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Thread: Sporcle Games

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2005
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    Western Massachusetts
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    Sporcle Games

    I find these to be fun. There are a number of baseball related ones. A few days ago they just put up one with all the .400 hitters. Here's a link:

    http://www.sporcle.com/games/mlb400hitters.php

    I got 20 out of 35. Usually after I do an entertainment one or something (and usually do badly), I'll go back to a baseball one so I can feel smart again.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
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    Cincinnati, Ohio
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    Did your .400 hitters one and got 19. Not very good with the 19th century hitters, never heard of Yank Robinson haha.

    The one i do a lot is the HOF one. I have been doing it about once a week for a couple months and the best i have done is 172.

    G Man

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
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    Sunny Sweden
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    1,636
    Your Yank Robinson comment made me head there- Sporcle has some of their information wrong. They obviously used an old Baseball Encyclopedia for their stats, and here's why. In 1887, for just one season, a walk was counted as a hit, that's why you get ridiculous averages like Tip O'Neill's (which Sporcle lists as .485, but which many old books used to list as .492) and all those .400 hitters. If you look at players OBP from 1887, you'll see that it corresponds to what older books have for that season's batting averages (without HBP).

    If you look at modern stat sites (baseball-reference.com, retrosheet, etc.), you will find that for the past few decades 1887 has been re-evaluated with the walk rule that was in effect every other season of major league history, and there are consequently only two "real" .400 hitters from 1887: Tip O'Neill and Pete Browning.

    But shame on you for not knowing who Yank Robinson was! Even though he never hit .400 (he never even hit .310), he was an excellent second baseman and a vital part of the Brown's 1880s dynasty, with an eye for walks that rivaled Ted Williams (that's why his .305 average in 1887 gets beefed up to an OBP of .445). He was also one of the few to play in the NL, AA, UA, and PL.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
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    Cincinnati, Ohio
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    I dont do good with 19th century players, really.

    But i did know the 1887 and the walk counts as hit rule for that season. I just assumed they were going with the records of the time. However, if you drop a bunch of those guys out, then my 19 looks a lot better, so i like that... haha... I did know Tip O'Neill, because of the magnitude of his number, i think thats where i heard of him before, but i didnt spell his name right, haha.. left off an "l".

    G Man

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Atlanta
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    3,166
    Wow these games are a lot of fun. I got 15/35 on the history one, I know little to nothing about 19th century baseball.
    People ask me what I do in winter when there's no baseball. I'll tell you what I do. I stare out the window and wait for spring. -Rogers Hornsby

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Western Massachusetts
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    Here's another one, home run leaders A-Z, by last name:

    http://www.sporcle.com/games/azhomerunleaders.php

    I got 18/25. A few I should've gotten for sure.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Western Massachusetts
    Posts
    11,567
    All Star Game MVPs:

    http://www.sporcle.com/games/mlballstarmvps.php

    Got 37/49.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Williamsport PA
    Posts
    2,862
    Can you type 232 Hall of Famers in twenty minutes?

    http://www.sporcle.com/games/mlbhalloffamers.php

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