Page 4 of 48 FirstFirst ... 2345614 ... LastLast
Results 61 to 80 of 947

Thread: Cowtipper's deaths thread

  1. #61
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    18,592

    Red Borom

    Edward J. (Red) Borom passed away
    on 01-07-2011.

    Visitation is Tues-day, January 11, at 1:00 PM
    at Laurel Land Funeral Home, 6000 South RL.
    Thorton, Dallas, TX., followed by memorial
    services beginning at 2:00 PM.

    Red was a professional baseball player from
    1935-1950. He played for the Detroit Tigers
    in 1944-1945 and was a member of the 1945
    World Series Champions. He once got four
    hits in a game against Bob Feller. Red also
    played on two semi-pro National Champions,
    Sinton Oil and Boeing.
    Read more:

    http://groups.google.com/group/alt.o...0f626083a8899#

  2. #62
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    18,592

    Jose Vidal

    [TRANSLATED]Jos Vidal Nicol s, who was one of the great
    Dominican baseball players, died Friday.
    Nicolas Vidal was suffering from cancer for
    some time and Death won the battle. He died
    in Health Square.

    Born in Batey Lettuce, Nicolas Vidal played
    with four Dominican teams (Chosen, Licey,
    Aguilas Eastern Star) and was signed
    for professional baseball in 1958.

    He played in the majors with the Cleveland
    Indians.
    Read more:

    http://groups.google.com/group/alt.o...b692c006ed19d#
    Last edited by Cowtipper; 01-10-2011 at 06:39 PM.

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    18,592

    Francisco de la Rosa

    Sorry, but it's in Spanish.

    Después de varios años aquejado de salud falleció el jueves el ex-lanzador de Grandes Ligas y las Estrellas Orientales el derecho Francisco De La Rosa, en la ciudad de Baltimore del estado de Maryland.

    Así lo informó su hermano Gustavo (Jehová), quien agregó que el cuerpo fue cremado anoche mismo a las 12:00 de la noche en un hospital de esta ciudad.

    De La Rosa estuvo residiendo por varios años en la ciudad de Nueva York luego de su retiro del béisbol organizado hace varios años.

    Aunque se mantenía jugando en las ligas independientes de los Estados Unidos, se mudó a la ciudad de Filadelfia y posteriormente vino a vivir con sus hermanos a la ciudad de Baltimore.
    Read more:

    http://webcache.googleusercontent.co...sco-de-la-Rosa

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Florissant, Mo.
    Posts
    25,332
    When I first saw the tread, I thought it said "Cowtipper's Death Threats." Whew! This is lot better. I mean I know that Cowtipper's HOF threads are controversial, but really???
    1885 1886 1926 1931 1934 1942 1944 1946 1964 1967 1982 2006 2011

    1887 1888 1928 1930 1943 1968 1985 1987 2004 2013

    1996 2000 2001 2002 2005 2009 2012 2014 2015


    The Top 100 Pitchers In MLB History
    The Top 100 Position Players In MLB History

  5. #65
    Quote Originally Posted by STLCards2 View Post
    When I first saw the tread, I thought it said "Cowtipper's Death Threats." Whew! This is lot better. I mean I know that Cowtipper's HOF threads are controversial, but really???
    Been thinking that. Didn't want to say it . . .
    Dave Bill Tom George Mark Bob Ernie Soupy Dick Alex Sparky
    Joe Gary MCA Emanuel Sonny Dave Earl Stan
    Jonathan Neil Roger Anthony Ray Thomas Art Don
    Gates Philip John Warrior Rik Casey Tony Horace
    Robin Bill Ernie JEDI

  6. #66
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    18,592

    Roy Hartsfield

    HARTSFIELD, Roy Roy Thomas Hartsfield October 25, 1925 - January 15, 2011 Roy T. Hartsfield of Ellijay passed away at his daughter's home in Ball Ground, GA, on Saturday, January 15. He was preceded in death by his wife of 60 years, Alice Young Hartsfield. Born in Chattahoochee, Georgia, he attended West Fulton High School. He spent over forty years in professional baseball. After high school, he was signed by the Atlanta Crackers where he played the 1943 season followed by 2 years in the Navy at Great Lakes. His major league playing days were with the Boston Braves for three years, 1950 ñ 1952. He then spent many years in the Los Angeles Dodgers organization where he managed in their minor league system and coached on the major league level. He also coached for the Atlanta Braves then went on to manage the Hawaii Islanders for 4 years. He was the first ever manager of the Toronto Blue Jays in the American League expansion in 1976 where he managed for 3 years. Recognized for his in-depth knowledge of the game, he was selected to lead instructional leagues in Germany and Japan while with the Dodgers. After retirement from baseball, Roy and Alice moved to Ellijay which quickly became their home. For many years, he was an active member of the Lions Club and served as Grand Marshal of the Ellijay Apple Festival one year. He became a member of the "Creepy Crawlers" golf group and spent many a fine day on the course at Whitepath with his buddies, frequently winning 'closest to the pin'. Throughout his retirement, he played in many charity golf tournaments through the Major League Baseball Players Alumni organization. Before his health forced him to quit golf, he was still shooting his age in his eighties. He leaves behind many good friends in the Ellijay community which he loved. He is survived by his daughters, Karol (Len) Little of Ball Ground, Patti Hartsfield of Vinings, Linda (Larry) Korb of Cumming, grandchildren and great-grandchildren.
    Read more:

    http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/atl...6618&fhid=5288

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Azle, TX
    Posts
    191
    Former Phillies and Dodgers Coach Carroll Beringer
    Former Fort Worth Cat pitcher Carroll Beringer, who was a fixture at the new LaGrave Field for the past decade, passed away Monday at the age of 82.

    Beringer pitched for the Cats in the 1940's and 1950's before going on to coach for the Los Angeles Dodgers and Philadelphia Phillies. In 2006, Beringer, Carl Erskine and Bobby Bragan become the first inductees into the Cats’ Legend of LaGrave Hall of Fame.

    After the Cats were brought back to life in Fort Worth in 2001, Beringer spent many game nights at LaGrave Field, interacting with fans and telling stories of the history of the franchise that he experienced.

  8. #68
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    18,592

    Gus Zernial

    Gus Zernial, the former major league slugger who settled in Clovis after his 11-year career ended and became a sports broadcaster and one of the Fresno Grizzlies' biggest advocates, died Thursday after a long illness.

    He was 87.

    Mr. Zernial died at a Fresno hospice care center from the effects of congestive heart failure, said his daughter, Lisa Pearlstein.
    Read more:

    http://thedeadballera.com/passings.html

  9. #69
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    18,592

    George Crowe

    George Crowe's place in history was cemented when he won the first Indianapolis Star Indiana Mr. Basketball honor while playing for Franklin High School in 1939.

    Yet he continued to have mixed feelings about it up until his death earlier this week, a nephew said.

    "He was very proud that he was selected as the first Mr. Basketball, but it was a bittersweet time for him because his team lost to Frankfort (in the state championship game)," said Brad Crowe, New Castle.

    "For him to take personal glory at that point in time was not his style. He always said he would have much rather won the state championship and someone else be Mr. Basketball."

    George Crowe died near Sacramento, Calif., on Tuesday night. He was 89 and had been residing in an assisted living facility. His health had deteriorated in recent years after a series of strokes, Brad Crowe said.
    Read more:

    http://thedeadballera.com/passings.html

  10. #70
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    18,592

    Perry Currin

    Perry Gilmore Currin, 82, died of heart failure Monday, January 17, at his home in San Antonio, Texas. He leaves his loving wife of 52 years, Vi Currin, his children Diane Sowell, Sherry Fox, and Chris Currin, ten grandchildren, and many close friends. Mr. Currin was born on September 27, 1928 in Washington, D.C. to Thadeous and Dorothy Currin. He played baseball for a short time with the St. Louis Browns in 1947; at 18, he was one of the youngest players to ever sign in the Major League at the time. His time with the Browns was followed by a short career in the minor leagues. He met is wife, Vi Stasko, in Washington D.C., and they were married in August of 1958. After many moves on account of work and family, he and his wife settled in San Antonio. Mr. Currin was an active and enthusiastic member of the Knights of Columbus, and a Eucharistic minister at St. Mary's Catholic Church in downtown San Antonio. He enjoyed golfing with friends and spending time with family. He was a loving husband, and extremely proud of his children and grandchildren, who brought him great joy. A man of great humility, Mr. Currin never thought of himself as someone special, but he was, nonetheless, special to all who knew him. His quick wit often brought smiles to the faces of those around him. He will be greatly missed. His memorial service will be held Saturday, February 5, 9 AM, at St. Mary's Catholic Church in San Antonio.
    http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/san...&pid=148079275

  11. #71
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    18,592

    Ron Piche

    Montreal – It is with heavy hearts that we announce the passing of 1988 inductee Ron Piché earlier this afternoon. The Quebec baseball legend lost a lengthy battle with complications from cancer. Following his outstanding career the hard throwing right-hander became a scouting director with the Montreal Expos and became such an ambassador that he earned the nickname “Monsieur Baseball.”

    Piché, 75, is survived by Helené, his partner of 20 years, his daughter Christine, his son Luc, and his grandson Jonathan.

    “Ron was and will remain a true baseball icon in Canada, because he was a gentleman who represented everything that is great about the game and the industry,” said Ball Hall president & CEO Tom Valcke.

    “His passion and pride for Canadiana were second to none. Everybody loved Ron Piché! As far as being a supporter of what we do here, it was never more evident than when he suffered a terrible automobile accident on his way to St. Marys two years ago to attend the induction ceremony, and when he was being removed from his vehicle by the emergency crew using the jaws of life, he asked them to please not damage the Hall of Fame blazer that he was wearing. He will be dearly missed but will always serve as an inspiration to all of us.”

    The young French Canadian, following an extended minor league career where he compiled 130 wins and a 2.96 ERA, made his major league debut on May 30, 1960 with the Milwaukee Braves, suiting up alongside Hank Aaron, Warren Spahn and Eddie Mathews. The Verdun, Quebec native notched nine saves that season and continued to be an effective option out of the Braves’ bullpen for the next three seasons. In 1963, he appeared in 37 games and recorded a career-best 3.40 ERA. He also pitched for the California Angels in 1965 and the St. Louis Cardinals in 1966.
    http://www.thedeadballera.com/passings.html

  12. #72
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    18,592

    Woodie Fryman

    Detroit -- A hero of a Tigers' team that nearly went to the World Series has died.
    Woodie Fryman, the left-handed pitcher who gave the 1972 Tigers such a lift in the last two months of their successful drive to win the American League East, died Friday night at St. Joseph Hospital in Lexington, Ky.

    His death was confirmed by Price Brothers Funeral Home in Flemingsburg, Ky, which will handle funeral arrangements.

    Fryman was 70.
    From The Detroit News: http://detnews.com/article/20110205/...#ixzz1D9yWHmi0

  13. #73
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    18,592

    Tony Malinosky

    OXNARD, Calif. — The ballplayer who was the oldest living major leaguer has died at the age of 101.

    Tony Malinosky was an infielder with the Brooklyn Dodgers for three months in 1937. The Los Angeles Dodgers say he died Tuesday in Oxnard, Calif.

    Malinosky hit .228 in 35 games with Brooklyn before his career was cut short by a knee injury. He later served in the Army and fought in the Battle of the Bulge.

    Malinosky was honoured at Dodger Stadium during the 2009 season when he turned 100. The team says he remained a Dodgers fan his whole life.
    http://www.google.com/hostednews/can...?docId=5903605

  14. #74
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    18,592

    Chuck Tanner

    He was one of baseball's nicest guys.

    "Nobody goes through life with a bigger smile, warmer handshake or kinder word than Chuck Tanner," Pittsburgh Post-Gazette columnist Ron Cook once wrote.

    A measure of the man was that the moment of his greatest professional triumph -- leading the 1979 "We are Family" Pittsburgh Pirates to a come-from-behind World Series win -- would take place alongside the pain of his mother's death before Game 5 of the Series, and neither event would be diminished.

    "My mother is a great Pirates fan," Tanner would tell his players before the pivotal game, his team trailing 3-1 in the Series to the vaunted Baltimore Orioles. "She knows we're in trouble, so she went upstairs to get some help."

    Today, some Pirates fans may be looking upstairs for signs of the last Bucs manager to lead the team to a World Series championship. Tanner, age 82, has died. The cause was not disclosed by the Pirates, who announced the news on Friday.

    "The news of Chuck's passing ... was met today with heavy hearts by everyone within the Pirates organization," Pirates president Frank Coonelly said. "Chuck was much more than a highly successful Major League manager who guided the Pirates to the World Series championship in 1979, he was an integral and loved member of the Pirates family, most recently serving as a senior advisor to general manager Neal Huntington. Chuck will be deeply missed by everyone within the Pirates family."

    A native of New Castle, Pa., some 40 miles north of Pittsburgh, Tanner played for eight seasons from 1955-62 with four different teams, the Milwaukee Braves, the Chicago Cubs, Cleveland Indians and Los Angeles Angels.

    He hit a home run in his first career at-bat on April 12, 1955, for the Braves, but his playing career was undistinguished. In parts of nine seasons spent with four teams, Tanner hit. 261 with 21 homers in 396 games.

    He would make his mark, though, as a manager. After leading the Triple-A Hawaii Islanders to a Pacific Coast League pennant in 1970, Tanner landed his first Major League managerial job in September, taking over the Chicago White Sox. He led the White Sox to a second-place finish in 1972 and managed the club through 1975 before taking over the Oakland A's for a season.

    Tanner's stay in Oakland was short-lived, though. He was traded -- yes, traded, for catcher Manny Sanguillen -- to the Pirates after one season by owner Charlie Finley.

    He had found his fit. Tanner guided the Pirates to second-placed finishes in the NL East in 1977 and 1978 before the magical 1979 season, when the team won 98 games without a 15-game winner on the staff.

    His optimism unflinching, Tanner was a player's manager if there ever was one.

    "When things were going well, they didn't need you. But when the guys were going bad, I'd hug them," Tanner said, smiling.

    It was a unique style, to be sure, but an approach that worked best with a close-knit Pirates team, led by Willie Stargell and which adopted the Sister Sledge song, "We are Family" as their anthem for the 1979 season.

    "He was a real rah-rah type of guy," said Ray Zardetto, author and baseball historian. "Sometimes you're lucky and that managerial style works with a team. He was much better off with the guys like Stargell policing the clubhouse themselves."

    Sanguillen, who was reacquired by Pittsburgh, said the manager's optimism was infectious.

    "It was like you knew something good was going to happen because of the way he was always thinking," Sanguillen said. "Everybody loved him and everybody just loved playing for him."

    At what seemed to be the club's bleakest moment, when the death of Tanner's mother cast a pall over a locker room full of men already despondent about being down 3-1 in the World Series, Tanner continued to be a positive influence, reassuring his team that he was all right and his mother was pulling for them.

    The Pirates responded by winning 7-1 that day, and going on to take the final two in Baltimore, becoming the last team to win a Game 7 of the World Series on the road.

    Afterward, Sanguillen told Tanner the team had dedicated the series to his mother. "It made me feel fantastic. Just fantastic," Tanner said years later.

    He would manage the Pirates for six more seasons before taking over the Atlanta Braves from 1986 through 39 games of the 1988 season. His record over 19 seasons as a manager was 1,352-1,381.

    "Chuck spent his life serving baseball in a variety of roles, and I am particularly glad that in recent years he returned to the Pirates, the club with which he will be forever linked," said Commissioner Bud Selig in a statement. "On behalf of Major League Baseball, I extend my deepest sympathy to Chuck's sons and the entire Tanner family, as well as to his many fans in Pittsburgh and throughout our game."

    In later years, Tanner stayed active in the game as a scout. And in 2006, Houston Astros' manager Phil Garner, an infielder on the 1979 Pirates club, honored his former mentor by naming Tanner a National League coach in the 2006 All-Star Game in Pittsburgh.

    When Tanner passed, there was some discrepancy in reports on his age. Some listed him at 81, citing his published date of birth as July 4, 1929. But Tanner was actually born one year earlier. The misprint, Tanner revealed late in life, was the result of the Braves trying to pass him off as one year younger than he actually was when they drafted him out of high school in the late 1940s.

    "I don't know how it happened," Tanner told the Pittsburgh Tribune Review in 2009. "They did that with every one of their players. But they're not the only team. I didn't do it. They did it."

    No matter what his age, Tanner's love for the game -- and life -- was constant.

    "Everyday was a great day," he said. "When we won, we beat the greatest players in the world. The second greatest thing was that you lose because you've had the chance to play against the best players in the world."

    Win or lose, Tanner's love for the game -- and life -- was constant.

    "Every day was a great day," he said. "When we won, we beat the greatest players in the world. The second greatest thing was that you lose because you've had the chance to play against the best players in the world."

    Tanner's son, Bruce, who pitched for the White Sox in 1985, said: "He will forever be remembered as a loving husband, father and grandfather to his family, and a good friend to every life he touched. In baseball we will remember his eternal optimism and his passion for the game."
    http://mlb.mlb.com/news/article.jsp?...s_mlb&c_id=mlb

  15. #75
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    18,592

    Cliff Dapper

    Cliff Dapper, the only player in major league baseball history traded for an announcer died this past week in Los Angeles. He was 91.

    In a brief trial with the Brooklyn Dodgers at the beginning of the 1942 season, Dapper batted an outstanding .471 in in 17 at-bats over eight games. With such a hot start, one wonders why Dapper didn't experience another chance at big league stardom.

    Continue reading on Examiner.com: Cliff Dapper, 91, former Brooklyn Dodger, traded for Ernie Harwell - New York Baseball History | Examiner.com http://www.examiner.com/baseball-his...#ixzz1DyEon7Vs

  16. #76
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    18,592

    Gino Cimoli

    Gino Cimoli, a Dodger outfielder in Brooklyn and Los Angeles who was the first major league batter on the West Coast when the Dodgers and Giants moved to California in 1958, has died. He was 81.

    Cimoli died Saturday at Sutter Roseville Medical Center in Roseville, Calif., of kidney and heart complications, said his longtime companion, Lorraine Vigli.
    http://www.latimes.com/news/obituari...,1752293.story

  17. #77
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    18,592

    Joe Frazier

    Joe Frazier, the manager of the Mets in the turbulent period between the tenures of Yogi Berra and Joe Torre, died Tuesday in Broken Arrow, Okla. He was 88 and a longtime Broken Arrow resident.

    His death was confirmed by the Christian-Gavlik Funeral Home in Broken Arrow.
    Read more:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/18/sp...18frazier.html

  18. #78
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    18,592

    Buddy Lewis

    Gastonia’s John “Buddy” Lewis came to fame as a major league baseball player, rubbing elbows with the likes of Joe DiMaggio and Ted Williams.

    Lewis lived the later chapters of his storied life as a Gaston County businessman with less fanfare, but with no fewer fans.

    The Gastonia native died Friday. He was 94.
    http://www.gastongazette.com/news/ma...membering.html

  19. #79
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    18,592

    Butch McCord (Negro Leaguer)

    "Clinton H. "Butch" McCord, Jr., a former Negro League player and ambassador for baseball, died Thursday at his Nashville home. He was 85.

    McCord played football at Tennessee State and served two years in the Navy during World War II. He became a first baseman and outfielder from 1946-50 for the Nashville Cubs, Nashville Black Vols, Chicago American Giants and Baltimore Elite Giants."
    http://www.tennessean.com/article/20...|text|Sports|p

  20. #80
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    18,592

    Cecil Kaiser (Negro Leaguer)

    Former Negro Leagues star Cecil Kaiser, who became known to many Tigers fans over the years as part of their Negro Leagues tributes, passed away Monday at the age of 94.

    Kaiser's son, Tyrone, told The Associated Press that his father died after a fall Monday at his home in Southfield, Mich., a suburb of Detroit. He moved back to Michigan following a playing career that included pitching success with the Detroit Stars, Motor City Giants, Homestead Grays and Pittsburgh Crawfords in the 1940s and stints in various Latin American leagues.
    http://detroit.tigers.mlb.com/news/a...s_det&c_id=det

Page 4 of 48 FirstFirst ... 2345614 ... LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •