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  • #61
    Well, Ichiro went 4-6, with 3 runs, and 1 RBI.

    11 hits in 3 days - not bad.

    he now has 247 hits, in 152 games (played in 151 - sat out 1), while he probably won't get 10/11 hits in the next too days (), he still has a shot at the record, in 160/161 games - it will just be accompanied with an asterisk (booh!!!).

    Ichiro's stats:

    151 G, 660 AB, 96 R, 247 H, 211 1B (a new ML record - any century), 23 2B, 5 3B, 8 HR, 56 RBI, 304 TB, 46 BB, 56 SO, 35 SB, 10 CS, .374 BA, .416 OBP, .460 Slg.

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    • #62
      I just felt like posting something, so here goes:

      there are a total of 46 players in MLB history to have at least 1 season with 225+ hits. Of them, 28 are currently in the HOF. Of the 18 players, not in the Hall, 2 are still active (Ichiro and Darren Erstad). 15 of the remaining 16, only had 1 season with 225+ hits; the only retired player with more than one is Joe Jackson with 2, and he is ineligible.

      So all in all, there are 12 players who had 2 or more seasons of 225 or more hits. Of them, all 10 eligibly retired players are in the HOF.

      While this is more or less another way to show that Ichiro deserves to be in the Hall, like I said at the beginning of the post, I just wanted something to type, so if you are some crazy poster that doesn't think some bat flailing, singles hitting, phenomenon deserves to be in the HOF, don't think too far into my post. If the previous statement does not cover you, then by all means, delve deep into my post, and extract some other grain of information from it, that may have something to do with the topic, or even if it doesn't.

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      • #63
        Originally posted by Edgartohof
        I just felt like posting something, so here goes:

        there are a total of 46 players in MLB history to have at least 1 season with 225+ hits. Of them, 28 are currently in the HOF. Of the 18 players, not in the Hall, 2 are still active (Ichiro and Darren Erstad). 15 of the remaining 16, only had 1 season with 225+ hits; the only retired player with more than one is Joe Jackson with 2, and he is ineligible.

        So all in all, there are 12 players who had 2 or more seasons of 225 or more hits. Of them, all 10 eligibly retired players are in the HOF.

        While this is more or less another way to show that Ichiro deserves to be in the Hall, like I said at the beginning of the post, I just wanted something to type, so if you are some crazy poster that doesn't think some bat flailing, singles hitting, phenomenon deserves to be in the HOF, don't think too far into my post. If the previous statement does not cover you, then by all means, delve deep into my post, and extract some other grain of information from it, that may have something to do with the topic, or even if it doesn't.
        Do you think that his seven consecutive batting titles in Japan should even be a consideration? Or should only his MLB career be considered? It's still too early to say for sure, but I suspect if he continues to have the career he's having he could probably get in considering only MLB achievements.

        By the way he's 1 for two so far today. He's down to single digit range.

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        • #64
          2 for 3 now, with a sac fly. Ichiro moves past Cobb for 7th all time!

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          • #65
            So 2 for 4 today with 2 runs, a sac fly, 1 rbi and an intentional walk.

            Ichiro now has 96 runs. It would be somewhat ironic if he were to get the hits record but fail to score 100 runs for the first time since coming to the majors.

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            • #66
              Well, the Mariners just finished their 154th game of the season. Ichiro went 1 for 5 with 2 rbis. So that would give Ichiro the following final statistics if it were a 154-game season:


              669 AB, 98 runs, 250 hits, 23 doubles, 5 triples, 8 HR, 59 rbis, 307 TB, 47 BB, 57 SO, 35 SB, 10 CS, .415 OBP, .459 SLG, .374 BA

              250 hits would be tied for 5th all time with Rogers Hornsby's 1922 season and Chuck Klein's 1930 season.

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              • #67
                Not bad. He has a good chance of getting the record, IMO. It's only going to take a couple 3-3 days, and that's it! Good Luck Ichi!!!
                WAR? Prove it!

                Trusted Traders: ttmman21, Dalkowski110, BoofBonser26, Kearns643, HudsonHarden, Extra Innings, MadHatter, Mike D., J.P., SShifflett

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                • #68
                  This is a wierd offense we have. I haven't seen too many teams that rely on singles to win ball games...
                  "If Heathcliff Slocumb's a closer, then I'm a chinamen"

                  -Harry Carrey

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                  • #69
                    The offense certainly has been showing some signs of life lately though, hasn't it. It was awful for most of the season, but now the bats seem to have come alive in time for the Mariners to act as spoilers against the Angels and Rangers. Case in point: they beat the Rangers today 9-0. Ichiro was held to 1 hit, but that's the minimum pace he needs to be on at least.

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                    • #70
                      I got the feeling that today's going to be the day.

                      I predict Ichiro will get 3 or more hits today (9/29) to tie or surpass the all-time single-season hits record.

                      That is all.

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                      • #71
                        Ugh. h So much for my prophetic abilities.

                        But now (10/30) he has pulled within one hit of a tie! I'm quite confident he'll surpass the record now. He's also got a 10-game hitting streak going.

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                        • #72
                          There's 257!



                          Bottom of the first inning, pitcher Ryan Drese, count 0-2, chopper over the head of 3rd baseman Hank Blalock.

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                          • #73
                            258! Good Job Ichiro!
                            "Under lights in the dark at the edge of the Sound
                            With a crack of the bat the ball flashes to ground
                            And leaps to the left through the glorious green
                            Of the SAFECO Field grass to a fielding machine
                            Comes a grab that is sure and a toss that is shrewd
                            Guillen to Boone to Olerud"

                            Excerpt from "Guillen to Boone to Olerud" by John P. Todd (2001)

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                            • #74
                              WAR? Prove it!

                              Trusted Traders: ttmman21, Dalkowski110, BoofBonser26, Kearns643, HudsonHarden, Extra Innings, MadHatter, Mike D., J.P., SShifflett

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                              • #75
                                An article about the Sisler family, who showed a lot of class I think in coming out to watch Ichiro and congratulate him.
                                10/01/2004 11:53 PM ET
                                A 'proud' moment for Sisler's family
                                Relatives on hand to see Ichiro break record
                                By Jim Street / MLB.com


                                Ichiro Suzuki (left) is congratulated by
                                George Sisler's daughter, Frances, on Friday.
                                (Jim Bryant/AP)

                                SEATTLE -- Three generations of the George Sisler family came to Safeco Field on Friday to witness -- and applaud -- the end of an 84-year-old Major League record dear to their hearts.
                                The family patriarch set the all-time single-season hit record in 1920 when he had 257 hits for the St. Louis Browns. Bill Terry challenged the record in 1929 with 254 hits and Lefty O'Doul made a run the following year, also ending up with 254 hits.

                                But Sisler's record has rested comfortably ever since -- until this season.

                                Mariners right fielder Ichiro Suzuki used speed, bat control, a strong mind and healthy body to challenge, and eventually catch, one of the oldest records in the book.

                                Ichiro entered Friday night's series opener against the Rangers with 256 hits and promptly bounced a single over the head of Rangers third baseman Hank Blalock. Two innings later, Ichiro hit a hard grounder up the middle for his record-breaking 258th hit.

                                The Sisler family, flown in by the Mariners for the three-game series, watched from the Commissioner's box near the first base dugout when Ichiro tied and then broke the record.

                                Two hours earlier, they were sitting at a table in the Safeco Field interview room.

                                "We are here to celebrate baseball and my grandfather," said Ric Sisler. "There are mixed feelings. I'm very proud of my grandfather's accomplishments in baseball, but records are made to be broken."

                                Along with Ric were his mom and George Sisler's only daughter, Frances, grandsons Peter Drochelman and William "Bo" Drochelman, and great-grandson Brian Drochelman.

                                "My grandfather really respected the game of baseball," Bo Drochelman said. "He cherished it and he played every minute to the hilt. He was dedicated to the game, dedicated to hard work and it would make him proud that the same kind of person is moving toward his record."

                                Sisler once held the AL record for the longest consecutive-game hitting streak -- 41 games in 1922. He was still alive when Joe DiMaggio shattered the record with a 56-game streak in 1941.

                                "When Joe DiMaggio broke the record someone asked my grandfather how he felt about it," Peter Drochelman said. "He said, 'I think it's great and couldn't happen to a nicer guy.' In this instance, he would be saying the same kind of thing about Ichiro."

                                Now 81 years old, Frances has fond memories of her father, considered by some as the greatest first baseman to ever play the game, and certainly one of the nicest to play it.

                                "I am delighted to be here," she said. "I had it wonderful growing up. I had three brothers and was the only girl in the family, so I ignored baseball pretty much. My father was a gentleman and I love the fact they called him 'Gentleman George,' because he was such a gentleman. From what I have been told, Ichiro also is a gentleman."

                                As they reminisced inside a room full of national and international media, the Sisler offspring talked of George being so modest that he refused to talk about his own career.

                                "My brother and I would try to get stories out of him about his own exploits and he wouldn't budge," Bo said. "He would just never tell stories about himself. He might tell stories about other great players he played against, but he wouldn't talk about himself."

                                And there was so much to talk about. George Sisler played against Babe Ruth and Ty Cobb. He was the American League Most Valuable Player in 1922, when he batted .420 -- still the highest average ever in the AL.

                                As the oldest grandson, there were times when Bo received special privileges.

                                One of those times was when his retired grandfather and Branch Rickey were in the living room talking about which players they thought were potential Major League hitters and those that weren't.

                                "If I had a tape recorder at that point, I probably could have sold that tape for a lot of money," Bo said. Brian Drochelman, 30, Bo's son and George's great grandson, said, "My great-grandfather passed away the year before I was born so I didn't have a chance to know him. But I recently have been able to read some of the stories that have been written on him and to learn what a great person he was."

                                So great was Sisler that Cobb -- one of the roughest players in the game when he played -- went out of his way to be a gentleman around him.

                                "Maybe it was because of who my grandfather was on the field and as a person," Bo said, "but whenever they played against each other in St. Louis, [Cobb] would always come over to my grandfather and ask if my grandmother was in the stands.

                                "He respected her so much he was the ultimate gentleman when he talked to them."

                                Cobb reportedly once said that Sisler might have been the only player better than him and Sisler's one weakness was, "He was too much of a gentleman. When I went into a base, my spikes were up and if the guy was in the way, he was in trouble. If George was going into a base and it looked like he might hurt [the defender], he would back off.

                                "You have to admire a man like that."

                                Jim Street is a reporter for MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.

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