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Jeter in the Clutch

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  • Jeter in the Clutch

    http://www.aarongleeman.com/2003_10_...32099586322001

    Scroll down that link and read the articles entitled "Derek is really, really cute", and "Derek is really, really cute (part two)".

    Just to show the main point of the articles, here's an excerpt that pretty much summs it up:

    "In his entire post-season career, a total of 99 games spread over eight seasons, Derek Jeter is a .210/.355/.306 hitter with runners in scoring position and a .245/.345/.329 hitter with men on base. Take that and add in the fact that, over the last four post-seasons, he is a .176/.263/.323 hitter in "close and late" situations, and I think it is safe to say that my sarcastic response to Jeter constantly being hailed as "Mr. Clutch" is completely justified."
    Last edited by 538280; 01-15-2006, 12:08 PM.

  • #2
    Yikes. I knew he wasn't anywhere near what people said he was, but i didn't know he was that bad. The notion that Jeter is so clutch is based on a few big moments he has had in the postseason, which are mostly due to the insane amount of postseason games he has played in his career.

    Don't expect anyone to actually pay attention to this though, as most Yankee fans seem to cherish their idealized image of Jeter and refuse to except the idea that he isn't the most clutch player ever.

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    • #3
      The last four postseasons he's played in? That's a miniscule sample size.

      I don't believe in clutch anyway. I laugh at the people who would rather have Jeter up in a big spot over A-Rod. It's absurd.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by pacewon
        The last four postseasons he's played in? That's a miniscule sample size.

        I don't believe in clutch anyway. I laugh at the people who would rather have Jeter up in a big spot over A-Rod. It's absurd.
        The paragraph excerpted above is from the Part Two article, and includes his entire postseason career, which actually isn't all that small a sample size.

        Jeter has actually been very "unclutch" in the postseason, getting most of his hits in non clutch situations. His total postseason line is .313/.381/.469, but he has been terrible in the clutch postseason situations.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by pacewon
          I don't believe in clutch anyway. I laugh at the people who would rather have Jeter up in a big spot over A-Rod. It's absurd.
          Why, because you would rather see A-Rod hit into a clutch double play?

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by 538280
            The paragraph excerpted above is from the Part Two article, and includes his entire postseason career, which actually isn't all that small a sample size.
            I was only addressing the part of the article that began with "over the last four post-seasons".

            Originally posted by 538280
            Jeter has actually been very "unclutch" in the postseason, getting most of his hits in non clutch situations. His total postseason line is .313/.381/.469, but he has been terrible in the clutch postseason situations.
            Here's one thing I question, though, and keep in mind that I don't believe any player is "clutch" or "unclutch"... how many "non-clutch situations" are there in postseason baseball games? Since they're games that have to be won, isn't hitting a leadoff double in the 4th inning and putting yourself in scoring position somewhat of a significant play? You don't get any credit for hitting with RISP, or in a close and late situation, yet you've given your team a good chance to get a run across in an ultra-significant game.

            Being that Jeter is the all-time postseason leader in hits, but his close and late numbers are so putrid, it leads me to believe he's got impressive numbers in the earlier innings of his team's postseason games.

            I almost saw David Ortiz undeservingly swipe an MVP Award away from A-Rod last year because a couple of idiot voters think that homers only count in the 9th inning. Run production in innings 1-6 can be just as essential as run production in innings 7-9, those which are designated as the time frame for close and late situations.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by SD Bomber Fan
              Why, because you would rather see A-Rod hit into a clutch double play?
              Because A-Rod is undoubtedly the superior player, and I want my best player up in the most important situation.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by 538280
                His total postseason line is .313/.381/.469
                very minor discrepancy, but it really is:

                .307/.379/.463

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