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Giancarlo Stanton Clutch Performance

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  • Giancarlo Stanton Clutch Performance

    The general consensus about Giancarlo Stanton is that he has picked up his offensive performance since Aaron Judge went down. And the statistics will back up this statement. But here is what I would really like to know...

    If we take the sample size of Stanton's offensive numbers from when Judge went on the DL up until the last game in Minnesota, I'd like to know:

    - How much of that offense came when the Yankees were down in a game?
    - How much of that offense came when the Yankees were tied in a game?

    and...

    How much of his offensive performance came when the Yankees had a lead (how much of the offense was tack on)?

    I ask because in spite of his very good offensive numbers, it feels as if he NEVER comes through in the clutch.

    I'm hoping that someone with experience working with statistics can provide this info.

    Thank you in advance.

    Dom

  • #2
    I can't get you the numbers you are looking for but even if I could I don't think it would tell us much about Stanton's clutchness.

    How much of his offensive performance came when the Yankees had a lead (how much of the offense was tack on)?
    So if the Yankees have a 1 run lead and Stanton hits a 2 run homer to make it a 3 run lead, that is somehow meaningless or not clutch?
    My top 10 players:

    1. Babe Ruth
    2. Barry Bonds
    3. Ty Cobb
    4. Ted Williams
    5. Willie Mays
    6. Alex Rodriguez
    7. Hank Aaron
    8. Honus Wagner
    9. Lou Gehrig
    10. Mickey Mantle

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    • #3
      Didn't mean to suggest that. I'm just curious to know. I mean it feels like when we need him most, he's striking out or popping up. Maybe it's my imagination, but until I see the numbers, I won't know.

      Comment


      • #4
        Dom, FWIW Stanton ranks 14th in the American League this year in WPA/LI:
        . .
        While measuring "clutchness" is not a perfect science and it is debatable whether sustained clutchness even exists, WPA/LI attempts to calculate a player's offensive contributions throughout the season, how much the outcome of every plate appearance increased or decreased his team's chances of winning the game, while considering the leverage index of every plate appearance. (i.e. a home run in a tie game is given more weight than a home run with a 5 run lead).

        Based on this one measurement, Stanton is doing just fine when it matters.
        Last edited by GiambiJuice; 09-14-2018, 10:48 AM.
        My top 10 players:

        1. Babe Ruth
        2. Barry Bonds
        3. Ty Cobb
        4. Ted Williams
        5. Willie Mays
        6. Alex Rodriguez
        7. Hank Aaron
        8. Honus Wagner
        9. Lou Gehrig
        10. Mickey Mantle

        Comment


        • #5
          Thank you for the info. I wasn't sure if it was my imagination.

          Comment


          • #6
            His numbers with RISP is a tad low with a slash line of .243/.319/.390 thus far in 2018 and .232/.303/.429 with men on base. In high leverage situations the numbers look like this: .239/.306/.477.

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