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  • Your opinion of George Steinbrenner?

    Did you approve or disapprove of his ownership of the Yankees?
    17
    Yay
    76.47%
    13
    Nay
    23.53%
    4

  • #2
    Approved.

    He took a fledgling franchise and returned them into a dynasty, and one of the premier franchises in all sports.

    What more could fans ask of an owner? He wasn't just an owner, but he was also a fan and winning was the most important thing to him. While at times this proved to be a problem, for the most part it was a good thing.

    I don't think I've ever met a Yankee fan who hated or had a problem with George.
    "After my fourth season I asked for $43,000 and General Manager Ed Barrow told me, 'Young man, do you realize Lou Gehrig, a 16-year-man, is playing for only $44,000?' I said, Mr. Barrow, there is only one answer to that - Mr. Gehrig is terribly underpaid."- Yankees outfielder Joe DiMaggio

    Comment


    • #3
      From a fan's perspective, George was the greatest owner anybody could ask for. He put winning above all else and was willing to put his money where his mouth was.

      Sure, he treated his employees like crap but that's not my concern. So did Steve Jobs, and he is worshipped. Anyone who didn't like working for George was free to leave at any time.
      My top 10 players:

      1. Babe Ruth
      2. Barry Bonds
      3. Ty Cobb
      4. Ted Williams
      5. Willie Mays
      6. Alex Rodriguez
      7. Hank Aaron
      8. Honus Wagner
      9. Lou Gehrig
      10. Mickey Mantle

      Comment


      • #4
        Strongly disapproved of his ownership. I guess that's the nice way to put it. If you didn't live through his entire tenure, then you may not appreciate how bad it was. I was eleven when he bought Yanks. Til then, Yanks were mostly mediocre and were eight years into an eleven year playoff drought. It was tough times for a young fan, especially with mets winning it all in '69. I knew all about Yanks glorious history, but that didn't help much in the schoolyard or on the sandlot when mets fans actually had the upper hand in the "what have you done lately?" arguments. Yanks still had class, and all that tradition including the grand old Stadium, but they weren't contenders. steinbrenner comes along and says he'll do whatever it takes to bring a winner in five years. Sounds good, but we're a little cynical. Who is this guy from Cleveland, who lost out on a bid to buy the Indians?
        First thing he does is start sending notes to manager Ralph Houk, like "tell #'s 1, 15, 17, etc to get haircuts". While I appreciate the clean-cut policy, Houk didn't appreciate the notes and the players thought steinbarber was a jerk for not even knowing his players names. Houk quit at the end of the '73 season after putting up with crap suggestions all season from a guy with a football mentality. Fan favorite Bobby Murcer was traded after the '74 season.This would be like trading Mattingly or Jeter as far as the fans were concerned. Murcer didn't have that type of talent, but he was very good and was a career Yank, coming up through the system and hyped as the next Mantle. Several good trades were made during the next few years by GM Gabe Paul, a knowlegable baseball man who, it turned out, traded Murcer because he was making 100 Grand and Paul was pissed.
        In '75 Yanks hired Billy Martin in August, on Old-Timers Day, and fans were ecstatic. In '76 Yanks go to the Series but lose in four straight. The team was already full of non-Yanks like Chambliss, Randolph, Nettles, Rivers, Piniella and Gamble acquired thru trades, and the Yanks first big free agent signing, Catfish Hunter. I'm not knocking all the trades, but the only home-grown regulars left were White and Munson. Then they sign Reggie Jackson and things would never be the same. Yes, they won it all in '77 and '78, and it was very exciting. But they didn't do it with homegrown guys, and they didn't do it with class. There was constant criticism from the press and the mets fans about steinbuyer 'buying' the championships, and it was hard to disagree. Of course there was all the turmoil in '78 with george and Martin, Reggie and Martin, and Reggie and Munson. Jackson was such an egotistical jerk that most of his teammates couldn't stand him. I was watching almost every game those years and believe me, he left many a runner on base with his numerous strikeouts and popups. He was a hero for hitting late-inning homers but a few singles earlier in those games would have been just as effective. I mention all this because he was strictly "georges boy", wined and dined by the owner who wanted the publicity as much as a championship.
        It was during this season that Billy Martin's life started to unwind, courtesy of george. Billy had his demons but they were under control until george started criticizing and berating him on a daily basis until he cracked. Of course the NY writers ate it up. Once Billy was fired it started a revolving door of managers which lasted for over ten years. Constant hirings, firing and rehirings were the norm and the organization became a laughingstock. How about ZERO postseason appearances from 1982-1994? Sound like fun? It wasn't. And all the while, the owner was meddling and interfering and making ridiculous statements. You would think that in those years he had learned something about baseball, or at least learned to leave things in the hands of his 'baseball people', as he called them. They were the ones who took the blame whenever one of his trade ideas failed.
        The team hit rock-bottom in the early nineties, finishing in last place for the first time since 1966! Finally, when he was suspended for life from day-to-day operations with the team, thing started to turn around. Gene Michael and Buck Showalter put together a solid team by getting rid of a few miscreants, making some good trades and by bringing up their minor leaguers the right way--with Yankee Pride. Incredibly, his lifetime ban only lasted two years. He came back and tried to screw things up again, but he actually let Michael run things the right way.
        Slightly mellowed in his older years he cried like a baby at several post-Series celebrations. Real tough-guy george. There are many, many more examples of his idiocy as an owner ,but to me the single worst thing he has done was to let the Stadium be demolished. The most famous ballpark in America, the place where so much baseball history had taken place, and he couldn't wait to get out of there. Again, if you didn't live through it, you don't realize how hard it was.
        As early as 1986 he was threatening to break the lease and move to New Jersey. Whether this was business leverage or not, it was making me sick. Why the hell would you move out of Yankee Stadium?? It only got worse in the 90's when other teams started building new parks, and rich spoiled georgie didn't have one. He finally got his dream when Fakee Stadium was designed and built by a bunch of boneheads. I had to laugh when he blubbered at the groundbreaking "We're doing this for you fans". Yeah, right, we were all demanding a new Stadium, all 3-4 million of us who bought tickets those years. To me, he will forever be known as the man who destroyed Yankee Stadium. All his other faults as an owner come in second, but they would be enough for me to put him at the top of my Cantstandya list.
        Last edited by The Monument; 11-06-2015, 06:07 AM. Reason: giambijuice couldnt read it
        Good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen,and welcome to Yankee Stadium. Here are the lineups for todays game...

        Comment


        • #5
          Anyone who wasn't born or old enough during the Stump Merrill or Bucky Dent regimes or is from out of town should read the post above and commit it to memory.

          Comment


          • #6
            Steinbrenner legacy was foremost.
            the old Yankee stars have become diminished.

            Whitey Ford is now the greatest living Yankee but not in the Steinbrenner years so.......

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by The Monument View Post
              As early as 1986 he was threatening to break the lease and move to New Jersey. Whether this was business leverage or not, it was making me sick. Why the hell would you move out of Yankee Stadium?? It only got worse in the 90's when other teams started building new parks, and rich spoiled georgie didn't have one. He finally got his dream when Fakee Stadium was designed and built by a bunch of boneheads. I had to laugh when he blubbered at the groundbreaking "We're doing this for you fans". Yeah, right, we were all demanding a new Stadium, all 3-4 million of us who bought tickets those years. To me, he will forever be known as the man who destroyed Yankee Stadium. All his other faults as an owner come in second, but they would be enough for me to put him at the top of my Cantstandya list.
              Monument, I had no idea that Steinbrenner wanted out of Yankee Stadium as far back as 1986. How could he tear down a stadium with so much history? It has always been a dream of mine to go to New York and go to a game in Yankee Stadium, but since they built the new one, not so anymore really. One more question for you, what happened between him and Yogi? For a long time I remember Yogi didn't go to Yankee Stadium and wanted no part of it.
              Last edited by jsontag; 11-05-2015, 02:06 PM. Reason: spelling
              Axes grind and maces clash!

              Comment


              • #8
                Yogi was Yanks manager in 1984 and they went 87-75, finishing 17 games behind Detroit. The Tigers had a 35-5 start and nobody came close to catching them. In spring training of '85, boss steinliar declared "Yogi is my manager for the entire season, no matter what." After 16 games Yanks were 6-10 and Yogi was fired. He always said that he knew getting fired was part of the job. What bothered him was the way it was handled. george didn't fire Yogi himself, but made GM Clyde King do it. Thats what ticked Yogi off, and he didn't return to the Stadium for about eighteen years.
                Good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen,and welcome to Yankee Stadium. Here are the lineups for todays game...

                Comment


                • #9
                  Thanks Monument. I always wondered what happened. I take it you live in New York City? Was Steinbrenner pretty much hated there?
                  Axes grind and maces clash!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I'm on Long Island, that fish-shaped piece of land jutting out from NYC. Some liked him, some hated him. The ones that liked him always spouted those lines like " He just wanted to win and he wasn't afraid to spend his money to do it". It was how he went about "winning" that I and many others disliked about him. He knew little about baseball and did not always spend his money wisely, signing over-the-hill players just to make a media splash. He also had no patience for rookies. Most of their prospects were traded away for-you guessed it-over-the-hill former stars. Of the very few that made it to the ML roster, only a handful actually stuck with the team and a lot of them, including Guidry, Mo, Bernie, he wanted to get rid of. Only a moment of temporary sanity prevailed when he let someone like Michael convince him to keep certain players. Many rookies had so much pressure put on them that they couldn't produce in the short time given to them, then they were gone.
                    Good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen,and welcome to Yankee Stadium. Here are the lineups for todays game...

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by The Monument View Post
                      Strongly disapproved of his ownership. I guess that's the nice way to put it. If you didn't live through his entire tenure, then you may not appreciate how bad it was. I was eleven when he bought Yanks. Til then, Yanks were mostly mediocre and were eight years into an eleven year playoff drought. It was tough times for a young fan, especially with mets winning it all in '69. I knew all about Yanks glorious history, but that didn't help much in the schoolyard or on the sandlot when mets fans actually had the upper hand in the "what have you done lately?" arguments. Yanks still had class, and all that tradition including the grand old Stadium, but they weren't contenders. steinbrenner comes along and says he'll do whatever it takes to bring a winner in five years. Sounds good, but we're a little cynical. Who is this guy from Cleveland, who lost out on a bid to buy the Indians? First thing he does is start sending notes to manager Ralph Houk, like "tell #'s 1, 15, 17, etc to get haircuts". While I appreciate the clean-cut policy, Houk didn't appreciate the notes and the players thought steinbarber was a jerk for not even knowing his players names. Houk quit at the end of the '73 season after putting up with crap suggestions all season from a guy with a football mentality. Fan favorite Bobby Murcer was traded after the '74 season.This would be like trading Mattingly or Jeter as far as the fans were concerned. Murcer didn't have that type of talent, but he was very good and was a career Yank, coming up through the system and hyped as the next Mantle. Several good trades were made during the next few years by GM Gabe Paul, a knowlegable baseball man who, it turned out, traded Murcer because he was making 100 Grand and Paul was pissed. In '75 Yanks hired Billy Martin in August, on Old-Timers Day, and fans were ecstatic. In '76 Yanks go to the Series but lose in four straight. The team was already full of non-Yanks like Chambliss, Randolph, Nettles, Rivers, Piniella and Gamble acquired thru trades, and the Yanks first big free agent signing, Catfish Hunter. I'm not knocking all the trades, but the only home-grown regulars left were White and Munson. Then they sign Reggie Jackson and things would never be the same. Yes, they won it all in '77 and '78, and it was very exciting. But they didn't do it with homegrown guys, and they didn't do it with class. There was constant criticism from the press and the mets fans about steinbuyer 'buying' the championships, and it was hard to disagree. Of course there was all the turmoil in '78 with george and Martin, Reggie and Martin, and Reggie and Munson. Jackson was such an egotistical jerk that most of his teammates couldn't stand him. I was watching almost every game those years and believe me, he left many a runner on base with his numerous strikeouts and popups. He was a hero for hitting late-inning homers but a few singles earlier in those games would have been just as effective. I mention all this because he was strictly "georges boy", wined and dined by the owner who wanted the publicity as much as a championship. It was during this season that Billy Martin's life started to unwind, courtesy of george. Billy had his demons but they were under control until george started criticizing and berating him on a daily basis until he cracked. Of course the NY writers ate it up. Once Billy was fired it started a revolving door of managers which lasted for over ten years. Constant hirings, firing and rehirings were the norm and the organization became a laughingstock. How about ZERO postseason appearances from 1982-1994? Sound like fun? It wasn't. And all the while, the owner was meddling and interfering and making ridiculous statements. You would think that in those years he had learned something about baseball, or at least learned to leave things in the hands of his 'baseball people', as he called them. They were the ones who took the blame whenever one of his trade ideas failed. The team hit rock-bottom in the early nineties, finishing in last place for the first time since 1966! Finally, when he was suspended for life from day-to-day operations with the team, thing started to turn around. Gene Michael and Buck Showalter put together a solid team by getting rid of a few miscreants, making some good trades and by bringing up their minor leaguers the right way--with Yankee Pride. Incredibly, his lifetime ban only lasted two years. He came back and tried to screw things up again, but he actually let Michael run things the right way. Slightly mellowed in his older years he cried like a baby at several post-Series celebrations. Real tough-guy george. There are many, many more examples of his idiocy as an owner ,but to me the single worst thing he has done was to let the Stadium be demolished. The most famous ballpark in America, the place where so much baseball history had taken place, and he couldn't wait to get out of there. Again, if you didn't live through it, you don't realize how hard it was. As early as 1986 he was threatening to break the lease and move to New Jersey. Whether this was business leverage or not, it was making me sick. Why the hell would you move out of Yankee Stadium?? It only got worse in the 90's when other teams started building new parks, and rich spoiled georgie didn't have one. He finally got his dream when Fakee Stadium was designed and built by a bunch of boneheads. I had to laugh when he blubbered at the groundbreaking "We're doing this for you fans". Yeah, right, we were all demanding a new Stadium, all 3-4 million of us who bought tickets those years. To me, he will forever be known as the man who destroyed Yankee Stadium. All his other faults as an owner come in second, but they would be enough for me to put him at the top of my Cantstandya list.
                      Um...paragraphs?
                      My top 10 players:

                      1. Babe Ruth
                      2. Barry Bonds
                      3. Ty Cobb
                      4. Ted Williams
                      5. Willie Mays
                      6. Alex Rodriguez
                      7. Hank Aaron
                      8. Honus Wagner
                      9. Lou Gehrig
                      10. Mickey Mantle

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by The Monument View Post
                        I'm on Long Island, that fish-shaped piece of land jutting out from NYC. Some liked him, some hated him. The ones that liked him always spouted those lines like " He just wanted to win and he wasn't afraid to spend his money to do it". It was how he went about "winning" that I and many others disliked about him. He knew little about baseball and did not always spend his money wisely, signing over-the-hill players just to make a media splash. He also had no patience for rookies. Most of their prospects were traded away for-you guessed it-over-the-hill former stars. Of the very few that made it to the ML roster, only a handful actually stuck with the team and a lot of them, including Guidry, Mo, Bernie, he wanted to get rid of. Only a moment of temporary sanity prevailed when he let someone like Michael convince him to keep certain players. Many rookies had so much pressure put on them that they couldn't produce in the short time given to them, then they were gone.
                        Thanks so much Monument. Living in San Antonio all my life, especially when I was a kid in the 70's, was 10 in 1977 when the Yankees won the Series, we didn't get much Yankees news here at all, just if they signed, traded, or fired someone on the local news. This was before we had cable. Even with cable, it was only a little better Yankees wise. Thank you for educating and giving me the perspective of New Yorkers as these are things I would not have known. Any prospects that were traded away turn out to be stars?
                        Axes grind and maces clash!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by jsontag View Post
                          Thanks so much Monument. Living in San Antonio all my life, especially when I was a kid in the 70's, was 10 in 1977 when the Yankees won the Series, we didn't get much Yankees news here at all, just if they signed, traded, or fired someone on the local news. This was before we had cable. Even with cable, it was only a little better Yankees wise. Thank you for educating and giving me the perspective of New Yorkers as these are things I would not have known. Any prospects that were traded away turn out to be stars?
                          Fred McGriff, Willie McGee and Jay Buhner are some of the most famous. I believe they brought back Dale Murray, Dave LaPoint and Ken Phelps. Doug Drabek was traded but he may have been for Rick Rhoden who was decent if a bit on the win now side.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by PVNICK View Post
                            Fred McGriff, Willie McGee and Jay Buhner are some of the most famous. I believe they brought back Dale Murray, Dave LaPoint and Ken Phelps. Doug Drabek was traded but he may have been for Rick Rhoden who was decent if a bit on the win now side.
                            Wow, McGriff, Willie Mcgee, and Jay Buhner. Had they stayed Yankees, who knows what might have been.
                            Axes grind and maces clash!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              A young lefty named Al Leiter was traded one month into his Yankee career. He went on to have a decent career. He was traded for Jesse Barfield, a pretty good outfielder with a laser arm. This was around 1986, an obvious win-now move. They didn't. You just don't trade away good young lefties, but boss bonehead always did for established semi-stars.
                              Good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen,and welcome to Yankee Stadium. Here are the lineups for todays game...

                              Comment

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