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  • Fred Lynn

    Originally posted by DoubleX
    Lynn: His slugging is 0.117 above his career mark (WOW!)
    In another thread, XX posted the above concerning Fred Lynn's slugging percentage at Fenway vs away from Fenway. At first, I thought that it was unfair to compare what Fred Lynn did at Fenway Park with what he did his entire career. My thinking was that his years in Boston were his peak years. While there is some truth to that, he had some fairly productive years from 1982-88 (his first year away from Boston was '81, but injuries limited him to just 256 AB) and he was much more consistent in the power department. From '75-'80 he averaged 20.3 HR per season (buoyed by his outlier 39 HR campaign of '79), and during the '82-'88 stretch he averaged 22.9 (never hitting more than 25).

    I'm a little foggy on my Fred Lynn history and my question is twofold: Why exactly did Red Sox trade him in January of '81? I know he was a health risk, but I was just wondering if there were any other reasons. Assuming he would have had slightly better numbers had he stayed in Boston (especially his BA and SLG), would that have been enough to get him serious consideration for the HOF?

    Oh btw, feel free to use this thread for anything related to Fred Lynn.
    "I believe in the Church of Baseball. I tried all the major religions and most of the minor ones. I've worshipped Buddha, Allah, Brahma, Vishnu, Siva, trees, mushrooms and Isadora Duncan. I know things. For instance, there are 108 beads in a Catholic rosary and there are 108 stitches in a baseball. When I learned that, I gave Jesus a chance." ~Ron Shelton, from Bull Durham

  • #2
    I don't know why the Sox traded Lynn when they did. He was coming off an injury marred year, but was only a season removed from what was one of his biggest years.

    The trade was a bust for Boston, though...they traded with him Steve Renko for for Frank Tanana, Jim Dorsey, and Joe Rudi.

    You already know that Lynn was solid but unspectacular for the Angels. Renko went 19-10 as a swing man for the Angels over the next two seasons.

    Meanwhile, Tannana went 4-10 in his only year in Boston before leaving as a FA, Rudi hit .180 in 49 games for Boston, before also leaving as a FA and retiring the next year. Doresey appeared in Boston for exactly 8 innings over the next two years (over 4 games, 1 start) before being released.

    So, for Boston, that deal was a total bust!
    Visit my card site at Mike D's Baseball Card Page.

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    • #3
      Lynn did continue on to have a nice career with the Angels, but I wouldn't say that the comparison I made was totally unfair to him. He was traded when he was 29, so he, in theory, should still have had a number of prime years left in him. In looking at his production, he had those two great years with the Red Sox, three good ones and one average year. His performance over the next several years with both the Angels and Orioles was not all that different from the four good and average years he had with the Red Sox - that really seems to be more the kind of hitter he was, with two flukish years in there as well.

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      • #4
        Lynn (and Fisk)

        The reason: The postmark read December 22, 1980. This meant that the envelopes were mailed 2 days after the deadline for tendering contracts, and thus Fred Lynn and Carlton Fisk found themselves free agents.

        While awaiting an arbitrator's ruling on Lynn's and Fisk's claim of free agency, the Red Sox dealt Lynn to California for Tanana, Rudi, and Dorsey. When Fisk left to sign with the White Sox, Boston received nothing in return.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by ThanksTheo
          The reason: The postmark read December 22, 1980. This meant that the envelopes were mailed 2 days after the deadline for tendering contracts, and thus Fred Lynn and Carlton Fisk found themselves free agents.

          While awaiting an arbitrator's ruling on Lynn's and Fisk's claim of free agency, the Red Sox dealt Lynn to California for Tanana, Rudi, and Dorsey. When Fisk left to sign with the White Sox, Boston received nothing in return.
          I'm not sure I understand. Lynn and Fisk both asked for free agency? Were they under different rules then?
          "I believe in the Church of Baseball. I tried all the major religions and most of the minor ones. I've worshipped Buddha, Allah, Brahma, Vishnu, Siva, trees, mushrooms and Isadora Duncan. I know things. For instance, there are 108 beads in a Catholic rosary and there are 108 stitches in a baseball. When I learned that, I gave Jesus a chance." ~Ron Shelton, from Bull Durham

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          • #6
            Facing a possibility of losing Lynn to free agency because of the late postmark‚ the Red Sox traded Lynn and Renko to the Angels for Tanana, Dorsey and Rudi. The Players' Association contended that Lynn, Fisk, and Burleson were free agents because the Red Sox failed to mail their new contracts by the deadline provided for in the Basic Agreement. Lynn, who yearned to return to California, signed a 4-year deal with the Angels and agreed to drop his case. Fisk's case went to arbitration.

            Edit: My personal take on this is that the Red Sox had grown weary of hearing for decades what a bone-headed move they'd made when they unloaded Ruth, and collectively decided they needed to out-bonehead their predecessors.
            (But that's just my opinion.....)
            Last edited by ThanksTheo; 02-20-2007, 10:53 AM.

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