View Poll Results: What type of game would you see if you had a time travel machine

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  • A game featuring a personal achievement such as a no-hitter, 4 HR game, Gibson 17 WS K's etc.

    4 23.53%
  • A milestone game, such as Aaron #715, Ripken #2131, Rose #4192

    2 11.76%
  • A great post season game such as 1975 WSG6, 1986 WSG6, 2001 WSG7

    7 41.18%
  • A "historic" game such as Ruth's called shot, Mays hitting Chapman, Brett's pine tar game

    2 11.76%
  • other, including a game in the future, like baseball in 2050

    2 11.76%
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Thread: Baseball's best moments

  1. #1

    Baseball's best moments

    you have a time machine and can travel back in time, knowing the results in advance.

    what type of game would you go see (all examples are just examples, not specifically what you are voting on)


    1) a great personal accomplishment like a no-hitter, a 4 HR game by a player, Gibson's 17 WS K's etc

    2) a milestone game Aaron's 715th, Ripken's 2,131st, Rose's 4,192 etc.

    3) a classic post season game, 1975 world series game 6, 1986 world series game 6, 2001 world series game 7 etc.

    4) a "historic" game, Ruth's called shot, Mays hitting Chapman, Brett's pine tar game etc.

    5) other including a game in the future like baseball in 2050 etc.
    Last edited by 9RoyHobbsRF; 12-20-2009 at 01:19 PM.
    1. The more I learn, the more convinced I am that many players are over-rated due to inflated stats from offensive home parks (and eras)
    2. Strat-O-Matic Baseball Player, Collector and Hobbyist since 1969, visit my strat site: http://somgamersparadiseforum.smfforfree4.com/index.php

  2. #2
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    I've been at

    1) a perfect game
    2) Bonds' 762nd
    3) 1986 WS Game 6
    4) a game where Social Security-eligible Julio Franco stole a base

    So I'll have to go with a game from the future.
    Quote Originally Posted by Cougar View Post
    "Read at your own risk. Baseball Fever shall not be responsible if you become clinically insane trying to make sense of this post. People under 18 must read in the presence of a parent, guardian, licensed professional, or Dr. Phil."

  3. #3

    20th century games

    A historic game in some sense, probably combining the given alternatives 3, 4, 5.

    - am i sure to return or must i take the risks of the time and place?
    - am i dressed for the weather conditions and the length of the game?
    - do i bring back a clear memory of the experience?
    - do i have some research time before going and a good memory for what i learn?
    - do i have money to spend in the ballpark?
    (not thousand$ to bet on the outcome but enough to buy all i can eat or drink)

    I suppose Yes, Yes, Yes, Yes, Yes. That's the spirit, right? I'm warm enough even if contemporary fans are not. I know when to go to the john, when to pay riveted attention to the play, when it's ok to look around the stands for someone selling hot sausage or cold beer, which I am able to buy and consume.


    If any one of the following is a Yes, then I would certainly choose a game in Henry Chadwick's time. The only 20th century temptations would be as a "fly on the wall" amid the baseball writers at one of the Black Sox games, or moving around the stands at one of Jackie Robinson's debuts, probably at Philadelphia or St. Louis.

    - may i return with anything tangible such as a completed scorecard?
    - may i sit next to someone specific and engage in conversation?
    - may i go anywhere unobtrusively as the proverbial "fly on the wall"?
    - may i go to the ballpark neighborhood a couple hours before the game?
    - may i stay all night, taking in the celebration if any?
    (with some spending money in either case)

    If every one of those is a No, the journey would be purely the spectator experience inside the ballpark. I would probably choose one of the older games anyway, for the greater historical novelty and import from my perspective, but some 20th century games would be tempting.


    20th century games

    1908 Sep 23 @ The Polo Grounds IV
    : Cubs tie Giants 1-1 with O'Day and Emslie as home and base umpire. The game ends with "Merkle's boner" and a riot. The teams remain tied for the NL pennant with the Pirates one back.

    Better I would hang around and read the newspapers, go to coffee shops and pubs, if not see the makeup game too. If the journey is inside the ballpark, from batting practice until everyone clears out, this may be the 20th century winner. The concluding play and the riot may be enough, just to be eye- and body- witness. Of course this supposes I am sure to return and I bring back a clear memory.


    1912 WS game 8 @ Fenway Park, closing its first season
    : Red Sox win at home, 3-2 in 10 innings. The 2-run rally against relief pitcher Christy Mathewson includes "Snodgrass' muff" and Matty's blown call.

    There are plenty of middle innings to explore Fenway Park. The same holds for the 1908 and 1924 games but Fenway Park is a greater attraction. This is the 20th century winner if the journey covers 12 or 24 hours with spending money. The action and the ballpark may be enough anyway.


    1924 WS game 7 @ Griffith Stadium
    : Senators win at home, 4-3 in 12 innings. Walter Johnson a 4-inning shutout at the end. The two-run rally inn 8 includes a bad-hop single thru 3b Fred Lindstrom; the winning rally includes E2 Hank Gowdy on a foul pop, a bad-hop double thru Lindstrom, and E6 Travis Jackson on a ground ball by Johnson.

    Three hours: more baseball and more time to explore the ballpark. Unfortunately it's at Griffith Stadium, the celebration is in DC, and it's late for great historical interest.


    Honorable Mention

    1925 WS game 7 @ Forbes Field
    : Pirates win at home, 9-7 on two late rallies against Walter Johnson. This may be the best game to be at Forbes Field.

    1960 WS game 7 @ Forbes Field
    : Pirates win at home 10-9 on a big late rally and a walkoff homerun against the Yankees, who do some damage too.

    1909 WS game 5 @ Forbes Field, the last in its first season
    : Babe Adams wins again, the Pirates lead 3-2. A close game for 6-1/2 innings, better than the first two home games, and there are more open seats in the ballpark. Really I would research the weather at all three games. The first season at Forbes Field is a big part of the attraction but the Pirates ran away with the NL pennant and none of the three WS games was a cliffhanger or the decider.
    Last edited by Paul Wendt; 12-20-2009 at 05:16 PM.

  4. #4

    other, a game in the distant past

    My 20th century games are World Series games, type three, except one "historic" type four with great championship import. I didn't write up any of the early games and now my time has run out, but let me explain quickly.

    Quoting myself
    >>
    If any one of the following is a Yes, then I would certainly choose a game in Henry Chadwick's time.
    <<

    Since the crux of the matter would be to experience a game in the distant past, I will answer the poll
    5. "other including a game in the future like baseball in 2050 etc."

    The particular game would be also be "historic" as in option 4 (there are several games 1858 to 1869 that I have in mind), or it would be a championship game as in option 3, namely 1886 WS game 6.
    Last edited by Paul Wendt; 12-20-2009 at 05:36 PM.

  5. #5
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    There are of course specific games I'd love to see, maybe Koufax's perfect game in 1965, the 16-inning pitcher's duel between Spahn and Marichal in 1963, Stan Musial's 5 homers in a doubleheader in 1954, Don Larsen's perfecto in the 1956 WS, etc.

    But I voted "other". I think I would most enjoy a typical regular season game in another era, say, a Dodgers game at Ebbets Field in the 1940's, or a game at Yankee Stadium in the days of Ruth and Gehrig. Maybe a few 19th century games, Negro League games, and so forth.
    Last edited by ol' aches and pains; 12-22-2009 at 10:29 AM.
    "Tactics were resorted to, unworthy of fair, manly players" - Brooklyn Eagle, June 12,1890

  6. #6
    Stan Musial's 5 homers in a doubleheader in 1954


    a young baseball fan named Nate Colbert was actually at that double header

    later in his career, Colbert hit 5 home runs in a double header

    announcer Milo Hamilton announced all 4 games
    1. The more I learn, the more convinced I am that many players are over-rated due to inflated stats from offensive home parks (and eras)
    2. Strat-O-Matic Baseball Player, Collector and Hobbyist since 1969, visit my strat site: http://somgamersparadiseforum.smfforfree4.com/index.php

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by 9RoyHobbsRF View Post
    Stan Musial's 5 homers in a doubleheader in 1954


    a young baseball fan named Nate Colbert was actually at that double header

    later in his career, Colbert hit 5 home runs in a double header

    announcer Milo Hamilton announced all 4 games
    Holy Toledo!
    "Tactics were resorted to, unworthy of fair, manly players" - Brooklyn Eagle, June 12,1890

  8. #8
    just 5 votes?
    1. The more I learn, the more convinced I am that many players are over-rated due to inflated stats from offensive home parks (and eras)
    2. Strat-O-Matic Baseball Player, Collector and Hobbyist since 1969, visit my strat site: http://somgamersparadiseforum.smfforfree4.com/index.php

  9. #9
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    I'm from Chicago, if you like, I can vote again.
    "Tactics were resorted to, unworthy of fair, manly players" - Brooklyn Eagle, June 12,1890

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by ol' aches and pains View Post
    I'm from Chicago, if you like, I can vote again.
    Now that's funny!

  11. #11
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    I'd like to go back and watch the very first professional baseball game, whenever that was.
    Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

    http://sfgiants-forum.com/forum/index.php

  12. #12
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    I'd probably go back and lay a lot of money on the last game of the upset 1906 or 1918 World Series
    Mythical SF Chronicle scouting report: "That Jeff runs like a deer. Unfortunately, he also hits AND throws like one." I am Venus DeMilo - NO ARM! I can play like a big leaguer, I can field like Luzinski, run like Lombardi. The secret to managing is keeping the ones who hate you away from the undecided ones. I am a triumph of quantity over quality. I'm almost useful, every village needs an idiot.
    Good traders: MadHatter(2), BoofBonser26, StormSurge

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by RuthMayBond View Post
    I'd probably go back and lay a lot of money on the last game of the upset 1906 or 1918 World Series
    And don't forget the 1919 World Series!
    Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

    http://sfgiants-forum.com/forum/index.php

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Honus Wagner Rules View Post
    And don't forget the 1919 World Series!
    I don't want Landis banning me from ballparks or something (I'm not sure why the Chisox were favored so heavily)
    Mythical SF Chronicle scouting report: "That Jeff runs like a deer. Unfortunately, he also hits AND throws like one." I am Venus DeMilo - NO ARM! I can play like a big leaguer, I can field like Luzinski, run like Lombardi. The secret to managing is keeping the ones who hate you away from the undecided ones. I am a triumph of quantity over quality. I'm almost useful, every village needs an idiot.
    Good traders: MadHatter(2), BoofBonser26, StormSurge

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by RuthMayBond View Post
    I don't want Landis banning me from ballparks or something (I'm not sure why the Chisox were favored so heavily)
    I think of three reasons:

    1) The AL dominated the World Series in the 1910's. From 1910-18 the AL won eight of the nine World Series.

    1) The White Sox were the 1917 World Series champions and the 1919 team had many great stars.

    3) The 1919 Reds didn't really have any superstar players.
    Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

    http://sfgiants-forum.com/forum/index.php

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Honus Wagner Rules View Post
    3) The 1919 Reds didn't really have any superstar players.
    Heinie Groh & Edd Roush would like a word with you
    Mythical SF Chronicle scouting report: "That Jeff runs like a deer. Unfortunately, he also hits AND throws like one." I am Venus DeMilo - NO ARM! I can play like a big leaguer, I can field like Luzinski, run like Lombardi. The secret to managing is keeping the ones who hate you away from the undecided ones. I am a triumph of quantity over quality. I'm almost useful, every village needs an idiot.
    Good traders: MadHatter(2), BoofBonser26, StormSurge

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by RuthMayBond View Post
    Heinie Groh & Edd Roush would like a word with you
    I said "superstars" . I know Groh and Rouch were really good players but where they considered "superstars" in 1919?
    Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

    http://sfgiants-forum.com/forum/index.php

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Honus Wagner Rules View Post
    I said "superstars" . I know Groh and Rouch were really good players but where they considered "superstars" in 1919?
    Probably more so than any other Chisox who wore shoes
    Mythical SF Chronicle scouting report: "That Jeff runs like a deer. Unfortunately, he also hits AND throws like one." I am Venus DeMilo - NO ARM! I can play like a big leaguer, I can field like Luzinski, run like Lombardi. The secret to managing is keeping the ones who hate you away from the undecided ones. I am a triumph of quantity over quality. I'm almost useful, every village needs an idiot.
    Good traders: MadHatter(2), BoofBonser26, StormSurge

  19. #19
    3) The 1919 Reds didn't really have any superstar players.

    which national league single season team had the highest winning percentage of any nl team from 1910 - 1919

    answer 1919 cincinnati reds
    1. The more I learn, the more convinced I am that many players are over-rated due to inflated stats from offensive home parks (and eras)
    2. Strat-O-Matic Baseball Player, Collector and Hobbyist since 1969, visit my strat site: http://somgamersparadiseforum.smfforfree4.com/index.php

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by 9RoyHobbsRF View Post
    3) The 1919 Reds didn't really have any superstar players.

    which national league single season team had the highest winning percentage of any nl team from 1910 - 1919

    answer 1919 cincinnati reds
    That's true, up through 1919 . . .
    . . . but you could stretch it through 1941 and it would STILL apply
    Mythical SF Chronicle scouting report: "That Jeff runs like a deer. Unfortunately, he also hits AND throws like one." I am Venus DeMilo - NO ARM! I can play like a big leaguer, I can field like Luzinski, run like Lombardi. The secret to managing is keeping the ones who hate you away from the undecided ones. I am a triumph of quantity over quality. I'm almost useful, every village needs an idiot.
    Good traders: MadHatter(2), BoofBonser26, StormSurge

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Honus Wagner Rules View Post
    I said "superstars" . I know Groh and Rouch were really good players but where they considered "superstars" in 1919?
    Roush states in "The Glory of Their Times" that the 1919 Reds were a much better team than they were given credit for, and were quite capable of beating the White Sox on the level. But I suppose he would say that regardless.
    "Tactics were resorted to, unworthy of fair, manly players" - Brooklyn Eagle, June 12,1890

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by ol' aches and pains View Post
    Roush states in "The Glory of Their Times" that the 1919 Reds were a much better team than they were given credit for, and were quite capable of beating the White Sox on the level. But I suppose he would say that regardless.
    The "superstar" Chisox had a team ERA+ of 105.
    The "non" superstar Reds had a team ERA+ of 124.
    Mythical SF Chronicle scouting report: "That Jeff runs like a deer. Unfortunately, he also hits AND throws like one." I am Venus DeMilo - NO ARM! I can play like a big leaguer, I can field like Luzinski, run like Lombardi. The secret to managing is keeping the ones who hate you away from the undecided ones. I am a triumph of quantity over quality. I'm almost useful, every village needs an idiot.
    Good traders: MadHatter(2), BoofBonser26, StormSurge

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by 9RoyHobbsRF View Post
    3) The 1919 Reds didn't really have any superstar players.

    which national league single season team had the highest winning percentage of any nl team from 1910 - 1919

    answer 1919 cincinnati reds
    Yes, everyone knows that. But the NL was the same league that got whipped eight out of nine World Series from 1910-19. In those nine World Series the AL was 32-17-1 (.653 W%) against the NL. In the eight World Series losses the NL won just 13 games. The White Sox were heavily favored because at the time the AL was considered the stronger league.
    Last edited by Honus Wagner Rules; 12-22-2009 at 03:13 PM.
    Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

    http://sfgiants-forum.com/forum/index.php

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by RuthMayBond View Post
    Probably more so than any other Chisox who wore shoes
    So "Shoeless" Eddie Collins and "Shoeless" Joe Jackson AND "Shoeless" Eddie Cicotte were superstars.
    Last edited by nerfan; 12-22-2009 at 02:18 PM.
    Quote Originally Posted by Cougar View Post
    "Read at your own risk. Baseball Fever shall not be responsible if you become clinically insane trying to make sense of this post. People under 18 must read in the presence of a parent, guardian, licensed professional, or Dr. Phil."

  25. #25
    seems most people prefer a classic post season game
    1. The more I learn, the more convinced I am that many players are over-rated due to inflated stats from offensive home parks (and eras)
    2. Strat-O-Matic Baseball Player, Collector and Hobbyist since 1969, visit my strat site: http://somgamersparadiseforum.smfforfree4.com/index.php

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