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Please Don't Freak Out when Cabrera and Rentaria start out slow

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  • Please Don't Freak Out when Cabrera and Rentaria start out slow

    I know people on this site are more intelligent than on the mlb.com boards, so I should be writing this there, but oh well

    I wouldn't doubt it if Miguel and Edgar start out slow this year

    they are on new teams and they are more used to warmer weather. Detroit is probably going to pretty cold starting out.

    i just hope there won't be people freaking out if they slump....but there always are those people
    "Batting stats and pitching stats do not indicate the quality of play, merely which part of that struggle is dominant at the moment."

    -Bill James

  • #2
    From what I remember about the other board, they'll be calling for Jim Leyland's head if Cabrera or Renteria start slow.
    "Someone asked me if I took steroids. I said, 'No. I had a contract with Wheaties.'"
    --Bob Feller

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    • #3
      I remember when Sheff started slow and people were freaking out.....
      "Batting stats and pitching stats do not indicate the quality of play, merely which part of that struggle is dominant at the moment."

      -Bill James

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      • #4
        Slow starts

        We shouldn't worry about slow starts, there is enough lumber in the lineup to overcome a couple hitters with slow starts. Remember this, Sheffield admitted last year, that being DH was a bit strange to him. I am sure that he has overcome the newness and will be ready to rock. Additionally, Leland has said that Sheffield's use in the field will be very limited. You have Jones, (unfortunately Thames) and Rayburn to fill in the fielding needs. Also, if Vance Wilson is healthy Inge will do in a pinch. A prayer for a healthy lineup is all that is required.


        GO TIGERS!!!

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        • #5
          Renteria was a Card, and from what i've seen St. Louis isn't the warmest place in the world. Neither was Boston.
          Originally posted by Domenic
          The Yankees should see if Yogi Berra can still get behind the plate - he has ten World Series rings... he must be worth forty or fifty million a season.

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          • #6
            Really? I thought StL fans were known for their hospitality?
            "he probably used some performance enhancing drugs so he could do a better job on his report...i hear they make you gain weight" - Dr. Zizmor

            "I thought it was interesting and yes a conversation piece. Next time I post a similar story I will close with the question "So, do you think either of them have used steroids?" so that I can make the topic truly relevant to discussions about today's game." - Eric Davis

            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gqul1GyK7-g

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Westlake View Post
              Renteria was a Card, and from what i've seen St. Louis isn't the warmest place in the world. Neither was Boston.
              NOT a good example. Rent was neither successful nor happy in Boston.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Imgran View Post
                NOT a good example. Rent was neither successful nor happy in Boston.
                It wasn't an example. It's fact that he played there.

                Originally posted by ChrisLDuncan View Post
                Really? I thought StL fans were known for their hospitality?
                You do know that by 'warm' I actually meant warm -- as in hot, heat.
                Originally posted by Domenic
                The Yankees should see if Yogi Berra can still get behind the plate - he has ten World Series rings... he must be worth forty or fifty million a season.

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                • #9
                  Edgar Rentaria wasn't that bad in Boston. He wasn't as good as he was in STL but, still good for a SS:
                  Code:
                  Decade	POS	T/B	Team	Age	Player  Name	Exp	Year	G	AB	R	H	2B	3B	HR	RBI	SB	BB	SO	AVG	OFF	G	PO	A	E	DP	TC	PB	DEF	VALUE
                  2000	SS	R/R	BOS	29	Rentaria, Edgar	10	2005	153	623	100	172	36	4	8	70	9	55	100	.276	688	153	227	398	30	90	655		1083	786
                  Last edited by HDH; 02-20-2008, 02:45 AM.
                  In the 1920's, Harry Heilmann led the AL with a .364 average. In addition, he averaged 220 hits, 45 doubles, 12 triples, 16 homers, 110 runs, and 130 RBI.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by sturg1dj View Post
                    I remember when Sheff started slow and people were freaking out.....
                    Actually, I remember it being kinda tame. In fact I can recall talking to my neighbors at the ballpark (just about the entire row is the same mini season ticket holders for the last 4 years). Just imagine had Gary stayed in NY what they would of done to him over his month of April 2007. Toward the end of his slump there were a few boo birds but not many.

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                    • #11
                      The only ones to freak out due to a slow start will be the bandwagoners. Most hitters and pitchers switching to the AL regress a bit the first season -- but not all.

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