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Thread: 1980's Baseball Cards

  1. 1980's Baseball Cards

    Do you all think that cards from the 1980's will eventually see the types of price increases that earlier year vintage cards have seen? It is difficult to say for sure but it seems to me that it is just a matter of time before they do. History seems to have a habit of forgiving things such as overproduction when other factors become more relevant in later years. Who knows.
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  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by mybaseballcardspace View Post
    Do you all think that cards from the 1980's will eventually see the types of price increases that earlier year vintage cards have seen? It is difficult to say for sure but it seems to me that it is just a matter of time before they do. History seems to have a habit of forgiving things such as overproduction when other factors become more relevant in later years. Who knows.

    That would be nice, but I don't think we are going to see a big increase between now to 20 years from now. It depends whether the hobby has another resurgence like what happened in the mid-80s. Their is that chance, but you never know. I find it disappointing that some of the "staple" cards from the era have dropped in price like the Mattingly and Ripken Donruss rookies as in the latest Beckett. Either way, I'm not banking on my '87 Topps set being worth $300 in 2030.

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    I really hope so. I been wanting to get rid of all my 80's-90's cards but im always thinking about there future value.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Extra Innings View Post
    That would be nice, but I don't think we are going to see a big increase between now to 20 years from now. It depends whether the hobby has another resurgence like what happened in the mid-80s. Their is that chance, but you never know. I find it disappointing that some of the "staple" cards from the era have dropped in price like the Mattingly and Ripken Donruss rookies as in the latest Beckett. Either way, I'm not banking on my '87 Topps set being worth $300 in 2030.
    Then again, $300 in 2030 may not mean very much. Gotta love the fake wood-grain borders on the `87 set. I used to think Danny Tartabull was the game's next big star.
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  5. #5
    Does history forget things like overproduction? And, when there was as much overproduction as there was in the 80's and 90's, how soon until those cards do become rare like the more vintage cards have over time.

    Around the time Score, Upper Deck, Leaf separate from Donruss, etc. joined the fray, my gem mint Yaz rookie was going around $300. In a few years, its value dropped over 50%. Just so much out there without any real direction even the stuff that should have been valuable suffered. I think that era not only hurt itself but all collecting in general. It won't be looked upon fondly.
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    They were super over mass-produced. (does that make sense?) With that being said, there are ample supplies of sets, singles and wax boxes available on EBay really cheap. I just don't see massive price increases unless the supply goes down dramatically.
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    Sorry, based on the overproduction (as others have stated above) and just the general quality of the cards, I say no way.

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    One last thing is the quality of stars, or lack of. From the mid 80's to the early 90's you have guys like Bonds, McGwire, Clemens, Canseco, Palmeiro etc who were all juicers. Cheating significantly decreases the value of these cards even more.
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  9. Response to 1980's Baseball Thread

    But if the cards keep being sold cheaply on ebay like they are now, eventually there will not be as much. I agree and see that the cards from the 1980's that are lower priced are consistently sold at affordable prices on ebay right now. That will continue for quite some time in my opinion.

    Ten years from now though, with those boxes of baseball cards being marketed heavily by heavyweight baseball sellers such as the Baseball Card Kid and Kruk Cards, what happens when the supply even from them starts to dry? Maybe it will not take ten years with such overproduction (It has already been 20+ and there has been practically no price appreciation) and it might take 20 or 30. There is at least a decent chance that the supply will shrink and that the demand will increase.

    The cycle referred to in the 1990's where the card values suffered was very widespread and was related to the baseball strike according to things I have read on it. That was one of the more dubious time frames for card collecting.

    The speculators returning to baseball cards is not too far fetched in my opinion. Oil rose dramatically in the early 1980's with stagflation. Oil is rising dramatically now and some would say we are experiencing some degree of stagflation. The last time that happened, 10 years later we saw baseball card values go through the roof.

    In conclusion, I feel that there are a lot of things that could go right for the cards. I think that all of us take a short-term view and evaluate them based on the past performance of them and their current market values (which would disappoint practically any collector).
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    Another difference is that the 1980's cards are in better condition because we all know now that cards are worth more in great condition. But what about cards that are thrown out because people consider them worthless? Multiply that effect by 10, 20, 30 years?
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  11. #11
    '80's cards go up in value? It would be nice to see, but values are based on supply and demand. Look what happened to those McGwire rookies in 1998. They went through the roof! A few short years later they crashed and have never resurfaced. The demand was great for those cards at the time. Now there is no demand. For '80's cards to go up in value the demand will have to be greater than the supply...or the perceived supply. With some much over production, I don't see that happening.

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    Until someone systematically starts destroying that over-produced product from that era, supply will always be there, lurking in the closets of tens of thousands of collectors, just waiting to hit the market again.

    Now until someone like Paul Allen decided to buy up every case of un-opened 1988 Donruss and use them as some sort of alternative energy source, there will always be 500,000,000 of each Mark Grace RR.

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by DaClyde View Post
    Until someone systematically starts destroying that over-produced product from that era, supply will always be there, lurking in the closets of tens of thousands of collectors, just waiting to hit the market again.

    Now until someone like Paul Allen decided to buy up every case of un-opened 1988 Donruss and use them as some sort of alternative energy source, there will always be 500,000,000 of each Mark Grace RR.
    What an idea!

  14. It is supply and demand for cards and I know we are not there on the cards from the 1980's yet. I still don't think that we need anything extreme such as a drastic reduction in supply in order for the cards to increase in value over time. I have seen prices say for 1986 Topps Baseball vending cases increase ever so slightly to now from say 3 years ago. At least it seems like they are getting a bit more popular. I guess we will see and if they do go up eventually, whoever keeps some in their collection will be happy.
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  15. #15
    The demand will not increase because of the multitude of reasons stated above. Another reason is that the stars / Hall of Famers of that era aren't revered in baseball lore as Williams, DiMaggio, Mantle, Mays, Aaron, etc etc.

    Their stories (the retired players from the 80's) aren't being romanticized the same way. The people who did follow those players from the 80's still have their cards. The people who followed those players from the 40's, 50's and 60's THREW OUT their cards and then as they got older and had more money, they tried to buy back their memories. The problem was that the supply couldn't match up to the demand. There are hundreds of thousands of mint McGwire, Bonds, Maddux, Clemens, Gooden, Mattingly, Strawberry, Smoltz, Glavine, Griffey rookies available for a few dollars each. There isn't even close to the same quantity of mint rookies available of the aforementioned legends.

    You could have most collectors burn their collections and there will still be tons of unopened boxes of 80's and 90's crap in a warehouse, basement or storage somewhere.

    In 50 years, are kids going to be clamoring for baseball cards from the 80's? I doubt it. And if they are, they'll be easy to find. Someone might make a profit, but is it a profit worth waiting for in terms of taking up the space in one's house to carry all of this "junk"?

    I'd say get whatever you can with your 80's crap now, and take that money and either invest in some vintage cards or some stocks. You'll do better in the long run. Case in point:

    I recently sold my set of 1986 topps on ebay for like 13 bucks. I think my mom paid $35 for it back in maybe 1990? What kind of investment is a product that over 18 years, went down 60%? It's never going to recover if you factor in inflation.

  16. The investment value of the cards has been terrible. By any measure you are right about that.

    I argue that Mays, Aaron, Mantle, etc. became more popular later after they retired. Who is to say that the same thing cannot happen with Mattingly, Henderson, Gwynn, Boggs, Canseco, Bonds, Maddux, etc. There are big names. There are also all of the hall of famers such as Nolan Ryan, George Brett, Tom Seaver, Rod Carew, Pete Rose (not a hall of famer), etc. Rookies of Joe Carter, Cecil Fielder, Bo Jackson, Julio Franco (who has at least an outside chance of a hall nod), Dwight Gooden, etc. also have interest among collectors. The stuff is out aplenty but certainly has the star power. The overproduction is overwhelming though.

    If they are looked upon more favorably later on in the years, it will help them back to some value I think. I think it is terrible that the orignal factory value and the price of $35 in 1990 for a 1986 Topps set makes it even more difficult to make a profit. I am not saying buy the cards (if you do buy the cards make sure to buy them very low), I am saying hold on to what you have.
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaClyde View Post
    Until someone systematically starts destroying that over-produced product from that era, supply will always be there, lurking in the closets of tens of thousands of collectors, just waiting to hit the market again.

    Now until someone like Paul Allen decided to buy up every case of un-opened 1988 Donruss and use them as some sort of alternative energy source, there will always be 500,000,000 of each Mark Grace RR.
    That's the only thing that would work. It's not like the supply of oil here where it gets used up & it's gone. Some of you might know about the 1952 Topps cards. What makes them even more valuable is the lack of demand. Well back in 1952, Topps charted a boat, filled it with cards and dumped them into the ocean. 100's of cases. I'm sure that had an impact on supply & demand. The reason: they couldn't get rid off the excess cards.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mybaseballcardspace View Post
    The investment value of the cards has been terrible. By any measure you are right about that.

    I argue that Mays, Aaron, Mantle, etc. became more popular later after they retired. Who is to say that the same thing cannot happen with Mattingly, Henderson, Gwynn, Boggs, Canseco, Bonds, Maddux, etc. There are big names. There are also all of the hall of famers such as Nolan Ryan, George Brett, Tom Seaver, Rod Carew, Pete Rose (not a hall of famer), etc. Rookies of Joe Carter, Cecil Fielder, Bo Jackson, Julio Franco (who has at least an outside chance of a hall nod), Dwight Gooden, etc. also have interest among collectors. The stuff is out aplenty but certainly has the star power. The overproduction is overwhelming though.

    If they are looked upon more favorably later on in the years, it will help them back to some value I think. I think it is terrible that the orignal factory value and the price of $35 in 1990 for a 1986 Topps set makes it even more difficult to make a profit. I am not saying buy the cards (if you do buy the cards make sure to buy them very low), I am saying hold on to what you have.
    Because there are millions more of each player available in the '80s. Millions.
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  19. Markets can remain irrational longer than the average investor can remain solvent according to various financial minds.

    Look at oil right now, they say the supply demand indicates $70 and we are at $140+. If the speculation fever hits baseball cards again, the supply demand might indicate a lower price than what it will trade for. When the speculation last hit baseball cards, I remember as a kid being able to go into a baseball card store with a Nolan Ryan card worth $1 in the price guide and get 50 cents in exchange for the card. If that happens again, any one of us with collections of any sort will have a nice gift awaiting.
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    Quote Originally Posted by mybaseballcardspace View Post
    Markets can remain irrational longer than the average investor can remain solvent according to various financial minds.

    Look at oil right now, they say the supply demand indicates $70 and we are at $140+. If the speculation fever hits baseball cards again, the supply demand might indicate a lower price than what it will trade for. When the speculation last hit baseball cards, I remember as a kid being able to go into a baseball card store with a Nolan Ryan card worth $1 in the price guide and get 50 cents in exchange for the card. If that happens again, any one of us with collections of any sort will have a nice gift awaiting.
    But oil gets used up. That both effects the supply and the demand.

    I could go all day here, I have a degree in Economics.
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  21. How about simply increasing the number of collectors? If we had more collectors, demand would increase. With the economy the way it is now, buying a box of 1988 Topps baseball cards is cheaper than a lot of other things to collect. If we doubled the number of collectors from what the number is now, demand would practically double. They are not printing any more cards unless they are new ones.
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    Part of the problem is that you'd have to depend on the same card companies that have managed to drive away a good 80% of their own market in the last 15 years to expand the collecting base. There's just no entry point for little kids into the hobby anymore when the cheapest pack you can find is $1 for like 7 or 8 cards.
    Last edited by DaClyde; 07-05-2008 at 09:12 AM.

  23. The introduction of game used and autographed cards has drastically changed the suggested retail price of cards as well it should. If they had packs without them, they could be cheaper.
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    Never.

    Supply and Demand will ALWAYS keep post 1980 cards super cheap. Way too common, and there is still tons of unopened stuff hidden away in closets/garages/warehouses.

    The supply will become even bigger in the future when the unopened is opened, and the demand will drop even more with the players all retiring and out of the spotlight.

    Dump all the new stuff, if youre in it for the investment aspect, and buy preWWII stuff (naturally rare).
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  25. How can we all agree that the 1980's cards should be sold now? The prices are too low.
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