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Marcum, Jays avoid arbitration

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Defense Counts! View Post
    One failure is weak evidence. How did teams get by before LaRussa invented the closer role?

    The best reliever on the team should be used when the game is on the line. If the score is close in the seventh inning with the bases loaded, why would you bring in a weaker pitcher and risk losing the game at that point? The idea of only using the best RP in the ninth with nobody on base and a two or three run lead is just silly. One of the ESPN writers wrote an article on why the save is grossly overrated, and he quoted a statistical summary based on decades of games which showed that a lead in the ninth, even of just one run, is almost always saved, regardless of the RP involved.

    I'll see if I dig up a link to the article.
    It was more Goose Gossage and the late 70s Yankees that really developed the closer role as we know it. I think there is a different skill set and mental make up to come and go 1-2-3 in the 9th as opposed to getting a guy to pop up in the 7th. Before the 9th inning its more determined by individual matchups (righty vs righty, lefty vs. lefty, particular batters history against one of your pitchers, etc)

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    • #17
      I know one failure is weak evidence but it is really the only evidence I can really show of the closer-by-committee in the last two decades. It might have worked back before LaRussa/Yankees defined the modern day closer but it's different landscape nowadays. Every other major league team will name a closer for opening day and the Jays should be no different. Every bullpen needs its alpha dog.

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