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Thread: Hall of Famer with the most minor league home runs

  1. #1

    Hall of Famer with the most minor league home runs

    Just wondering, which Hall of Famer has the most minor league home runs? Which Hall of Fame pitcher has the most minor league wins?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cowtipper View Post
    Which Hall of Fame pitcher has the most minor league wins?
    I know that Grove was held back
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    I think Dazzy Vance was as well.

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    According to the BB-Ref Bullpen, Hector Espino leads the minors in career HR with 484, and Bill Thomas leads the minors in career pitching wins with 383. I know they're not HOFers, but it's still interesting. Working on finding out the records for HOFers.
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  5. #5
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    Top 10 HOFers in career minor league HRs:

    HTML Code:
    Player          HR
    Walter Alston  176
    Tony Lazzeri   135
    Willie McCovey 105
    Tony Perez      97
    Willard Brown   95
    Joe Gordon      91
    Dick Williams   90
    Joe Medwick     83
    Johnny Mize     81
    Earl Averill    80
    And in minor league pitching wins:

    HTML Code:
    Pitcher           W
    Joe McGinnity   207
    Tom Lasorda     136
    Stan Coveleski  133
    Dazzy Vance     133
    Lefty Grove     111
    Hoyt Wilhelm    109
    Jesse Haines    107
    Chief Bender     94
    Burleigh Grimes  86
    Mordecai Brown   85
    The data is from BB-Ref and is incomplete particularly for 19th century minor league teams, but these are the totals I got.
    Last edited by Nerdlinger; 04-24-2010 at 10:56 PM.
    *** Submit your personal HOF as your ballot for the Single Ballot BBF Hall of Fame! *** Also: Buck the Fraves!

  6. #6
    Wow, thanks DJC!

  7. #7
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    good question my guess would be harmon killebrew.

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    I've got Luke Easter with 269 minor league home runs, the last hit when he was 47 or 48 years old. http://www.baseball-reference.com/mi...d=easter001lus

    Right, and he isn't in the Hall of Fame... he just should be.
    Last edited by Gee Walker; 04-25-2010 at 05:57 PM. Reason: Easter isn't an official HOF player...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cowtipper View Post
    Wow, thanks DJC!
    No prob. I found it interesting how managers like Alston and Lasorda stood out for their play in the minors but not so much in the majors. Lazzeri benefited from the exceedingly long PCL seasons, whacking 60 HR in 197 games in 1925.
    *** Submit your personal HOF as your ballot for the Single Ballot BBF Hall of Fame! *** Also: Buck the Fraves!

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    Quote Originally Posted by statman View Post
    good question my guess would be harmon killebrew.
    Killebrew deubted in the majors at age 18. Though he did hit 63 HRs in the minors.
    Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

  11. #11
    The ones that stand out to me on those lists are McCovey and Perez. If they had hit about 50 of those HR in the majors instead of the minors........

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Gee Walker View Post
    I've got Luke Easter with 269 minor league home runs, the last hit when he was 47 or 48 years old. http://www.baseball-reference.com/mi...d=easter001lus

    Right, and he isn't in the Hall of Fame... he just should be.
    Why is this?

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    Looking at Buzz Arlett, who had 432 minor league homers (his was the record broken by Espino). He played one season in the majors, hit .313, 18, 72- 5th in the league in slugging at .538, fourth in homers. His avg, spct., homers, and tb are records for one year major leaguers. Apparently his fielding wasn't so hot, but let's face it- he was playing with the Phillies and it was 1931 when they were a perennial candidate for the cellar. Why would they put him on waivers at the end of the season? He was the second best hitter on the team after Chuck Klein, and though Baker Bowl was a hitter's paradise, Arlett only hit six points better at home than away, and slugged 35 better, and he played a bunch more games on the road then at home for some reason. He was a switch hitter and after hitting .408 for the month of May, the only month he started regularly was July. Was he injured somehow? Or what was the deal? He was replaced the next year by Kiddo Davis, who was pretty good and a better fielder, but Arlett could've been a hitting star it seems.

    Heck, if Smead Jolley could last four years in the majors with abysmal fielding, Arlett should've stayed longer. Or does anyone have any more info on why the Phils put him on waivers? The next year in Baltimore he hit .339, 54, 144.

  14. #14
    He broke his thumb in June.

    https://news.google.com/newspapers?n...,6016652&hl=en

    He wanted to play in the majors in 1932 (and beyond one would imagine), but apparently that didn't happen. The Orioles of the International League "secured him from the Phillies" (in a trade, apparently) following the 1931 campaign, but he refused to sign until he earned a major league salary.

    https://news.google.com/newspapers?n...,2053306&hl=en

    According to this, he didn't get signed by a big league club because of his slow start in 1931 and tendency to start seasons slowly. Major league teams didn't want a slow starter in those high-offense 30s, apparently.

    https://news.google.com/newspapers?n...6,305680&hl=en
    Last edited by Cowtipper; 05-20-2015 at 06:05 PM.

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Nerdlinger View Post
    Top 10 HOFers in career minor league HRs:

    HTML Code:
    Player          HR
    Walter Alston  176
    Tony Lazzeri   135
    Willie McCovey 105
    Tony Perez      97
    Willard Brown   95
    Joe Gordon      91
    Dick Williams   90
    Joe Medwick     83
    Johnny Mize     81
    Earl Averill    80
    And in minor league pitching wins:

    HTML Code:
    Pitcher           W
    Joe McGinnity   207
    Tom Lasorda     136
    Stan Coveleski  133
    Dazzy Vance     133
    Lefty Grove     111
    Hoyt Wilhelm    109
    Jesse Haines    107
    Chief Bender     94
    Burleigh Grimes  86
    Mordecai Brown   85
    The data is from BB-Ref and is incomplete particularly for 19th century minor league teams, but these are the totals I got.
    Well, that sure made it fun to guess! Thanks a lot.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cowtipper View Post
    He broke his thumb in June.

    https://news.google.com/newspapers?n...,6016652&hl=en

    He wanted to play in the majors in 1932 (and beyond one would imagine), but apparently that didn't happen. The Orioles of the International League "secured him from the Phillies" (in a trade, apparently) following the 1931 campaign, but he refused to sign until he earned a major league salary.

    https://news.google.com/newspapers?n...,2053306&hl=en

    According to this, he didn't get signed by a big league club because of his slow start in 1931 and tendency to start seasons slowly. Major league teams didn't want a slow starter in those high-offense 30s, apparently.

    https://news.google.com/newspapers?n...6,305680&hl=en
    Thanks, 'Tipper. Great articles- love old newspapers. Thinking about minor league stars right now I'm thinking about Perry Werden, who had the organized baseball home run record before Ruth with 45 in a season. There should be a book about him. He broke in as a pitcher in the UA, going 12-1, was in the minors for a few years and returned to the majors in 1890, playing four seasons in the AA and NL as a slugging first baseman, leading the league in triples two of those four years with a high of 29. Apparently, St. Louis wouldn't pay him what he wanted so he went to the Minneapolis Millers and their bandbox of a stadium, where in 1894 he hit .416 with 43 homers and in 1895 topped that going .428 with 45 (he won the 1895 batting title but was fifth in 1894 as baseball was going offense crazy). In 1896 they moved to a bigger park but he still led the league with 18 homers and hit .377, also leading the league with 18 triples (he was also a speedster- which explains some of his triples power throughout his career). Back in the majors in 1897 he had his only .300 season in the majors (.301), broke his leg in the off season, missed 1898 entirely, and was out of the majors for good, returning to Minneapolis as player manager, and as the Western League became the American League in 1900 (but still a minor league), he led the league in homers and slugging. He remained in the minors when the AL went major, still a star.

    He was one of the most colorful players of a colorful era. Here's a Good Ruthian story about Werden: For Des Moines in 1901, he was in a park that ground rule restrictions. He hit a ball over the left field fence and the umpire stopped him on second for a double. So he hit o ne over the right field fence and got another double. Finally, late in the game, he hit one over the center field fence- which was the only way you got a homer- and he was trotting around the bases, he said to the ump "let's see what you can do with that one."

    Fascinating character.

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