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Thread: Abject futility

  1. #1

    Abject futility

    This is derived from a post I made in a thread about Dan Uggla. In 2014, Dan Uggla hit .149/.213/.229.

    Can you name the...

    15 players since 1950 to hit .149 or worse in a season (min. 140 at-bats)?

    1. Ray Oyler, 1968, .135 BA, 215 AB
    2. Wayne Causey, 1968, .149 BA, 148 AB
    3. Pat Rockett, 1978, .141 BA, 142 AB
    4. Norm Sherry, 1963, .136 BA, 147 AB
    5. Vic Harris, 1972, .140 BA, 186 AB
    6. Luis Pujols, 1978, .131 BA, 153 AB
    7. Chris Bando, 1985, .139 BA, 173 AB
    8. Bob Didier, 1970, .149 BA, 168 AB
    9. Jason LaRue, 2007, .148 BA, 169 AB
    10. Jose Oliva, 1995, .142 BA, 183 AB
    11. J.R. Towles, 2008, .137 BA, 146 AB
    12. Brandon Wood, 2010, .146 BA, 226 AB
    13. Michael Saunders, 2011, .149 BA, 161 AB
    14. Dan Uggla, 2014, .149 BA, 141 AB
    15. Luis Cruz, 2013, .145 BA, 173 AB

    Can you name the four players who slugged .213 or worse in 2014 (min. 140 at-bats)?

    1. Mark Ellis, .213 SLG, 178 AB
    2. Dan Uggla, .213 SLG, 141 AB
    3. Jose Molina, .187 SLG, 225 AB
    4. Leury Garcia, .207 SLG, 145 AB

    Not related to Dan Uggla, but - can you name the 14 players since 1980 to have single-digit or lower OPS+s (min. 100 AB)?

    Already listed are OPS+ and year.

    1. JB Shuck, 8 OPS+, 110 AB, 2014
    2. Luis Cruz, 5 OPS+, 173 AB, 2013
    3. Brandon Wood, 6 OPS+, 226 AB, 2010
    4. Tony Pena, 7 OPS+, 225 AB, 2008
    5. Kevin Cash, -2 OPS+, 106 AB, 2003
    6. Daryle Ward, 9 OPS+, 109 AB, 2003
    7. Mike Benjamin, 2 OPS+, 120 AB, 2002
    8. Mark Parent, 0 OPS+, 100 AB, 1997
    9. Rafael Belliard, 2, 142 AB, 1996
    10. Mike Laga, -12, 100 AB, 1988
    11. Greg Pryor, 8 OPS+, 112 AB, 1986
    12. Dave Martinez, 4 OPS+, 108 AB, 1986
    13. Steve Lake, 0 OPS+, 119 AB, 1985
    14. Angel Salazar, 9 OPS+, 174 AB, 1984
    15. Steve Carlton, 7 OPS+, 101 AB, 1980
    Last edited by Cowtipper; 12-14-2014 at 04:36 PM.

  2. #2
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    Enzo Hernandez?
    Dave Concepcion?
    edit: for the first question.

  3. #3
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    Ray Oyler for sure of the World Champion 1968 Tigers has to be on that club. BA .135, SLG. .186 OBP .213

    Worse than Uggla with more AB's I think.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by leagueleader View Post
    Ray Oyler for sure of the World Champion 1968 Tigers has to be on that club. BA .135, SLG. .186 OBP .213

    Worse than Uggla with more AB's I think.
    Ray Oyler is correct.

    Here are some hints for the first set of questions:

    1. I was a catcher who played for the Dodgers and Mets. My year of futility came in my sole year with New York. I made my debut with the Dodgers in the late 1950s.

    2. My year of futility came in 1968, my final campaign. I played for the White Sox, Angels and Braves that year. I began my big league career in 1955 with the Orioles but spent most of my career with Kansas City.

    3. My year of futility came in 1970, my second year in the big leagues. I was once traded straight up for Gene Lamont and, another deal, for Roe Skidmore. I spent my career with the Braves, Tigers and Red Sox.

    4. My year of futility came in 1972, my first campaign. The next year, I was the Rangers' primary center fielder. I also played for the Cubs, Cardinals, Giants and Brewers in my career.

    5. My year of futility came in 1978, the last year of my three-year career. I played entirely with the Braves during my major league tenure. I was a shortstop that was part of the trade that brought Chris Chambliss to Atlanta.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Cowtipper View Post
    1. I was a catcher who played for the Dodgers and Mets. My year of futility came in my sole year with New York. I made my debut with the Dodgers in the late 1950s.
    Joe Pignatano?

    2. My year of futility came in 1968, my final campaign. I played for the White Sox, Angels and Braves that year. I began my big league career in 1955 with the Orioles but spent most of my career with Kansas City.
    Wayne Causey?

    5. My year of futility came in 1978, the last year of my three-year career. I played entirely with the Braves during my major league tenure. I was a shortstop that was part of the trade that brought Chris Chambliss to Atlanta.
    Pat Rockett?

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by ian2813 View Post
    Joe Pignatano?



    Wayne Causey?



    Pat Rockett?
    Pignatano is incorrect, but Causey and Rockett are right.

  7. #7
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    Norm Sherry?
    The ball once struck off,
    Away flies the boy
    To the next destin'd post,
    And then home with joy.
    --Anonymous, 1744

  8. #8
    Norm Sherry is correct.

    Here are some more hints:

    1. My year of futility came in 1970, my second year in the big leagues. I was once traded straight up for Gene Lamont and, another deal, for Roe Skidmore. I spent my career with the Braves, Tigers and Red Sox. I was a catcher who hit zero home runs in my big league career. I'm the only big leaguer to have my surname, but a fairly well-known scout and executive who has worked for the Expos, Mariners, Diamondbacks and Blue Jays also has it.

    2. My year of futility came in 1972, my first campaign. The next year, I was the Rangers' primary center fielder. I also played for the Cubs, Cardinals, Giants and Brewers in my career. In 1973, I was involved in a trade that sent Bill Madlock to the Cubs and Fergie Jenkins to the Rangers. I was also once involved in a trade that sent Ted Kubiak and Don Mincher to Oakland.

    3. My year of futility came in 1978. A catcher, I spent most of my career with the Astros, but spent a little time with the Royals and Rangers. I led the league in passed balls in 1982. I share my surname with a popular modern player, but he I certainly was not.

    4. My year of futility came in 1985 with the Indians. I also played for the Tigers and Athletics. My brother had a successful career in the big leagues. I, like many of the guys on this list, was a catcher.

    5. I spent two years in the big leagues. My first one wasn't that bad - I had a 162 OPS+ with the Braves. But my second was terrible. I split that year between the Braves and Cardinals, having been traded partway through the year for minor leaguer Anton French. I was a Dominican third baseman.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Cowtipper View Post
    3. My year of futility came in 1978. A catcher, I spent most of my career with the Astros, but spent a little time with the Royals and Rangers. I led the league in passed balls in 1982. I share my surname with a popular modern player, but he I certainly was not.
    Luis Pujols?

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by ian2813 View Post
    Luis Pujols?
    ^^^this guy knows his baseball.

  11. #11
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    2. Vic Harris?

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by PVNICK View Post
    2. Vic Harris?
    ^^^this guy knows his baseball, too.

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Cowtipper View Post
    ^^^this guy knows his baseball.
    Thanks. The hint about sharing a name with a popular modern player helped.

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Cowtipper View Post

    4. My year of futility came in 1985 with the Indians. I also played for the Tigers and Athletics. My brother had a successful career in the big leagues. I, like many of the guys on this list, was a catcher.
    Chris Bando

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cowtipper View Post
    1. My year of futility came in 1970, my second year in the big leagues. I was once traded straight up for Gene Lamont and, another deal, for Roe Skidmore. I spent my career with the Braves, Tigers and Red Sox. I was a catcher who hit zero home runs in my big league career. I'm the only big leaguer to have my surname, but a fairly well-known scout and executive who has worked for the Expos, Mariners, Diamondbacks and Blue Jays also has it.
    Bob Didier

  16. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Reds5 View Post
    Chris Bando
    Yup.
    Quote Originally Posted by Macker View Post
    Bob Didier
    Yep.

    More:

    1. I spent two years in the big leagues. My first one wasn't that bad - I had a 162 OPS+ with the Braves. But my second was terrible. I split that year between the Braves and Cardinals, having been traded partway through the year for minor leaguer Anton French. I was a Dominican third baseman. I played in 1994 and 1995. I died in a car accident in 1997.

    2. My year of futility came in 2007. I spent most of my career with the Reds, but I also played for the Royals and Cardinals. I actually had some pop, hitting over 10 home runs a year from 2001 to 2005. I was once kicked in the head by a Cincinnati Reds pitcher.

    3. My year of futility came in 2008. Like many of these guys, I was/am a catcher. I spent my entire big league career with Houston. Technically I'm still active, having played in indy ball, and briefly in the Rangers organization, in 2014.

    4. My year of futility came in 2010. I am one of only two guys on this list afforded more than 200 at-bats to totally suck up the place. I played for the Angels for most of my career, but also had a stint with Pittsburgh. My failure at the big league level came as something of a surprise - I always tore up the minors and was twice named a Top 10 prospect by Baseball America.

    5. My year of futility came in 2011. I've spent my entire career with the same team, an inhabitant of the AL West. I played with them in 2014. I came into my own in 2012, knocking over 30 doubles, adding nearly 20 home runs and stealing over 20 bases. Unfortunately, I strike out a lot.
    Last edited by Cowtipper; 11-04-2014 at 04:15 AM.

  17. #17
    2. My year of futility came in 2007. I spent most of my career with the Reds, but I also played for the Royals and Cardinals. I actually had some pop, hitting over 10 home runs a year from 2001 to 2005. I was once kicked in the head by a Cincinnati Reds pitcher.
    Jason LaRue

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cowtipper View Post
    ^^^this guy knows his baseball, too.
    Just my baseball cards from a certain limited time frame.

  19. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Cowtipper View Post
    1. I spent two years in the big leagues. My first one wasn't that bad - I had a 162 OPS+ with the Braves. But my second was terrible. I split that year between the Braves and Cardinals, having been traded partway through the year for minor leaguer Anton French. I was a Dominican third baseman. I played in 1994 and 1995. I died in a car accident in 1997.
    The years and the death clue give it away for me: Jose Oliva.

    3. My year of futility came in 2008. Like many of these guys, I was/am a catcher. I spent my entire big league career with Houston. Technically I'm still active, having played in indy ball, and briefly in the Rangers organization, in 2014.
    J.R. Towles? I remember him being a pretty bad-hitting catcher for the Astros.

    4. My year of futility came in 2010. I am one of only two guys on this list afforded more than 200 at-bats to totally suck up the place. I played for the Angels for most of my career, but also had a stint with Pittsburgh. My failure at the big league level came as something of a surprise - I always tore up the minors and was twice named a Top 10 prospect by Baseball America.
    Brandon Wood? I'm pretty sure that was the guy's name. If I recall, he won the starting third baseman's job out of Spring Training, and due to his minor league track record, everyone figured he was a sure thing, but he ended up being a disaster.

  20. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Reds5 View Post
    Jason LaRue
    Quote Originally Posted by ian2813 View Post
    The years and the death clue give it away for me: Jose Oliva.



    J.R. Towles? I remember him being a pretty bad-hitting catcher for the Astros.



    Brandon Wood? I'm pretty sure that was the guy's name. If I recall, he won the starting third baseman's job out of Spring Training, and due to his minor league track record, everyone figured he was a sure thing, but he ended up being a disaster.
    All correct.

    And hints for the final three of that first list:

    1. My year of futility came in 2011. I've spent my entire career with the same team, an inhabitant of the AL West. I played with them in 2014. I came into my own in 2012, knocking over 30 doubles, adding nearly 20 home runs and stealing over 20 bases. Unfortunately, I strike out a lot. I am outfielder with the Mariners.

    2. My year of futility came in 2013. I began my big league career in 2008 with the Pirates, but also played for the Brewers, Dodgers and Yankees. In 2002, I was traded from the Red Sox to the Padres for Cesar Crespo. My most significant playing time came the Dodgers in 2012.

    3. I'm a power hitting second baseman who has played for the Marlins, Braves and Giants. I have been an All-Star three times. I hit 36 home runs in 2011.

  21. #21
    Mike Saunders
    Dan Ugla
    Last edited by Reds5; 11-05-2014 at 03:47 AM.

  22. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by Reds5 View Post
    Mike Saunders
    Dan Ugla
    Well done.

    More hints:

    1. My year of futility came in 2013. I began my big league career in 2008 with the Pirates, but also played for the Brewers, Dodgers and Yankees. In 2002, I was traded from the Red Sox to the Padres for Cesar Crespo. My most significant playing time came the Dodgers in 2012. I share my first name with someone already on this list. I share my surname with a baseball family (though I'm not related) with a famous member who had considerable success with Houston in the 1970s and 1980s.

    2. I'm a defensively gifted second baseman who spent the first part of my career with the Athletics. I've also played for the Dodgers, Rockies and Cardinals. I've led my league's second basemen in fielding percentage twice.

    3. I began my career with Texas in 2013, but have spent most of my time with the White Sox. I have decent speed.

    4. I was a 39-year-old catcher in 2014. I've played in many cities, though I've only spent one year in the NL. I was once traded for a minor leaguer named Jeff Kennard.

    5. I'm a second baseman who is from Louisville, KY. When I was with the Braves, I wore #26. I led the NL in errors by a 2B twice.
    Last edited by Cowtipper; 11-05-2014 at 10:16 PM.

  23. #23
    2. I'm a defensively gifted second baseman who spent the first part of my career with the Athletics. I've also played for the Dodgers, Rockies and Cardinals. I've led my league's second basemen in fielding percentage twice.
    Mark Ellis?

    5. I'm a second baseman who is from Louisville, KY. When I was with the Braves, I wore #26. I led the NL in errors by a 2B twice.
    Brooks Conrad?

  24. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by ian2813 View Post
    Mark Ellis?



    Brooks Conrad?
    Correct, incorrect. The second guy wore #6 when he played with the Marlins. He was once traded for for Mike Dunn and Omar Infante.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cowtipper View Post
    5. I'm a second baseman who is from Louisville, KY. When I was with the Braves, I wore #26. I led the NL in errors by a 2B twice.
    That's Uggla.
    People ask me what I do in winter when there's no baseball. I'll tell you what I do. I stare out the window and wait for spring. -Rogers Hornsby

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