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Schilling -- The Man or The Myth?

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  • Schilling -- The Man or The Myth?

    I had a request today from DoubleX, who has found an interesting article regarding Curt Schilling, and the reputation he "enjoys" among some fellow players. Some controversial issues are brought up, and for that reason he was hesitant to post it here lest he be thought a rabblerouser. I took a look at it and find it pretty interesting, to say the least, and quite worthy of discussion here, and XX has assured me that he in no way means to create trouble here. So, with my blessing, and Flash's too, DoubleX will shortly post the article in this thread. Please remember, he's just the messenger....
    --Annie
    Be civil to all, sociable to many, familiar with few, friend to one, enemy to none. -Benjamin Franklin, statesman, author, and inventor (1706-1790)
    Remember Yellowdog
    ABNY

  • #2
    Thanks Annie, and nice thread title.

    Like Annie said, I came across this article today and it struck me as pretty interesting (and surprising), so I thought I'd see what other people think. This is not meant to be a Red Sox/Yankees thing, but a Curt Schilling thing (who happens to play for the Red Sox, and thus this is forum), so I wanted to see what people thought and/or if people have had these types of impressions about Schilling before?

    Anyway, the article is from GQ and is titled "The 10 Most Hated Athletes" as rated by their peers. So there are players in all the sports on this list (Phil Mickelson was another name I was surprised to see), and as it turns out, Schilling's peers aren't too fond of him, as he ended up placing 4th on the list (there were two other baseball players - Barry Bonds was 2nd and AJ Pierzynski was 9th). Anyway, here's a link to the article, but I've copied the portion about Schilling below.

    “Between the white lines, it’s all real,” says one reporter who has covered Schilling. “But outside the white lines, there’s a huge gap between the man and the image he projects.” Take, for instance, Schilling’s self-glorifying display during Congress’s steroid hearings last March or his absurdly patriotic open letter to America on ESPN.com after 9/11, for which his teammates mocked him on a late-night bus ride with a chorus of “I’m a Yankee Doodle Dandy.” “They know what he’s about,” says the sportswriter. “I’d say a large percentage of them like him—every fifth day. He wears on people.”

    On days he doesn’t pitch, Schilling is notorious for striking TV-ready poses on the dugout stairs. (His manager in Philadelphia, Jim Fregosi, dubbed him Red Light Curt.) “He’s somebody who’s always positioning himself in terms of what’s best for Curt Schilling,” says ESPN’s Pedro Gomez, who described Schilling as “the consummate table for one.” (Speaking of which, Schilling also has a reputation for sneaking into the clubhouse late in games to get a head start on the buffet.)

    So avid is Schilling’s longing for the spotlight that some of his peers raise doubts about his now legendary turn in the 2004 postseason, when he pitched on an ankle tendon that had been sutured in place. During Game 6, cameras cut repeatedly to the bright red stain on Schilling’s sock. It was blood, right? “The Diamondbacks people think he definitely doctored that sock,” says the sportswriter. The ex-teammate laughs: “All around baseball, people questioned that. It was funny how the stain didn’t spread.”

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    • #3
      For what it's worth, I saw the World Series bloody sock at the HOF last spring, and though it was behind glass, and I'm no forensic expert (though I watch them on TV ), it looked like real blood to me. I also don't see how a man can convincingly fake a limp like that (thinking of him running out onto the field at Busch Stadium).

      Having said that, I often wish we could just tape his mouth shut.
      --Annie
      Be civil to all, sociable to many, familiar with few, friend to one, enemy to none. -Benjamin Franklin, statesman, author, and inventor (1706-1790)
      Remember Yellowdog
      ABNY

      Comment


      • #4
        Also, I just noticed that there is Honorable Mention section to the article with 5 athletes including the following 3 baseball players: Jeff Kent, Randy Johnson, and Alex Rodriguez.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by VTSoxFan
          For what it's worth, I saw the World Series bloody sock at the HOF last spring, and though it was behind glass, and I'm no forensic expert (though I watch them on TV ), it looked like real blood to me. I also don't see how a man can convincingly fake a limp like that (thinking of him running out onto the field at Busch Stadium).

          Having said that, I often wish we could just tape his mouth shut.
          I was at the Hall of Fame in September and I made a point to stay away from that case. Though I did get a good picture of Aaron Boone's bat.

          Comment


          • #6
            I can imagine it wouldn't be your favorite exhibit. I understand, as I would take pains to avoid The Bat That Broke Tim Wakefield's Heart. It was, you understand, quite a shrine for me. The exhibit was kind of hard to see through the fingerprints, nose prints and lip prints on the glass. (not mine! ick ick ick)
            --Annie
            Be civil to all, sociable to many, familiar with few, friend to one, enemy to none. -Benjamin Franklin, statesman, author, and inventor (1706-1790)
            Remember Yellowdog
            ABNY

            Comment


            • #7
              As an athlete, I think he was great. Especially with that game where his sock was soaked with blood. He just went on.

              But as a person... Nah! Big mouth. Big ego. Sometimes I get the impression, that he thinks he's the center of the universe.

              Although I must say that sometimes he has some humour too. During the 2001 World Series, he commented the "Mystique and Aura" signs as: Two night club dancers.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by yankees rule
                As an athlete, I think he was great. Especially with that game where his sock was soaked with blood. He just went on.
                Did you read the excerpt about Schilling? Some players think that the bloody sock was a hoax.

                You know, thinking back to that game, I think I thought then that it seemed kind of suspicious. I mean, Fox couldn't stop focusing on it, and whenever does a tv camera focus on a players feet? They had to have some reason to go there, and it was probably because at some point, Schilling told someone with Fox, "hey look, I'm injured, see my bloody sock." I guess drastic times call for drastic measures. Everyone wants to praise Schilling's postseason heroics in that series, but everyone seems to forget just how badly he got shelled in the first game - 3 IP, 6 hits, 6 ER. And then of course, the image of the bloody sock replaces the image of Schilling crying in the dugout after he got yanked in Game 1.

                Anyway, I hoped Schilling thanked his teammates for getting him that opportunity at redemption in that series.
                Last edited by DoubleX; 01-26-2006, 05:45 PM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by DoubleX
                  Did you read the excerpt about Schilling? Some players think that the bloody sock was a hoax.

                  You know, thinking back to that game, I think I thought then that it seemed kind of suspicious. I mean, Fox couldn't stop focusing on it, and whenever does a tv camera focus on a players feet? They had to have some reason to go there, and it was probably because at some point, Schilling told someone with Fox, "hey look, I'm injured, see my bloody sock." I guess drastic times call for drastic measures. Everyone wants to praise Schilling's postseason heroics in that series, but everyone seems to forget just how badly he got shelled in the first game - 3 IP, 6 hits, 6 ER. And then of course, the image of the bloody sock replaces the image of Schilling crying in the dugout after he got yanked in Game 1.

                  Anyway, I hoped Schilling thanked his teammates for getting him that opportunity at redemption in that series.
                  I did read this. But I can't believe that someone would do something like that. Not even Schilling.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by yankees rule
                    I did read this. But I can't believe that someone would do something like that. Not even Schilling.
                    Well it sounds like he has a reputation of posing for the media, so who knows.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Schilling also has a reputation for sneaking into the clubhouse late in games to get a head start on the buffet.
                      What's wrong with that?
                      "I think about baseball when I wake up in the morning. I think about it all day and I dream about it at night. The only time I don't think about it is when I'm playing it."
                      Carl Yastrzemski

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        My two cents

                        Schilling should pay attention to his pitching, not politics. If he wants to show off military gear, join up. Tape over mouth is good idea.

                        I have uneasy feeling he plans to go into politics when finished with baseball. I hope not. However, if he and Tom Brady ran against each other, that would be entirely appropriate.

                        I don't know about the Sock. I do know about the WORLD SERIES. For me, anyone remotely connected to that gets cut a lot of slack.

                        Except Derek Lowe, who told his wife to find another place to live; while she was in Boston and kids, and end of school year, he moved his s*** in. Glad to say wife won.
                        Varitek=Future Red Sox Manager
                        Boston Boxer - a Real Hero

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by VTSoxFan
                          I had a request today from DoubleX, who has found an interesting article regarding Curt Schilling, and the reputation he "enjoys" among some fellow players. Some controversial issues are brought up, and for that reason he was hesitant to post it here lest he be thought a rabblerouser. I took a look at it and find it pretty interesting, to say the least, and quite worthy of discussion here, and XX has assured me that he in no way means to create trouble here. So, with my blessing, and Flash's too, DoubleX will shortly post the article in this thread. Please remember, he's just the messenger....
                          What's stopped him before?

                          I read that crap yesterday. One thing to keep in mind is that it was part of a "Top 5 most hated Athletes" article from some fashion magazine (GQ?). So obviously they're going to give you reasons for hating him. What do you expect?!?!?!?!?!?

                          I concede that he's a media whore, but because of 2004 I'll cut him some slack. Until he pulls a Damon, the guy gets a free pass from me.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by DoubleX
                            or his absurdly patriotic open letter to America on ESPN.com after 9/11, for which his teammates mocked him on a late-night bus ride with a chorus of “I’m a Yankee Doodle Dandy.”
                            What's so absurdly patriotic about the letter? I thought it was very good; the US had just been attacked, and I think his letter could only have helped the counrty in the wake of the tragedy.

                            I think most of this dislike of Schilling stems from his support of George Bush in the 2004 presidential campaign. However, what I would like to know is why there was little criticism of Carlos Delgado for (previously) refusing to stand for God Bless America as a form of opposition to the war in Iraq. Both athletes are making a political statement, but only one (Schilling) seems to have taken heat for it from the media and the fans. Could it be that some people only support freedom of speech when they agree with what the speaker has to say?

                            I'm not trying to make this into a political matter, but I think it's interesting to see how different Schilling and Delgado have been treated, even though what they have done (use their fame as a way to express their ideas) is very similar, albeit from different sides of the political spectrum.
                            "Too many pitchers, that's all, there are just too many pitchers Ten or twelve on a team. Don't see how any of them get enough work. Four starting pitchers and one relief man ought to be enough. Pitch 'em every three days and you'd find they'd get control and good, strong arms."

                            -Cy Young

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by pesky6
                              I read that crap yesterday. One thing to keep in mind is that it was part of a "Top 5 most hated Athletes" article from some fashion magazine (GQ?). So obviously they're going to give you reasons for hating him. What do you expect?!?!?!?!?!?
                              I actually watched Game 6 the other day. All I can say is that for those of you who have it, re-watch it. Way too many involved with this deal for it to have been a hoax. Many agree that duct tape across his lips would be desirable at times. But, when he first spoke to the Fox reporter immediately following the game, all he said was he was glad he got the second opportunity to pitch and how unbelievable his teammates were. Also, Francona said he was struggling and almost pulled him after four innings. He may have a mouth, but he was the real deal on the field. I hope he can be again for another year or two.

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