary T., born New York around 1895, died February 18, 1962, Elmhurst, NY.

    New York Times' obituary, July 6, 1942, pp. 15.
    Last edited by Bill Burgess; 05-10-2012 at 05:45 PM.

  20. #220
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    William John Hennigan, Sr.---AKA Jack Hennigan

    Born: September 28, 1918, Brooklyn, NY
    Died: September 5, 1971, Rosedale (Queens), NY, age 53,---d. Sunday in Jamaica Hospital (NY) after a short illness.

    New York sports writer;
    New York Mirror, sports writer/reporter, copy editor, rewrite man,
    Long Island Star, sports writer
    New York Morning Telegraph (a horse racing publication), copy editor

    Wife: Florence, born April 12, 1922, Brooklyn, NY, died December 13, 1995, Jamaica, NY; Son: William John, Jr., born Brooklyn, NY, April 8, 1950; Son: John, born Queens, August 12, 1957; Daughter: Joan Marie, born Queens, May 23, 1959.

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------New York Times' obituary ---------------------------Sporting News' obituary,
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------September 7, 1971, pp. 42.----------------------October 9, 1971, pp. 35
    .
    Last edited by Bill Burgess; 05-11-2012 at 07:07 AM.

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