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Remembering Aurelio Rodriguez!!

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  • Remembering Aurelio Rodriguez!!

    Aurelio was great.
    I met him some years ago at a card show! He was a true gentleman.
    He looked then like he could still play.

    Sadly he is no longer with us. He deserves our remebrance.

    He was a great 3d baseman. He had a cannon over there.
    I understand he started out as a pitcher!?

    I never saw anyone throw so hard/fast from third.
    When T Fryman came along at SS, it reminded me of the original A Rod.
    Fryman had a strong arm too, but not like Aurelio.

    I missed him when he retired. I miss him more now that he is gone.
    Brookens was okay, but never really filled the bill in comparison.

    If there ever is an official Tigers Hall of Fame, (maybe there is by now, I have been out of Detroit for a few years) I would strongly support Aurelio.
    He is one of the best 3d baggers the Tigers have had, especially in the last 30 - 35 years.
    1968 and 1984, the greatest ever.

  • #2
    The wooden bat I used growing up was a Rodriguez model. I still have it, worn as it is.
    Dave Bill Tom George Mark Bob Ernie Soupy Dick Alex Sparky
    Joe Gary MCA Emanuel Sonny Dave Earl Stan
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    Robin Bill Ernie JEDI

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Captain Cold Nose
      The wooden bat I used growing up was a Rodriguez model. I still have it, worn as it is.
      That's what I am talking about. You are a great fan!!!
      1968 and 1984, the greatest ever.

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      • #4
        He played only one year for the Senators (1970) but became one of my favorites that summer. He actually hit ok, for a Senator, showing a bit of power with 19 HR and 31 doubles. The Tigers got him in the Denny McLean trade that was so bad for Washington.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Bob Hannah
          He played only one year for the Senators (1970) but became one of my favorites that summer. He actually hit ok, for a Senator, showing a bit of power with 19 HR and 31 doubles. The Tigers got him in the Denny McLean trade that was so bad for Washington.
          I believe that was the same trade involving Jim Hannah and Eddie Brinkman (?). Brinkman is another unsung Tiger hero for another thread another time.
          1968 and 1984, the greatest ever.

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          • #6
            How good a glove man was Rodriguez?? Well, he was one of the worst hitting 3B's in history and yet kept his job for many years.
            Buck O'Neil: The Monarch of Baseball

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            • #7
              Aurelio Rodriguez

              I live here in southwest detroit near were aurelio rodriguez was killed on vernor street. here was suppose to be at a sports show in taylor michigan on the weekend he died. i still remmber going to historic tiger stadium and watching him back in the 1970s.every once in a while you will see the famous mark the bird fidrych game from 1976 on tv with aurelio playing for the tigers.
              LONG LIVE THE POLO GROUNDS 1891-1964
              http://groups.yahoo.com/group/POLOGROUNDS1962

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Tigerfan1974
                I believe that was the same trade involving Jim Hannah and Eddie Brinkman (?). Brinkman is another unsung Tiger hero for another thread another time.
                You guys also got pitcher Joe Coleman in that trade. That trade really hurt the Senators, taking away the left side of the infield a starter and reliever for McLean, Don Wert (who I think didn't evern play for the Senators), Elliott Maddox and Norm McRea. Maddox played some for Washington, don't believe McRae played for them at all. McLean lost 22 games.

                Brinkman's hitting had improved immensely after Ted Williams came to manage Washington. He fell back to his old ways in Detroit without Williams around. That may (?) have been the case with Rodriguez, too. Also, playing in RFK helped no hitter at all.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by KCGHOST
                  How good a glove man was Rodriguez?? Well, he was one of the worst hitting 3B's in history and yet kept his job for many years.
                  Great reflexes, quick, sure handed and a cannon arm. He was Detroit's starting thirdbaseman through most of the seventies despite being a pretty rotten hitter.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Bob Hannah
                    Great reflexes, quick, sure handed and a cannon arm. He was Detroit's starting thirdbaseman through most of the seventies despite being a pretty rotten hitter.
                    I agree!
                    Glove-wise I would say he was about right there with the 70's comtemporaries of Brooks and a young Schmidt. (just my opinion)

                    Bat-wise, no, not that great.
                    1968 and 1984, the greatest ever.

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                    • #11
                      Aurelio made every play at third base, no matter how difficult, look effortless! It was sheer pleasure watching him play the position.
                      It was unfortunate for him that he played in the same era as the Orioles' Brooks Robinson, who was a much better hitter and whose reputation as a better all-around player and league-wide fan favorite precluded Aurelio from winning Gold Glove awards. Otherwise, I have no doubt that Aurelio would have won the award perennially throughout his career.

                      What was frustrating about Aurelio as a hitter was that he had pop in his bat, but would not shorten his swing to gain better bat control. He also was not very selective at the plate. I remember him being quoted in a newspaper as saying, "I believe that I can hit any pitch." Roberto Clemente could get away with being a free-swinger, Aurelio could not. I believe the Tigers abided with his shortcomings at the plate because the teams he played on had other hitters and he along with "Steady Eddie" Brinkman formed a solid defensive left side of the infield who played every day.
                      Aurelio also would usually bat in the bottom of the order in front of Brinkman, another fine fielder but weak hitter; therefore he would rarely see a fastball with two strikes. Sometimes against certain left-handed pitchers he'd bat second.
                      I often wondered if he realized how special (highly prized and payed!) of a player he could have been had he only worked to improve his hitting.
                      Last edited by moldyoldie; 02-17-2006, 01:27 PM.

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                      • #12
                        With Brinkman, Aurelio covered that left side of the infield like no others.
                        They were like money in the bank for a ground ball pitcher.
                        Too bad those guys couldn't hit for much. If they reached the .280 mark, we could have had more competitive teams in the 70's.

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                        • #13
                          Two things I remember most about Aurelio: That big, black, tattered glove, and that big, black, tattered moustache!
                          "Hey Mr. McGraw! Can I pitch to-day?"

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Victory Faust
                            Two things I remember most about Aurelio: That big, black, tattered glove, and that big, black, tattered moustache!
                            don't forget, one of the few players to have all of the vowels in his name!
                            Johnny
                            Delusion, Life's Coping Mechanism

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by johnny
                              don't forget, one of the few players to have all of the vowels in his name!
                              Except for the "sometimes Y".

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