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Thread: youth glove size?

  1. #1

    youth glove size?

    What size glove would you recommend for a 7 year old that is average in size about 4'2" 58 lbs? He currently is using a 9.5" t-ball glove rated for 3-5 year olds that he catches well with. His rec team coach made a blanket statement that team member gloves should be 10.5" or larger.
    It seems silly to see some of the shovel type gloves being used like opening a garbage bag and hoping it falls in. However, maybe he does need one that is a bit bigger? Any suggestions?
    Last edited by joeR; 02-20-2008 at 09:02 PM.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by joeR View Post
    What size glove would you recommend for a 7 year old that is average in size about 4'2" 58 lbs? He currently is using a 9.5" t-ball glove rated for 3-5 year olds that he catches well with. His rec team coach made a blanket statement that team member gloves should be 10.5" or larger.
    It seems silly to see some of the shovel type gloves being used like opening a garbage bag and hoping it falls in. However, maybe he does need one that is a bit bigger? Any suggestions?
    A 10.5 glove would be perfect. A smaller glove can help him develop better hands. He should be able to stick with that until he is 10 years old.

    Middle Infielders all the way up to MLB/Pro use a 11.25 glove. 3rd base might go with an 11.75, while outfielders go with the biggest glove that is legal and doesn't serve as an air brake.

  3. #3
    Well, I would say that the best glove for your son is the one he is most comfortable with.

    In t-ball my son used a 9.5. When he moved up to coach pitch I got him a 10 1/4 Akadema. Two spring seasons and two fall seasons later when he moved up a division, I figured he would see a lot of outfield time, so I got him an 11.5 Wilson. We've gone through another fall season and started the spring season and the Wilson still hasn't made it out to the field. He does fine with it if we are just tossing around, but when game time comes, he is more comfortable with the old 10 1/4. In all honesty the smaller glove seems "right" when he is wearing it. The 11.5 seems a little big - not overly big for outfield maybe, but probably too big to handle well in the infield.

    As for the coach, he should at least take the time to see how the kids do with the gloves they have. If the kid is comfortable with the glove, why force something else on him? Personally, I have seen more balls get misplayed by players using gloves that were too big for them, than by players using a glove that may have been too small for them.

    The 10.5 is probably the correct size for your son, but let it be his decision as to what feels best.

    If the coach has a problem with your son using a glove that's too small, just tell him that your son is emulating his favorite player - Glen Hubbard.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by ralanprod View Post

    The 10.5 is probably the correct size for your son, but let it be his decision as to what feels best.

    If the coach has a problem with your son using a glove that's too small, just tell him that your son is emulating his favorite player - Glen Hubbard.
    Any recommendations for a 10.5 glove that doesn't require much break in time, or does with a good breakin regimen.

  5. #5
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    My son had a Nokona 10.5 that was $35. But he out grew that. He's now 5' 90 lbs. (he just turned 8) and now uses his older brother's SSK 11.25.

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    Quote Originally Posted by joeR View Post
    Any recommendations for a 10.5 glove that doesn't require much break in time, or does with a good breakin regimen.
    Here are a couple of suggestions:

    http://www.justballgloves.com/product.view.aspx?p=7549

    http://www.justballgloves.com/product.view.aspx?p=7382

    http://www.justballgloves.com/product.view.aspx?p=7640

    My son used the 11" Akadema glove from 8U coach pitch until last year as a 10U infielder. The red-blue Akadema is a very flexible leather glove made for yournger players. The Louisville Slugger glove is a good choice for a younger player, and the I web makes it easier to squeeze. In all cases those gloves should break in with a minimum amount of playing catch. Good Luck!
    Have Fun and Play Hard!

    Chuck Faulkner
    Tazewell TN 37879
    The Glove Medic

  7. #7
    I guess I should have posted that http://www.justballgloves.com/product.view.aspx?p=7413
    is the newer model of the glove that he is using now.

    This is the exact glove http://cgi.ebay.com/Wilson-Youth-EZ-...QQcmdZViewItem

  8. #8
    The red-blue Akadema is a very flexible leather glove made for yournger players.
    Is the red-blue one as bright in person as in the image?

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    Joe, my son is nearly 12 years old and for the last two years he has used a Rawlings Gold Glove similiar to the on shown here: http://www.ballgloves.com/cgi-local/p.pl?GG1100

    His glove is 11 3/4" and he plays short, 2nd, center and pitches... The glove was stiff at first but broke in very nicely. IMO the Rawlings Gold Glove series are some of the finest gloves you can buy they realy mold to your hand nicely as they break-in.

    Coop.

  10. #10
    At that age, GG's are too expensive, IMO. My kids liked the Mizuno Franchise. Inexpensive, and ready to use right off the rack. Just my two cents...

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by joeR View Post
    Any recommendations for a 10.5 glove that doesn't require much break in time, or does with a good breakin regimen.
    My son used to use a Rawlings Jeter model in rec ball. It's $29 and good to go right off the shelf. I bought him an A2000 for high school. It sits in the bag. He's comfortable and confident with his $90 TPX Hoss.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by coops View Post
    Joe, my son is nearly 12 years old and for the last two years he has used a Rawlings Gold Glove similiar to the on shown here: http://www.ballgloves.com/cgi-local/p.pl?GG1100

    His glove is 11 3/4" and he plays short, 2nd, center and pitches... The glove was stiff at first but broke in very nicely. IMO the Rawlings Gold Glove series are some of the finest gloves you can buy they realy mold to your hand nicely as they break-in.

    Coop.
    A 7U player needs the best glove money can buy? He should have a glove under $50.

  13. #13
    As a T-Ball coach, one of the most common mistakes I see parents make is getting gloves that are way too big for their kids. I've seen 5 year olds wearing 11.5" gloves. The problem is, once a kid gets used to a giant glove like that it's hard to get him to drop back down. There are a lot of reasons not to get a kid a glove that's too big, but the bottom line is they can't control it. It's like trying to learn to ride a bike when they can't reach the pedals.

    A blanket statement of 10.5" or larger for T-Ball is ridiculous. My son is 4'8", 90+ lbs. and he still uses a 10" glove. We will move up this year, but honestly I think he would be fine with the 10". He catches great with it, plus it's already broken in.

    I think your son would be fine with 10 or 10.5" but I definitely wouldn't go any bigger than that. If it weren't for the possibility of upsetting his coach I would recommend 10" for his size and age.

    One brand I would recommend looking at is CHAMPRO. Their gloves are real leather, high quality, easy to break in, and not too expensive. In my opinion their youth gloves are just as good or better than the "name brand" competition. One reason is they don't advertise, so all that money goes directly into the product. Another reason is they specialize in youth gloves, whereas with most other brands the youth market (i.e. anything below H.S.) is an afterthought. They make a pretty good-looking glove too. My son got quite a few compliments on his last year.

    I also agree with the comments regarding value. You don't want to spend too much on a glove you'll be replacing in a couple years. That's why I like CHAMPRO.

  14. #14
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    Actually I agree w/ TG... somewhere in the thread I lost track of the age. At 7 brand is not a big deal. Just don't get one of those Nike gloves that look like they have spiderman webbing.

    Some good choices from a great web site:
    http://www.baseballsavings.com/custo...TEGORY_ID=5121
    http://www.baseballsavings.com/custo...TEGORY_ID=5015

    Hope you find the right glove for your son.
    Coop

  15. #15
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    My sons first glove was a walMart special that was one of those fake leather gloves. For some of you it was like the same material they use to make fake leather disco cloth out of. It never got broken in and after the first season I got him a leather glove. I am to old to remember so don't ask me the model #. Buy a leather glove is my only opinion. Or http://www.akademapro.com/rookie.html
    This company makes a good youth model glove and they fall in between price wise. They are easy to break in, extra soft leather. If you Google the model number and make of the glove you can find them cheaper on the net. Besides the disco glove I first bought after that experience, I went cheap leather one other time and finally learned my lesson, from than on I bought my son nothing but akadema gloves. Good product and not over the top price wise. Plus my son likes there glove/mitts.



    I got my son a new glove each time he moved up a level in little league, coach pitch to minor and than majors now Junior Little league and (American legion ball maybe if he wants that much baseball this summer) and JV HS baseball, he now plays catcher and the price of baseball went up last fall ball season with new catcher mitt/equipment metal cleats, -3 bat and new infield glove, new catcher bag(No Errors E2 Equipment Bag) to carry all the equipment, helmet, sliding short, batting gloves, practice pants, ice packs etc.



    good memories, more to come,

    drill
    Last edited by Drill; 02-22-2008 at 05:47 AM.
    Yogi Berra was asked by a reporter "How do you catch a knuckle ball?" He came right back and said "When it stops rolling"

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by joeR View Post
    Is the red-blue one as bright in person as in the image?
    Not quite. But it is still a looker if you want to model your game after Manny. Me, I still prefer black or brown leather. Apparently, the colored gloves are quite the rage in Japan and mexico.
    Have Fun and Play Hard!

    Chuck Faulkner
    Tazewell TN 37879
    The Glove Medic

  17. #17
    Regarding the Manny replica - I would stay away from it if you plan on him pitching. The big white "Akadema" patch and logo would probably make it illegal to pitch with.

  18. #18
    I found an 11" Rawlings Gold Glove on 60% off clearance around $40, but didn't get it yet. I haven't found any Akadema glove dealers to look at the gloves suggested. The Akadema says it is softer for kids - would it be a better choice? It is strange to purchase it without seeing it first.

  19. #19
    For a 7 yo, softer is definitely better. If you don't mind, where did you find the GG for 40 bucks? My 13 yo needs an 11.5 or so since he got moved to third.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by joeR View Post
    I found an 11" Rawlings Gold Glove on 60% off clearance around $40, but didn't get it yet. I haven't found any Akadema glove dealers to look at the gloves suggested. The Akadema says it is softer for kids - would it be a better choice? It is strange to purchase it without seeing it first.
    You will have a tough time finding an Akadema dealer to try the glove on. I have a couple gloves left over from my dealer days and will have them out for sale at tournaments. Most of their sales are over the internet. Good luck. I also want to know about the Rawling GG for $40.
    Have Fun and Play Hard!

    Chuck Faulkner
    Tazewell TN 37879
    The Glove Medic

  21. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by glovemedic View Post
    You will have a tough time finding an Akadema dealer to try the glove on. I have a couple gloves left over from my dealer days and will have them out for sale at tournaments. Most of their sales are over the internet. Good luck. I also want to know about the Rawling GG for $40.
    It was a local place in Georgia NW of Atlanta near Duluth called MVP on Old Peachtree Road. The owner said they are closing out last years gloves for new stock they have coming in. They had an 11" GG and an 11" easton (I think was $25) that he suggested to me.

  22. #22
    double post

  23. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by joeR View Post
    What size glove would you recommend for a 7 year old that is average in size about 4'2" 58 lbs? He currently is using a 9.5" t-ball glove rated for 3-5 year olds that he catches well with. His rec team coach made a blanket statement that team member gloves should be 10.5" or larger.
    It seems silly to see some of the shovel type gloves being used like opening a garbage bag and hoping it falls in. However, maybe he does need one that is a bit bigger? Any suggestions?
    joeR,

    Thru the years of looking at gloves for my now 12 year old son, the one thing I would caution you on is how gloves are catorgorized. The size as you probably are aware, is measured from the bottom of the palm of the glove to the top of the glove. There is no mention on the size of the width of the glove across the bottom of the palm, and that dimension can change greatly from an adult to a child glove (beacause of the size of their hand). It is not always clear (or they give you a wide age range) of the size of the hand a glove is designed for. The bottom line for me was to investigate the various manufacturers models online, then find a local sports store that has a wide range of gloves that you are interested in.

    The most important part is to have your son can try the gloves on to see what he is comfortable with.

    Hope this helps

    Slugger3

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    what if the glove is too big?

    Ok here is a question.

    What if the kid uses a glove that is too big for an entire year, he does ok with it, but could still use a smaller glove. Should you make him go back to a smaller glove and develop more refined skills or let him continue using the bigger glove. Will the use of the bigger glove help him at all as he gets big enough to actually handle it?

    I'm talking 7 to 9 yr olds.

    Cally

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    Quote Originally Posted by callyjr View Post
    Ok here is a question.
    What if the kid uses a glove that is too big for an entire year, he does ok with it, but could still use a smaller glove. Should you make him go back to a smaller glove and develop more refined skills or let him continue using the bigger glove. Will the use of the bigger glove help him at all as he gets big enough to actually handle it? I'm talking 7 to 9 yr olds.
    I would encourage dropping down a size. I managed to get our SS as a 9u to drop down from his dad's 12" glove to the Akadema AZR95. The result was fundamentally sound ground ball fielding and ball/hand transfers. He is still using the glove as an 11U and the way our middle infielders have been working I am looking forward to a couple 6-4-3's this season. It has been awesome to watch the development.

    Not every kid will handle that transition, but if you introduce it correctly, I am guessing the kid will adopt the smaller glove without a lot of angst. My son recently went back to his AZR 95 and decided his Rawlings GG Pro-taper 11.25" is better suited for outfield play. He did this on his own (without a word from me) after he found himself digging for the ball in the pocket on his flip drills.
    Have Fun and Play Hard!

    Chuck Faulkner
    Tazewell TN 37879
    The Glove Medic

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