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Thread: Female Ump to Work MLB Exhibition Game

  1. #41
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    I'm pretty sure the NBA has female officials

  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by catbox_9 View Post
    I'm pretty sure the NBA has female officials
    Violet Palmer #12

    NBA experience: Nine seasons, currently in her 10th NBA season
    Born: July 20, 1964 (Lynwood, CA)
    Resides: Los Angeles, CA
    HS: Compton (Compton, CA)
    College: Cal Poly Pomona '87

    - Only woman official in the NBA
    - Officiated 500 regular season games and one playoff game.
    - Only current active female official in the NBA and one of only two women (along with Dee Kanter) to officiate regular season games in one of the four major sports (NBA, NFL, MLB and NHL).

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by TyrusRaymondCobb View Post
    Sandra de Jenken was the chair umpire for this year's Australian Open (tennis) Mens Singles Final. Female chairs are quite prevalent in professional tennis.
    Interesting. I've only noticed the mail chair umpires (of which John McEnroe was more than willing to impart his opinion to) in the men's singles. Any women chair umps in the women's singles of other major tennis games, such as Wimbledon, US Open, etc?

    I don't follow the WNBA, but if there are any there, I wouldn't mind hearing of this, or even if it's college basketball, baseball, etc.
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  4. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by NotAboutEgo View Post
    Interesting. That's one sport out of how many?
    There are a few women soccer referees who officiate the mens game at the highest level, and one or two top women rugby refs have worked top level mens competition recently. Many sports seem to be changing.

    Seems like given the limited number of good umps we'd better look at the "other" 50% of the population.
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  5. #45
    Quote Originally Posted by Mattingly View Post
    Interesting. I've only noticed the mail chair umpires (of which John McEnroe was more than willing to impart his opinion to) in the men's singles. Any women chair umps in the women's singles of other major tennis games, such as Wimbledon, US Open, etc?
    Gerry Armstrong was the chair who announced the default in 1990 (4th Rd Australian Open McEnroe v Pernfors). 3rd code violation (McEnroe said something totally disgusting to the Grand Slam Supervisor, Ken Farrar (1 step below tournament referee), which I will not repeat here), but even as an isolated incident it would have been enough to get him thrown out.

    Code Violations committed by McEnroe that match:
    1st Code - Unsportsmanlike Behaviour (intimidating stare at female line judge (who also does GS matches in the chair) while bouncing the ball on the strings of his racquet
    2nd Code - Racquet Abuse (cracked the racquet. In those days, a cracked racquet was as bad as a broken one, and pretty much was an automatic Code)
    3rd Code - Audible Obscenity (as described above)
    The Code of Conduct was changed before the Open to be a 3 strikes policy, rather than a 4 strikes policy. It has been somewhat modified nowadays, but not in reaction to the McEnroe incident

    Types of Code of Conduct Violations:
    1. Withdrawal from Tournament
    2. Commencement of Play
    3. Dress and Equipment
    4. Physical Abuse
    5. Verbal Abuse
    6. Unsportsmanlike conduct
    7. Unreasonable delays
    8. Audible Obscenity
    9. Visible Obscenity
    10. Abuse of Racquets or Equipment
    11. Abuse of Balls
    12. Leaving the Court
    13. Rest Period
    14. Best Efforts
    15. Coaching
    16. Spectator Interference

    Chair Umpires do not have the power to default players in 99.995% of cases. They would get the Tournament Referee or Supervisor (if there is one) and explain the situation, who would then make a decision (that's why they get more money!).

    Uually only Gold Badges work the higher rounds of the Grand Slams (Semis & Finals) for singles. There are 12 Gold Badges with full time contracts from the ITF (International Tennis Federation). There are other Gold Badges as well, but maybe only half-a-dozen. To earn one takes a LOT of extremely hard work and willingness to travel globally. Most of the higher level officials do not have a family life from what I have observed, and one or two bad enough mistakes may see you stripped of your badge.

    The hierarchy of ITF badges:
    Gold
    Silver
    Bronze
    White

    White Badges have to be recommended by their National Association from the ranks of the unbadged officials (Chair Umpires & Referees). They then go to a Level 2 school, where they are placed in match situations, and have to pass an examination (pass mark is more than 80%, I think).

    White badges take the same route to earning their Bronze badge, but along the way are assessed by Silver and Gold badge Chairs/Referees. They then go to a Level 3 school, where they are placed in match situations, and have to pass an examination (pass mark is more than 80%, I think).

    Any progress beyond Bronze is marked on various things of which I have no idea. Level 3 is the highest Level school that the ITF runs.

    The vast majority of officials do not have badges. They are the ones who you usually see calling the lines.

    To get back to your question, though, there is no barrier to men umpiring women or vice versa.

    Hopefully this provides a small insight into a different sport ...

  6. #46
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    Ria Cortesio


    It looks like I may be a little late to this discussion, but I wanted to speak up on what I have seen from this umpire.

    I have watched Ria for three seasons in the AA Southern League, and she compares favorably to most of the other umps. She seems to have stronger aspects of her game, getting a good look at the plays and making quick calls.


    As an umpire she is just about par for the course or a little better. She took a fair amount of disrespect in her first couple seasons at this level, but seems to have overcome most of that kind of thing in the past year and a half or so.

    There are certainly umpires in the southern league who are worse!


    Here she is in action as crew chief
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GA8thZWDWQs

  7. #47
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    ehh...

    what exactly did she do that was so great in this video? The decision had already been made. Why would you argue with an ejected coach? She just stood there for less than a minute till he finally left and the game resumed shortly after.

    Now if that was a video of her making the call and the coach arguing with her... total different story. She really had nothing to do with this at all.

  8. #48
    NotAboutEgo Guest
    Seeing how MLB umps have really sucked it up lately (for quite a while, actually), most ten year olds could do the job better than most MLB umps. It's not that hard calling pitches behind the plate, yet they make some really assanine calls so they can show their control and authority. This is making MLB go downhill really fast and is cheapening the game.

    Getting back to Ria and any other female umps, people need to focus on their skills and how well they call a game... rather than focusing on the fact that they are females in a male dominated world fighting ignorant and unnecessary stereotypes. Who cares if an ump is a female or a male, as long as they call a good game and are fair to both sides?

    Let's focus on what's important rather than focusing on ignorance.

    P.S. This post is not a comment to the previous two posts; rather, it's my opinion.

  9. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by JeepingBaseball View Post
    ehh...

    what exactly did she do that was so great in this video? The decision had already been made. Why would you argue with an ejected coach? She just stood there for less than a minute till he finally left and the game resumed shortly after.

    Now if that was a video of her making the call and the coach arguing with her... total different story. She really had nothing to do with this at all.



    If you read my post you would have seen that I never claimed anyones greatness, just a chance to see a minor league umpire honing their craft.

    Since most folks have only seen Cortesio on one MLB exhibition game, I thought my vid would be a good way to get another look. Sorry I dont have a video of her reaction to an angry manager leaving a frying pan on homeplate for ya, but I wasnt at that game!



    Ria is the crewchief, and in the altercation between the 1b ump and an ejected manager in the vid, I thought she handled it like a pro. Especially when one considers the fact that the 1b umpire completely blew the call on a ball hit down the line (chalk flew when the ball landed, but was called foul).

    This umpire had missed calls during the series already, and both managers ended up being ejected during the series.

    So what we are seeing here is a crew chief letting a manager have their say about a mistake without it escalating into a problem, and preventing contact. In that situation, there isnt much more that can be asked of an umpire, no matter who they are or what level of play it is.

  10. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by DriftersGM View Post
    Ria is the crewchief, and in the altercation between the 1b ump and an ejected manager in the vid, I thought she handled it like a pro. Especially when one considers the fact that the 1b umpire completely blew the call on a ball hit down the line (chalk flew when the ball landed, but was called foul).

    This umpire had missed calls during the series already, and both managers ended up being ejected during the series.

    So what we are seeing here is a crew chief letting a manager have their say about a mistake without it escalating into a problem, and preventing contact. In that situation, there isnt much more that can be asked of an umpire, no matter who they are or what level of play it is.
    Nice post - thanks for the insight.

  11. #51
    NotAboutEgo Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by DriftersGM View Post
    If you read my post you would have seen that I never claimed anyones greatness, just a chance to see a minor league umpire honing their craft.

    Since most folks have only seen Cortesio on one MLB exhibition game, I thought my vid would be a good way to get another look. Sorry I dont have a video of her reaction to an angry manager leaving a frying pan on homeplate for ya, but I wasnt at that game!



    Ria is the crewchief, and in the altercation between the 1b ump and an ejected manager in the vid, I thought she handled it like a pro. Especially when one considers the fact that the 1b umpire completely blew the call on a ball hit down the line (chalk flew when the ball landed, but was called foul).

    This umpire had missed calls during the series already, and both managers ended up being ejected during the series.

    So what we are seeing here is a crew chief letting a manager have their say about a mistake without it escalating into a problem, and preventing contact. In that situation, there isnt much more that can be asked of an umpire, no matter who they are or what level of play it is.
    Thanks for focusing on the quality of the umpire (the quality of Cortesio's skills and knowledge of her job and how she handles herself in disagreements) rather than on the fact that she is female umpiring baseball. It's great to see umpires umpiring out of the love of the game and with understanding rather than out of whatever superficial sense of security and power they receive out of umpiring with insincerity.

  12. #52
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    Cortesio was released by MLB.

    Any info given? Any inside info?

    Is this release normal for minor league umps?

    Is it normal to ump at Double-A for five years?

  13. #53
    NotAboutEgo Guest
    I found this story while doing a search on Google...

    http://msn.foxsports.com/mlb/story/7396468


    Cortesio released by minor leagues
    Associated Press, Updated 20 hours ago

    Ria Cortesio, pro baseball's only female umpire, was released by the minor leagues this week. Earlier this season, she became the first woman in nearly 20 years to call a major league exhibition game.

    "I've been prepared for it, to some extent, for a long time," she told The Associated Press on Wednesday from her home in western Illinois. "But I was surprised a little bit."
    Cortesio spent nine years in the minors, the last five in the Double-A Southern League, and hoped someday to become the first female ump in the majors. In March, she worked a spring training game between the Chicago Cubs and Arizona Diamondbacks.

    Her mask made it to the Hall of Fame. She handled the Futures Game and Home Run Derby at the All-Star game in Pittsburgh last year. She once was called out by George Steinbrenner for squeezing the strike zone when Roger Clemens made a rehab start.

    Cortesio cut her ponytail several years ago and lowered her voice for making calls, trying to be more inconspicuous. At 5-foot-10, she was slender — Prince Fielder once gently lifted her out of the way so he could charge the mound.

    She was at her offseason job, helping run the music system at the arena where the Quad City Flames of the American Hockey League play, when she got a call Tuesday from minor league baseball's umpire organization.

    "They let you know around the World Series about next year. If they want to keep you, they send a letter. If they're going to let you go, they call," she said. "When I saw the number on my cell phone, I thought, 'Whoa, this is it."'

    There are about 300 umpires in the majors and affiliated minors. Several minor league umps get released each offseason, with baseball trying to make a decision on their futures within a few years.

    At 31, Cortesio wants to map out what's next. Her family runs a wine business and she's been a substitute teacher in high school. When she went to Rice University, she worked the scoreboard at the Astrodome.

    "It does feel freeing, in a way," she said. As she spoke, she said she was putting on her Joan Jett-style makeup to go to work on Halloween night.

    There have been six female umpires in the affiliated minor leagues, and none have made the majors. Pam Postema spent several years in Triple-A during the 1980s; after being fired, she filed a sex discrimination suit against baseball and settled out of court 5 1/2 years later.

    Cortesio said she had not decided whether to pursue legal action.

    Her release came in a call from Mike Fitzpatrick, executive director of the Professional Baseball Umpire Corporation. He did not immediately return a call for comment.

    Cortesio started this season as the top-ranked umpire in all of Double-A. If there had been an opening in Triple-A, it would've been hers.

    There were no vacancies and when the new ratings by minor league supervisors came out in midseason, her ranking substantially dropped. So, too, did her chance of getting a promotion and possibly making it to the majors someday.

    A move up would have greatly changed her status - umpires in Triple-A are under the auspices of major league supervisors.

    "I don't know if they wanted to make a call on me in the majors," she said.

    Cortesio started out in the rookie Pioneer League in 1999 and later worked in the Midwest and Florida State leagues. She was an instructor at the Jim Evans Academy of Professional Umpiring.

    As a crew chief in the Southern League, she made about $2,700 per month. Her three-person crew drove an average of 24,000 miles during the six-month season.

  14. #54
    NotAboutEgo Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by bkmckenna View Post
    Cortesio was released by MLB.

    Any info given? Any inside info?

    Is this release normal for minor league umps?

    Is it normal to ump at Double-A for five years?
    That's what I'm wondering. It seems kind of strange since she was rated as one of the top Minor League umpires. It also seems strange since she has a lot of seniority.

  15. #55
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    I don't really know anything about her specific case but five years at AA does seem like a long time for someone looking to bounce up. Which just suggests that a diecision had to be made one way or the other.

    What is also strange (if it is accurate) is how someone could be the top umpire at the start of a season and fall that fast w/o some good reason or at least a hint as to why.

    She may very well have run her course so I can't say that organized baseball stacked the deck against her, but it sure would have been nice to see her on a ML field.

  16. #56
    NotAboutEgo Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by bkmckenna View Post
    I don't really know anything about her specific case but five years at AA does seem like a long time for someone looking to bounce up. Which just suggests that a diecision had to be made one way or the other.

    What is also strange (if it is accurate) is how someone could be the top umpire at the start of a season and fall that fast w/o some good reason or at least a hint as to why.

    She may very well have run her course so I can't say that organized baseball stacked the deck against her, but it sure would have been nice to see her on a ML field.
    I would have liked to have seen her as well. Are you familair with what happened to Pam Postema?

  17. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by NotAboutEgo View Post
    I would have liked to have seen her as well. Are you familair with what happened to Pam Postema?
    Yes, I included her in my book actually.

    One overlooked period in baseball history is how Bart Giamatti stood in the way of Postema and Dave Pallone. In fact, the internet is filled with Giammati as some sort of savior here.
    Last edited by Brian McKenna; 11-01-2007 at 03:46 PM.

  18. #58
    NotAboutEgo Guest
    It does seem that Giamatti is seen as a hero. What are the details about how he was in the way of Postema and the other guy?

  19. #59
    I am surprised at how quiet Cortesio's release has been. After hearing so much about her, reading that she was released came as quite a surprise to me.Something must have happened. You don't go from the penthouse to the outhouse that quickly.

  20. #60
    Quote Originally Posted by tonypug View Post
    Something must have happened.
    Yeah, she was born a woman.

    Maybe there's more to the story than what we know. She seemed like a good umpire. She was good enough to hang around as long as she did. Surely she was better than some of the other crap we see on the ML field. I'd take her over CB Bucknor any day. That guy is useless. And that other ump, what was his name? The guy that got suspended at the end of last season?

    Yeah, we really need to keep the women off the field...
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