Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

2019 White Sox wrap up thread

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • 2019 White Sox wrap up thread

    I was pretty quiet during the season and just was watching developments. I'll be breaking down the team and giving my thoughts.


    Tim Anderson - offensively, he seemed to understand hitting the ball to where it is pitched better. He reduced his strikeout rate quite a bit, and this made a difference. I'm sure he had some luck in BA this year, but in my opinion, most of his league leading BA was based on skill. I don't think he is a true 0.335 hitter, due to the strikeouts and only having medium power, but I think he could be a true 0.290-0.300 hitter for the next 3-4 years with medium level power. He is a true old school "I'm swinging at everything" type hitter, and only drew 15 walks.

    The whole team didn't have a batting eye and the White Sox are bringing in a new hitting coach, Frank Menechino, who supposedly is going to emphasize strike zone recognition and picking the correct pitch to hit (but not taking walks necessarily). Hopefully Anderson can take a few more..which would stabilize his OBP (with an assumed drop in BA).

    My long term issue with Anderson has been his glove. Most of his issues are mental, not physical. I personally think he has outstanding range to his right...in the last series of the year he made at least three great plays moving to his right. He moved far into the hole and made strong throws to get the runner. I don't think his range is as great to his left though. His inconsistencies with errors are a huge mark against him - he made another 26 errors this year, following up years of 20 and 28. High pops to the short outfield are always tricky figuring out who is to catch the ball, but I don't think he's an expert at this phase of the game. I think he does better when relying on physical defensive skills, but I don't think he does so well in the analyzing the pitcher/hitter game...sometimes he puts himself out of position. Defense is not his specialty...except I really like his range to the hole (which is extremely important, because we have a big butcher at third).

    Prognosis - he's likeable and media friendly, and seems to be developing as a "face" for the Chi Sox. If he could master the consistency and thinking elements of playing shortstop, I'd like him a lot more. Those are correctable issues.
    Washington Nationals: 2019 World Series Champs!

    Play the Who am I? game in trivia and you can make this signature line yours for 3 days (baseball signatures only!)

    Go here for a link to all player links! http://www.baseball-fever.com/forum/...player-threads

    Go here for all your 1920's/1930's OF info

  • #2
    The Sox are set for the immediate future on the left side of their infield. That means working with what they have, going forward.

    Anderson's emergence as a hitter coincided with a decline on defense. Not having watched many Sox games this year, I was unaware how much of his defensive miscues were mental lapses. The Sox would be well advised to get an infield specialist along the lines of a Ron Washington to work specifically with Anderson throughout the offseason. A small, but singular investment in coaching Anderson in a very fixable area - it's not like he's not quick enough or doesn't have a strong enough throwing arm - should yield substantial improvement next season.

    It appears the defensive metrics show Moncada as average to very good in the field, depending on the metric, so I'm uncertain what the "big butcher at third" remark refers to. If Moncada does have a problem handling the ball at third, that's all the more reason for the Sox to invest in some one-on-one infield coaching over the winter. I'm certain there are more than a few ex-major leaguers, minor league or college coaches who would be happy to act as personal trainers this winter for a modest sum. Heck, what's Ozzie Guillen doing these days?

    Regardless, it seems to me that the left side of the infield is the team's greatest area of certainty heading into 2020.
    "It is a simple matter to erect a Hall of Fame, but difficult to select the tenants." -- Ken Smith
    "I am led to suspect that some of the electorate is very dumb." -- Henry P. Edwards
    "You have a Hall of Fame to put people in, not keep people out." -- Brian Kenny
    "There's no such thing as a perfect ballot." -- Jay Jaffe

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Chadwick View Post
      The Sox are set for the immediate future on the left side of their infield. That means working with what they have, going forward.

      Anderson's emergence as a hitter coincided with a decline on defense. Not having watched many Sox games this year, I was unaware how much of his defensive miscues were mental lapses. The Sox would be well advised to get an infield specialist along the lines of a Ron Washington to work specifically with Anderson throughout the offseason. A small, but singular investment in coaching Anderson in a very fixable area - it's not like he's not quick enough or doesn't have a strong enough throwing arm - should yield substantial improvement next season.

      It appears the defensive metrics show Moncada as average to very good in the field, depending on the metric, so I'm uncertain what the "big butcher at third" remark refers to. If Moncada does have a problem handling the ball at third, that's all the more reason for the Sox to invest in some one-on-one infield coaching over the winter. I'm certain there are more than a few ex-major leaguers, minor league or college coaches who would be happy to act as personal trainers this winter for a modest sum. Heck, what's Ozzie Guillen doing these days?

      Regardless, it seems to me that the left side of the infield is the team's greatest area of certainty heading into 2020.
      More later, but Moncada is a butcher. Give him a meat cleaver and he'd have a new job. For every snazzy looking play he makes, there are 1.5 where I say "he should have made that play." DRS at least says he's a bad fielder. Trust me, we had four very bad fielders - Anderson (mental), Moncada (just inept), Abreu (slowest hands I've ever seen at first base), Jimenez (biggest issue is that he can't read the ball off the bat, needs to have 300 daily balls hit to him for the next 6 months).

      As to Moncada...maybe he can learn to field, who knows. I wouldn't have thought he'd be able to cut down on whiffs some, but he did. More optimistic on Anderson improving, because hopefully mental acuity can be taught/focused on. Abreu has the least chance to improve....his hands are that bad, nothing to be done for it. I went to a game in September where the left side of the infield throw was high (head level) and Abreu barely got the mitt high enough or he would have taken a head shot. Not a good thing.
      Last edited by Toledo Inquisition; 10-17-2019, 12:06 PM.
      Washington Nationals: 2019 World Series Champs!

      Play the Who am I? game in trivia and you can make this signature line yours for 3 days (baseball signatures only!)

      Go here for a link to all player links! http://www.baseball-fever.com/forum/...player-threads

      Go here for all your 1920's/1930's OF info

      Comment


      • #4
        Next on the list is Eloy Jimenez, who we received in the Jose Quintana trade. I thought it was a potential steal at the time, and still do. Quintana is a C+/B- pitcher, who usually pitched well enough to keep us in the game but not win it...he pitched to the score much too frequently.

        Oh well, Eloy time. He displayed great power at age 22 (31 homers in 468 AB) and hit for an okay average (0.267). That's fantastic for a young hitter and he could get better. He needs help with the strike zone (30 walks, 134 K), but at least he was only at a 29% strikeout rate...if he can cut it just a little, he's got a good chance to be a real All Star level hitter. There's such a major difference between a 23%-24% strikeout rate and a 30% rate, it is a big deal. Increase the walks a bit, cut the strikeouts a bit, keep the power where it is, learn to hit a bit more situationally....I could foresee a 0.290/0.360/0.550 type player. We'd love that! A great rookie offensive year.

        With the glove, he was brutal. He did a terrible job reading the ball off the bat, just no recognition of where it is going. Many misplayed balls he should have caught. I think his speed and arm are okay for right field (especially his speed), but he needs thousands of balls hit to him to practice recognition of the ball path. Fortunately this is something some MLB players have been able to approve upon. I haven't seen enough of his arm to give that a fair review. The White Sox internally and in the press have opined that he might be a career DH if he doesn't improve. That's pretty rough when you have a 22-year old.

        Right now his only MLB plus skill is power, with the others at most being average. He *might* improve on some of them with practice, but the organization is hopeful for his bat, not so much with the glove. Ricky Renteria keeps saying he needs to improve defensively but strides are being made. He's the most optimistic in the organization in my opinion. Many believe he is a career DH. Depends if he can learn to play the hitter while in the field.
        Washington Nationals: 2019 World Series Champs!

        Play the Who am I? game in trivia and you can make this signature line yours for 3 days (baseball signatures only!)

        Go here for a link to all player links! http://www.baseball-fever.com/forum/...player-threads

        Go here for all your 1920's/1930's OF info

        Comment

        Ad Widget

        Collapse
        Working...
        X