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2012 MLB Draft

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  • 2012 MLB Draft

    The first draft under the new CBA has started yesterday with the first round and the first supplemental round.
    The Red Sox have selected Deven Marrero (SS, ASU) with pick no. 24, Brian Johnson (LHP, Florida) with pick no.31, and Pat Light (RHP, Monmouth).

    The last shortstop, the Sox drafted out of Arizona state, by the way, was a certain Dustin Pedroia.
    Watching Derek Jeter make 40 defensive plays and then watching Adam Everett make 40 defensive plays at the same position is sort of like watching video of Barbara Bush dancing at the White House, and then watching Demi Moore dancing in Striptease. (Bill James)

    Dustin Pedroia doesn't have the strength or bat speed to hit major-league pitching consistently, and he has no power. If he can continue to hit .260 or so, he'll be useful, and he probably has a future as a backup infielder. (Keith Law)

  • #2
    Deven Marrero, Shortstop
    Junior, Arizona State University
    Born: August 25, 1990
    6'1", 194 lbs
    Hits: Right, Throws: Right

    2012 Stats: .284/.340/.436/.776, 4 HR, 33 RBI, 11 of 14 SBs

    - 2012 First Team Pac-12 All-Conference
    - 2012 Golden Spikes Award Preseason Watch List
    - 2011 Pac-10 Defensive Player of the Year
    - 2011 First Team Pac-12 All-Conference
    - 2011 Cape Cod League All-Star
    (info stolen from Soxprospects forum)

    With the 24th pick in the draft, the Red Sox have selected Deven Marrero, a shortstop from Arizona State.

    Marrero, a 6-foot-1, 194 lb. shortstop, was considered the top college position player in the draft after last season’s Cape Cod League. The two-time All Pac-12 selection hit .284/.340/.346 with four home runs and 33 RBI for the Sun Devils this season, a year after hitting .313/.340/.434 as a sophomore.

    After last season, he starred for the Cotuit Kettleers of the Cape Cod League, hitting .326 in 12 games before leaving the Cape to join Team USA. Marrero led Team USA with 19 hits and 14 RBI in 14 games.

    As a freshman at Arizona State—when the old, hitter-friendly aluminum bats were still used—Marrero hit .392/.442/.628 in 37 games. He hit .306 in 29 games for the Kettleers following his freshman campaign in Tempe.

    Defensively, Marrero is projected to stay at shortstop. According to Baseball America, Marrero, who was selected in the 17th round in 2009 by Cincinnati, has performed inconsistently since the NCAA switched to composite bats. He has above-average arm strength and above-average speed, and profiles to have be a gap hitter professionally.

    Under the new collective bargaining agreement, the 24th pick has been allotted $1.75 million towards Boston’s bonus pool. Boston has $6,884,800 allotted for the first ten rounds.
    (from soxprospects.com)

    As a junior in high school, Marrero played on a loaded American Heritage High (Plantation, Fla.) team that included third baseman Nick Castellanos, now with the Tigers, and first baseman Eric Hosmer, now with the Royals. Like Hosmer, Marrero committed to Arizona State, and after he slipped to the 17th round of the 2009 draft he headed to campus. Marrero has always been able to flash the leather, and he is this year’s surest bet to stay at shortstop, with great range, easy actions and above-average arm strength. He shows promise with the bat, but he has been inconsistent this year and was batting .276/.335/.414 over his first 174 at-bats. Marrero has been frustrating for scouts this spring, not just because he has underperformed but because he has looked so nonchalant doing it. Scouts say Marrero has played without energy this year and has shown off his above-average arm strength only when he needs to. He has above-average raw speed but doesn’t always go at full speed on the bases. Marrero shows power in batting practice, but profiles more as a gap hitter at the next level. While there questions about his bat, he still figures to be a first-rounder because there are so few surefire shortstops in the draft.
    (from baseball america)

    Marrero entered the year as a top five prospect, but his struggles at the plate have seen his value drop, in some cases out of the top ten. There have been rumblings that the Pirates would take him at eighth overall, and most of those have come from Keith Law, who has been extremely accurate with his Pirates’ predictions in the last few drafts.

    The best part of Marrero’s game is his defense. He’s got a plus arm, fields the ball smoothly, and reading the ball well off the bat. He also has good range due to his above-average speed. All of this allows Marrero to eventually be a plus defender at the position. He has good plate patience, and has a chance to hit for average power in the future, while currently profiling more as a line drive hitter. However, he hasn’t really shown much at the plate this year.

    It’s debatable whether Marrero would be worth the eighth overall pick. He does have plus defense, which is the bulk of his value right now. He was a consensus top five prospect at the start of the year. If the Pirates believe that his hitting this year is a fluke, then it would make sense to take him, as it is hard to find a shortstop who can hit with the defense that Marrero provides. On the flip side, if Marrero can’t hit, then he doesn’t have much value, as no-bat, strong defensive shortstops can be found much cheaper than the cost of a first round pick.
    (from piratesprospects.com)
    Watching Derek Jeter make 40 defensive plays and then watching Adam Everett make 40 defensive plays at the same position is sort of like watching video of Barbara Bush dancing at the White House, and then watching Demi Moore dancing in Striptease. (Bill James)

    Dustin Pedroia doesn't have the strength or bat speed to hit major-league pitching consistently, and he has no power. If he can continue to hit .260 or so, he'll be useful, and he probably has a future as a backup infielder. (Keith Law)

    Comment


    • #3
      double post. sorry. somehow that's happening a lot lately. Not sure why...
      Last edited by Therwil Flyer; 06-05-2012, 02:22 AM.
      Watching Derek Jeter make 40 defensive plays and then watching Adam Everett make 40 defensive plays at the same position is sort of like watching video of Barbara Bush dancing at the White House, and then watching Demi Moore dancing in Striptease. (Bill James)

      Dustin Pedroia doesn't have the strength or bat speed to hit major-league pitching consistently, and he has no power. If he can continue to hit .260 or so, he'll be useful, and he probably has a future as a backup infielder. (Keith Law)

      Comment


      • #4
        Brian Johnson, left-handed pitcher
        Junior, Florida
        Born: Dec. 7, 1990
        6'3", 235 lbs.
        Throws: left, Hits: left

        2012 Stats: 72 IP, 3.88 ERA, 59 Ks, 15 BBs, .256 OBA

        - 2011 SEC Academic Honor Roll
        - 2011 Semifinalist, John Olerud Two-Way Player of the Year Award
        - 2011 Semifinalist, Dick Howser Award
        - 2011 First Team All-SEC Designated Hitter selection
        (info stolen from soxprospects forum)

        With the 31st overall pick in the draft, the Red Sox have selected Brian Johnson, a left-handed pitcher from the University of Florida.

        Johnson, a 6'3" southpaw was known as one of the top two-way players in the country as he had success both on the mound and at the plate. He went 8-4 with a 3.56 ERA with 68 strikeouts in 86.0 innings pitched. At the plate, Johnson hit .310/.350/.455 with 5 home runs and 40 RBI.

        Known for his control, Johnson throws a 88-91 mph fastball with a slider, curve and changeup. He profiles as a back of the rotation starter who must maintain his penchant for throwing strikes and having solid control in order to be successful.

        Drafted out of Cocoa Beach High School in the 27th round of the 2009 draft by the Los Angeles Dodgers. Johnson pitched for the Yarmouth-Dennis Red Sox in the Cape Cod League last summer, compiling a 2-0 record with a 4.30 ERA and 19 strikeouts and 4 walks in 14.2 innings.

        A two-time member of the USA Collegiate National Team, the hope is that Johnson's will develop further as a pitcher as he focuses his full attention on the mound.

        The slot bonus for the 31st overall pick is $1,575,000. The Red Sox have been given a pool of $6,884,800 for all of their picks in the first ten rounds of the draft.
        (from soxprospects)

        Sawdaye on whether the Sox will develop Johnson — a two-way player who both pitches and plays first at Florida — as a pitcher: “Certainly, he’s a pitcher first for us. He’s definitely very intriguing for us as a first baseman, and part of that plays in our evaluation as a guy that plays two ways. We think there’s some upside there. But he’ll definitely be going out as a lefthanded pitcher for us.”

        Sawdaye on Johnson’s repertoire: “The fastball is at 90-94. He can pitch with a plus fastball, can spin a breaking ball, throws two different breaking balls, obviously has a feel for his changeup, very repeatable delivery and it’s a guy that throws strikes. He has performed in many different levels and is still performing in the College World Series. He’s a guy that we think is super competitive and somebody who’s pitched on the big stage.”
        (from weei)

        Johnson was a latecoming member of the 2009 draft's Top 200 Prospects list, emerging with a strong showing in Sebring, Fla., at the state's high school all-star game. He went to Florida instead of signing and quickly emerged as one of the nation's top two-way players. He led USA Baseball's College National Team with three home runs last summer and draws some interest as a power-hitting first baseman. He's a fairly slow-twitch athlete, though, and profiles better as a durable, big bodied fourth starter. Johnson pitches off an average fastball in the 88-91 mph range, complemented by a slider, curveball and changeup. He throws all four pitches for strikes, with just 42 career walks in his first 219 college innings, and he hides the ball well in his delivery. He gets more swings and misses with his fastball than his velocity and fastball life would seem to merit. Johnson's curveball has its moments as his best secondary pitch, though he doesn't throw it with consistent power. Johnson has good body control despite his modest athleticism and soft body. He's considered a safe, low-upside pick, with some hope that his stuff will become firmer as he focuses 100 percent on pitching.
        (from BA)
        Last edited by Therwil Flyer; 06-05-2012, 02:20 AM.
        Watching Derek Jeter make 40 defensive plays and then watching Adam Everett make 40 defensive plays at the same position is sort of like watching video of Barbara Bush dancing at the White House, and then watching Demi Moore dancing in Striptease. (Bill James)

        Dustin Pedroia doesn't have the strength or bat speed to hit major-league pitching consistently, and he has no power. If he can continue to hit .260 or so, he'll be useful, and he probably has a future as a backup infielder. (Keith Law)

        Comment


        • #5
          Pat Light, RHP
          Junior, Monmouth University
          Born: March 29, 1991
          6'6", 200 lbs
          Hits: Right, Throws: Right

          (info from bleacherreport.com)

          With the 37th overall pick in the draft, the Red Sox have selected Pat Light, a right-handed pitcher from Monmouth University.

          Listed at 6'6'', 200 lb., Light's stock coming into the year largely relied on pure arm strength with a fastball that sits 90-96. However, this season his slider really began to develop according to Baseball America, which lead to him dominating the competition. He finished the season with a 8-3 record, 2.40 ERA, 102 strikeouts and a mere 16 walks over 101.1 innings. His performance earned him Collegiate Baseball/Louisville Slugger All-American Third Team honors.

          The development of the slider along with the 2012 performance elevated his stock and made teams believe that his future could be in the back end of a starting rotation. However, his floor and quicker route to the major leagues could be as a late inning reliever where his fastball would play up even further.

          Light was originally drafted in the 28th round in 2008 by the Minnesota Twins, but the New Jersey native ultimately chose not to sign and to attend in-state Monmouth University.

          The bonus amount for the 37th pick is listed at $1,394,300 leaving open the possibility that Light, a college junior, could sign for less than that and leave the Red Sox with some money to allocate to another 2012 draft pick.
          (from soxprospects)

          Sawdaye on Light’s stuff: “Power pitcher. The fastball, he runs it up there to 97, 98 this year. He’s one of the guys that obviously we scouted on the Cape this past summer in a different role. In the Cape, he was more of a reliever role and obviously came in as a starter this year at Monmouth and got a chance to see extended outings. He’s a guy that we feel like has three pitches, certainly will need to develop a little bit more of a changeup and a breaking ball, but for us, it’s a power fastball that’s one of the best fastballs in the draft.”
          (from weei)

          Pat Light’s sturdy, 6’6” frame draws attention by itself, and he saw his stock shoot up the charts when he touched 96 mph earlier this spring. However, the right-hander struggles to carry his velocity deep into games and often catches too much plate due to lack of movement.

          Light also features an above-average slider and changeup that are borderline show-me pitches at the moment and often ineffective due to a varying and inconsistent arm slot. Still, he’s shown improved command of each of his pitches this season, which aids his projection as a starter rather than a reliever.

          With an enormous but still projectable frame and plus fastball, it’s hard not to compare the right-hander to the Marlins’ Josh Johnson—though the comparison is less accurate when considering their respective secondary offerings. If Light progresses his way through the minors as a starter, he has the potential to make his debut in mid-to-late 2015.
          (from bleacherreport.com)

          Link to ESPN article on Light.
          Last edited by Therwil Flyer; 06-05-2012, 01:58 AM.
          Watching Derek Jeter make 40 defensive plays and then watching Adam Everett make 40 defensive plays at the same position is sort of like watching video of Barbara Bush dancing at the White House, and then watching Demi Moore dancing in Striptease. (Bill James)

          Dustin Pedroia doesn't have the strength or bat speed to hit major-league pitching consistently, and he has no power. If he can continue to hit .260 or so, he'll be useful, and he probably has a future as a backup infielder. (Keith Law)

          Comment


          • #6
            I am a bit underwhelmed by the first day. All three picks seem like signability guys (to some extent). Maybe they have agreements with them that save some money for the today's pick. Then again, I'm not a scout by any means, and only know what I read and hear from others.
            Watching Derek Jeter make 40 defensive plays and then watching Adam Everett make 40 defensive plays at the same position is sort of like watching video of Barbara Bush dancing at the White House, and then watching Demi Moore dancing in Striptease. (Bill James)

            Dustin Pedroia doesn't have the strength or bat speed to hit major-league pitching consistently, and he has no power. If he can continue to hit .260 or so, he'll be useful, and he probably has a future as a backup infielder. (Keith Law)

            Comment


            • #7
              I wonder if Appel has already received a text from Andrew Luck. Wow, Mark must be really pissed right now.
              Last edited by Therwil Flyer; 06-05-2012, 02:33 AM.
              Watching Derek Jeter make 40 defensive plays and then watching Adam Everett make 40 defensive plays at the same position is sort of like watching video of Barbara Bush dancing at the White House, and then watching Demi Moore dancing in Striptease. (Bill James)

              Dustin Pedroia doesn't have the strength or bat speed to hit major-league pitching consistently, and he has no power. If he can continue to hit .260 or so, he'll be useful, and he probably has a future as a backup infielder. (Keith Law)

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Therwil Flyer View Post
                I am a bit underwhelmed by the first day. All three picks seem like signability guys (to some extent). Maybe they have agreements with them that save some money for the today's pick. Then again, I'm not a scout by any means, and only know what I read and hear from others.
                I agree. Hope we have some money left. Johnson has a low ceiling, Marrero could be Iglesias 2.0.
                I know you're watching, Si. Bu.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Video of Marrero:
                  http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...v=M9gie2aDDDw#!
                  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kthKLJoPURE
                  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m8iKFi6bue4

                  Video of Light:
                  http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...v=fi6tLDsEw6g#!
                  Watching Derek Jeter make 40 defensive plays and then watching Adam Everett make 40 defensive plays at the same position is sort of like watching video of Barbara Bush dancing at the White House, and then watching Demi Moore dancing in Striptease. (Bill James)

                  Dustin Pedroia doesn't have the strength or bat speed to hit major-league pitching consistently, and he has no power. If he can continue to hit .260 or so, he'll be useful, and he probably has a future as a backup infielder. (Keith Law)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by SwissRedSoxFan View Post
                    I agree. Hope we have some money left. Johnson has a low ceiling, Marrero could be Iglesias 2.0.
                    Marrero was mentioned as a possible top 10 pick last summer and I'm pretty sure that's not just because of his defense. From what I read, he's a somewhat aggressive hitter with a complicated swing but does possess some pop in his bat.
                    Pat Light could be a stroke of genius or a total bust, only time will tell. Read on another board that therewas at least one other team looking to take him in the supp. round (which would explain why the Red Sox didn't wait longer to take him and use their supp round pick on someone like Eflin).
                    Johnson at 31, I don't get. I assume he will sign below recommended slot, so the Sox have some extra money for the second day.

                    Different rules, different draft. Barnes continues to cruise through high A.
                    Watching Derek Jeter make 40 defensive plays and then watching Adam Everett make 40 defensive plays at the same position is sort of like watching video of Barbara Bush dancing at the White House, and then watching Demi Moore dancing in Striptease. (Bill James)

                    Dustin Pedroia doesn't have the strength or bat speed to hit major-league pitching consistently, and he has no power. If he can continue to hit .260 or so, he'll be useful, and he probably has a future as a backup infielder. (Keith Law)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      All three players have potential and risk, but that's true of all prospects, especially those taken late in the 1st round and in the supplemental round. I'm not a enough of a amateur prospect hound to know if there were players they should have taken instead or not. So I guess we just wait and see!

                      I kinda like that with the pitchers they went with a LHP who's solid but not as much upside, then a RHP who's less a sure thing but with more upside.
                      Visit my card site at Mike D's Baseball Card Page.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Mike D. View Post
                        All three players have potential and risk, but that's true of all prospects, especially those taken late in the 1st round and in the supplemental round. I'm not a enough of a amateur prospect hound to know if there were players they should have taken instead or not. So I guess we just wait and see!

                        I kinda like that with the pitchers they went with a LHP who's solid but not as much upside, then a RHP who's less a sure thing but with more upside.
                        While I'm far from a "amateur prospect hound" the feeling that I get from reading and listening to others who are prospect experts (or at least have me fooled enough to believe they are) is this:

                        - Marrero might have been the "best" available at 24. He was seen as high as a potential top 5 pick not too long ago, but had a disappointing junior season and fell down to 24. A bit like Bradley Jr. last year (except Bradley's not so great season was because of a wrist injury while Marrero's was (so it appears) because of a mechanical flaw in his hitting). Unlike Swiss, I do not see him as a Iglesias 2.0, although it doesn't seem like he's going to be much of a homerun hitter.

                        - Johnson is a two-way player, although the Sox have said they drafted him as a pitcher. BA had him ranked as #39, the Sox picked him with #31. He doesn't have the ceiling that others (who were still on the board at that point) have, but should have a low enough floor to make this at least an interesting pick. Doesn't seem like a huge reach, but I have a hard time to be excited about a player who's ceiling is fourth starter.

                        - Light is seen as a bit of a surprise to go that early. BA had him ranked at #81 and the Red Sox picked him at 37. Seems like a bit of a reach.

                        My impression (which we'll find out if it is correct or not today) is that the Sox went with three guys that they can sign to slot or below slot deals on Day 1 (All 3 are college juniors with little leverage in negotiations) so that they can use some of that money to go above slot on some of the remaining higher ceiling/lower floor high school guys that are still left. This, by the way, seems like the exact opposite strategy of what the Jays are doing.

                        Of course it is not the kind of draft the Red Sox had in past years but the rules of the draft have changes significantly. The Sox can't flex their financial muscles as they did before to sign the "high ceiling-signability question-guys" that other teams were to timid to pick early on. I would have liked Eflin (a HS RHP with considerably higer ceiling than Johnson but also considerably more risk of course) over Johnson at 31 (and of course was hoping for the likes of Cecchini, Giolito or Wacha to drop to 24) but really I'm talking about liking one guy I have never seen play better than another guy I have never seen play. So maybe I should just trust Ben, Amiel and the rest of the FO.
                        Last edited by Therwil Flyer; 06-05-2012, 08:53 AM.
                        Watching Derek Jeter make 40 defensive plays and then watching Adam Everett make 40 defensive plays at the same position is sort of like watching video of Barbara Bush dancing at the White House, and then watching Demi Moore dancing in Striptease. (Bill James)

                        Dustin Pedroia doesn't have the strength or bat speed to hit major-league pitching consistently, and he has no power. If he can continue to hit .260 or so, he'll be useful, and he probably has a future as a backup infielder. (Keith Law)

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I thought I read something about a ankle injury being the reason for Marrero's less than stellar season.
                          Visit my card site at Mike D's Baseball Card Page.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Therwil Flyer View Post
                            Marrero was mentioned as a possible top 10 pick last summer and I'm pretty sure that's not just because of his defense. From what I read, he's a somewhat aggressive hitter with a complicated swing but does possess some pop in his bat.
                            Pat Light could be a stroke of genius or a total bust, only time will tell. Read on another board that therewas at least one other team looking to take him in the supp. round (which would explain why the Red Sox didn't wait longer to take him and use their supp round pick on someone like Eflin).
                            Johnson at 31, I don't get. I assume he will sign below recommended slot, so the Sox have some extra money for the second day.

                            Different rules, different draft. Barnes continues to cruise through high A.
                            I know, I followed the top draft prospect list all the time. But he is there because of his glove. There is no doubt about that at all. First they said he could be ok with the bat, now, after hitting .279 in college (that's a red flag, and that's the reason 23 teams passed on him), he could be rather Brendan Ryan or so. But maybe the Sox saw something in him while scouting at the cape cod. Who knows. Bryce Brentz had a down year too in his last college year. Yet on a totally different level (.1080 OPS was down for him), Marrero was down with a .772 OPS. But also last year he didnt hit well for college measurments. .799 OPS. His best year was as a freshman (.1070). So Marrero has been worse with his bat as his college career progressed. Maybe Dave Magadan will do wonders, who knows.

                            The draft class was weak and that was why I would have drafted high upside high school players instead of going college with the first two picks. But the Red sox know better, obviously.

                            Originally posted by Therwil Flyer View Post
                            My impression (which we'll find out if it is correct or not today) is that the Sox went with three guys that they can sign to slot or below slot deals on Day 1 (All 3 are college juniors with little leverage in negotiations) so that they can use some of that money to go above slot on some of the remaining higher ceiling/lower floor high school guys that are still left. This, by the way, seems like the exact opposite strategy of what the Jays are doing.
                            That could be the reason, as I mentioned too.

                            My pick at 24th and the rumor was that it was the Red Sox pick too, was Marcus Stroman. That would have been a super pick in an otherwise weak class. He could have helped the bullpen in September and then being used as a SP in 2013.
                            Last edited by SwissRedSoxFan; 06-05-2012, 09:20 AM.
                            I know you're watching, Si. Bu.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by SwissRedSoxFan View Post
                              My pick at 24th and the rumor was that it was the Red Sox pick too, was Marcus Stroman. That would have been a super pick in an otherwise weak class. He could have helped the bullpen in September and then being used as a SP in 2013.
                              But Stroman was gone at 24 (He was picked at 22 by Toronto)!
                              Watching Derek Jeter make 40 defensive plays and then watching Adam Everett make 40 defensive plays at the same position is sort of like watching video of Barbara Bush dancing at the White House, and then watching Demi Moore dancing in Striptease. (Bill James)

                              Dustin Pedroia doesn't have the strength or bat speed to hit major-league pitching consistently, and he has no power. If he can continue to hit .260 or so, he'll be useful, and he probably has a future as a backup infielder. (Keith Law)

                              Comment

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