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  • What if.....

    What if the Braves never left Boston and were still here to this day,what would the baseball scene in Boston and the rest of New England be like?

  • #2
    I would believe it would be more split in fans but it is almost impossible to know what it would be really like. Because the Braves could be the worst team in the natinol leaugue or the best. Everything could be completley diffrent. And you would think there would be more red sox fans cause there was more BoSox fans when the boston braves were around but who knows.
    go sox.

    Pigskin-Fever

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    • #3
      I might actually be able to purchase good tickets to a game. It might have made the Red Sox more competitive so they wouldn't lose fans and viewers to the NL team.

      With all the ML teams close to selling out all 81 home games you wonder if they could support a second ML team as well?
      "He's tougher than a railroad sandwich."
      "You'se Got The Eye Of An Eagle."

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      • #4
        Well, when the Braves left in 1952, they were severely lacking in attendance, largely because most fans wanted to see ted williams hit home runs than see warren spahn strike out batters. However, had the Braves stayed in Boston, they probably would have attracted a lot more fans because of Hank Aaron, and likely would have given the Braves almost the entire black community in New England as a large portion of their fan base, especially given the Red Sox poor record during the 1950's when it came to race relations.

        My guess is that if the Braves remained in Boston, you would have a situation similar to what you have in NYC with the Yankees and Mets (except on a smaller scale) where much of the population is Red Sox fans, but a large percentage is Braves fans. Whether Boston could have continued to support two teams is still interesting though, because it's entirely possible that the Braves attendance could have stayed low and they wouldn't have been able to afford good players in the free agency era, which could have ultimately led to the team's complete demise.
        "Too many pitchers, that's all, there are just too many pitchers Ten or twelve on a team. Don't see how any of them get enough work. Four starting pitchers and one relief man ought to be enough. Pitch 'em every three days and you'd find they'd get control and good, strong arms."

        -Cy Young

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        • #5
          I personally don't think that Boston has the population to support two teams in today's environment. And even if the city could, the support and passion for the Red Sox would be greatly diluted from what we know it to be.

          I'm guessing that if the Braves didn't leave, the Sox would have left for those attractive pastures out west as was the trend at the time for teams in cities with multiple teams (A's left Philly, Browns left St. Louis, Giants and Dodgers left New York, Senators left D.C. after the Browns/Orioles moved to Baltimore). Manifest destiny was the name of the game at that time. Even teams with strong followings like the Giants and Dodgers couldn't resist that lure of California. Were the Red Sox in the 1950s anymore embedded in the consciousness of Boston than the Dodgers in Brooklyn (which by itself has 4x the population of Boston)? If it could happen to the Dodgers and Giants and As and Senators (these two obviously are not as poignant examples), it could happen to the Red Sox.

          Remember, the Braves from the mid 50s through pretty much the late 60s, were a very competitive team (regularly winning betwen 85-95 games), and the groundwork of that team was laid while the team was in Boston. Had the Braves won their two consecutive pennants and '57 World Series in Boston, the city's loyalty could have definitely been swayed, especially with the star power the Braves had at the time - Aaron, Mathews, Spahn, Burdette, Adcock, Torre, Crandall (things do change - New York went from a Giants to Yankees town; Philly swayed from the A's to Phillies; even the Mets were kings of New York during the 80s and early 90s).

          Then say the Braves don't leave and the Red Sox do at some point around 1960 and the Braves move into Fenway (even though their park has more seating). Imagine how many homeruns Hank Aaron and Eddie Mathews would hit there. It would rival Mantle and Maris as the greatest power show of the time, and certainly would last longer. Boston would be captivated. Perhaps the Braves Boston domination and playing in Fenway leads to more success than the team actually had during that period (much to do with having more resources to use on scouting and signing talent). The difference is enough to give the Braves of that period a few more wins every year, making them perennial contenders for the pennant and even getting them into the Series a few times in the early and mid 60s. And then after that, who knows what happens...Perhaps Joe Torre is riding atop a float down Boylston as a Boston WS MVP.
          Last edited by DoubleX; 03-29-2006, 09:10 PM.

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          • #6
            Its a strange thing, Im willing to say that 99% of New England's population never knew that the Braves were ever here.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by kckid2599
              Its a strange thing, Im willing to say that 99% of New England's population never knew that the Braves were ever here.
              Thats the sad thing about when teams move. They are not rembered for what they have done there. Most people probably dont know about the Philidelphia A's, Washington Senators, St. Louis Browns, and Boston Braves. And in alot of the time the current franchises dont honor those greats from when they were in diffrent citys. Somebody I know says that the Boston Red Sox used to be called the Boston Braves
              go sox.

              Pigskin-Fever

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              • #8
                Originally posted by kckid2599
                Its a strange thing, Im willing to say that 99% of New England's population never knew that the Braves were ever here.
                I think that may be true of the casual fan but the die-hards (like many who are part of RSN) know.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by TonyK
                  I might actually be able to purchase good tickets to a game. It might have made the Red Sox more competitive so they wouldn't lose fans and viewers to the NL team.

                  With all the ML teams close to selling out all 81 home games you wonder if they could support a second ML team as well?
                  I don't think there are that many clubs who even come close to selling out their parks. The Red Sox do, the Cubs come very close (if not all the way), and the Yankees draw well, though they don't sell out every game. The Cardinals will do well since it's their first season in the new park, just like the Phillies did well last year in their new park.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by pesky6
                    I don't think there are that many clubs who even come close to selling out their parks. The Red Sox do, the Cubs come very close (if not all the way), and the Yankees draw well, though they don't sell out every game. The Cardinals will do well since it's their first season in the new park, just like the Phillies did well last year in their new park.
                    The Yankees would probably sell out every game if the stadium was smaller. You gotta remember, Yankee Stadium seats like 25,000 more than Fenway and Wrigley, and 10-15,000 more than most of these new parks springing up.

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