Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Left-Handed Catchers

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    Originally posted by Richmond Hill Phoenix
    I don't really find it a problem when there's a lefty at bat (I'm a right-handed catcher). Is it really that big of a deal for some people?
    It may not be that much of a problem but I would think that it's just one more addition however small it may be to some of the other reasons given here as to why LH throwing catchers face some negatives RH catchers do not.

    Never caught, but it seems that depending on where the batter is in the box it would be a more clear throwing line if the batter is on the glove side of the catcher, no obstruction making the throw on steal attempts.

    As I did say earlier overall the LH catcher faces some disadvantages RH throwing catchers do not. The guys on the field know it, you would think by now there would be some LH throwing catchers if it were more feasible.
    Last edited by SHOELESSJOE3; 03-24-2007, 05:43 AM.

    Comment


    • #32
      Last year there were 1515 steals in the NL in 2590 games. There were 610 CS. So that his 2125 attempts per 2590 games or .82 attempts per game. That just isn't that important.

      Comment


      • #33
        Originally posted by Ubiquitous
        Last year there were 1515 steals in the NL in 2590 games. There were 610 CS. So that his 2125 attempts per 2590 games or .82 attempts per game. That just isn't that important.
        I get the point but it could be of importance in some game situations. I think in my previous post I did say it was small or minor, but it's in the mix.

        My only point on this one, only saying with the far higher number of RH batters the throw could be more difficult for a LH catcher more often than for a RH catcher.

        Again this is only one, a minor disadvantage, there are more. I don't think I'll live long enough to see a LH throwing catcher, too many negatives.

        I see some seeing LH catching another way, like it could be, it might work. I don't think so. We would have seen one by this time.

        Comment


        • #34
          What makes a LH thowing catcher in MLB even less likely, besides some disadvantages is the fact that in "most cases" it's not often to see one going back to even little league baseball.

          In the few cases in little league where you might, as the player progesses you see even less lefty throwing catchers.

          Comment


          • #35
            you guys may want to check out this article.
            http://www.hardballtimes.com/main/ar...hers-for-2006/
            http://dalewmiller.com

            Comment


            • #36
              Originally posted by thefeckcampaign View Post
              you guys may want to check out this article.
              http://www.hardballtimes.com/main/ar...hers-for-2006/
              He mentions that lefty catchers have an easier play on bunts and slow rollers in front of the plate. When my son was 9 or 10, he laid down a perfect bunt down the first base line. The lefty catcher quickly got to it, and since he had a clear throw to 1B, his throw just nipped my son. I remember thinking a righthanded catcher's throw would probably have either hit my son or been way off the mark.

              I couldn't find a lefthanded catchers glove when I played LL so I was doomed to a mediocre career at 1B, RF and P.
              "He's tougher than a railroad sandwich."
              "You'se Got The Eye Of An Eagle."

              Comment


              • #37
                you guys are right about no high school coach would put a left in the infield except at 1st and pitcher. my brother tried out for the JV baseball team, he was a freshmen and he T:left and B:right. well he was better then half the guys who made the team. his coach from 8th grade moved up to JV and wanted him but the 4 Varsity coaches said no beccause he plays second base and hes a lefty and they also said he was too short, like wtf? thats a bullshyt excuse. my brother was amazing at second base, and he didnt have a single strike out in 8th grade, he was on base 90% of the time, but they said no because he was a lefty at second. i used to play first base and he played second on the same team through out little league and he was the best second base player out there. all i know it the team sucked because of the players they picked and missed out on a great player in my brother because they never gave him a chance. i was sorta in the same thing too...i was a righty 1st base and in 8th grade they always put leftys there so i was always sitting. i hate the discrimination in baseball like that.
                Lets Go Mets, Jets, Islanders !!!

                Comment


                • #38
                  Originally posted by GuitarPunk2512 View Post
                  you guys are right about no high school coach would put a left in the infield except at 1st and pitcher. my brother tried out for the JV baseball team, he was a freshmen and he T:left and B:right. well he was better then half the guys who made the team. his coach from 8th grade moved up to JV and wanted him but the 4 Varsity coaches said no beccause he plays second base and hes a lefty and they also said he was too short, like wtf? thats a bullshyt excuse. my brother was amazing at second base, and he didnt have a single strike out in 8th grade, he was on base 90% of the time, but they said no because he was a lefty at second. i used to play first base and he played second on the same team through out little league and he was the best second base player out there. all i know it the team sucked because of the players they picked and missed out on a great player in my brother because they never gave him a chance. i was sorta in the same thing too...i was a righty 1st base and in 8th grade they always put leftys there so i was always sitting. i hate the discrimination in baseball like that.
                  1) A lefty 2B is a completely different situation from a lefty C
                  2) Lefty 1B have a SLIGHT advantage but there are plenty of righty 1B
                  Mythical SF Chronicle scouting report: "That Jeff runs like a deer. Unfortunately, he also hits AND throws like one." I am Venus DeMilo - NO ARM! I can play like a big leaguer, I can field like Luzinski, run like Lombardi. The secret to managing is keeping the ones who hate you away from the undecided ones. I am a triumph of quantity over quality. I'm almost useful, every village needs an idiot.
                  Good traders: MadHatter(2), BoofBonser26, StormSurge

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    I always figured that 2B would be the hardest. Can you imagine trying the pivot on a DP lefty.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Death to Crawling Things View Post
                      I always figured that 2B would be the hardest. Can you imagine trying the pivot on a DP lefty.
                      Sure -- the only really big problem is that they'd be facing the outfield rather than the infield when they pivoted. It could cause small problems holding a runner at third (for example). And I'm not sure how well they could cover second on a SBA. But if you've got a lefty thrower with a good arm and plenty of defensive range it could work.

                      A LH 2B would have to develop an unorthodox style to get the job done, but it'd be foolish to say it could NEVER happen.

                      I've always thought a LH C would have an advantage in a play at the plate when the ball is coming in from right field. A RH C has to pivot and brace or have his back to the runner while fielding the throw -- a lefty could stand sideways on to the throw and brace to recieve the runner while the ball was still airborne. On a great throw, a LH C also might have the ability to make the play from outside the basepaths and avoid the collision altogether and make the out on a backhand sweep tag -- like a righty 1B making a tag on a throw that's to his left.

                      The real problem for a lefty throwing catcher is that in forementioned collision play their throwing arm is in EXTREME jeapordy. Especially on a throw from right, that shoulder would be the first thing to get hit. It might mean the life expectancy for a LH C would be shorter.

                      They might also have an advantage when blocking the plate because the baserunner wouldn't have as easy a shot at their glove arm if they tried to dislodge the baseball.
                      Last edited by Imgran; 08-08-2008, 10:38 AM.

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        I could see the 2B working out if they played closer to the bag enabling to take a more circular route to make the spinning required easier. Still iffy, and would require an acrobat. But the 4-6-3 DP in some cases would be made easier. Unless the ball is hit to his right the 2B would come up ready to throw. And for 2B/SS/3B balls hit to their left they'd have a general advantage getting in position to throw to first.

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          He'd have to stand on the infield side of second base with his back to the catcher in order to turn it cleanly. That might mean it'd be trickier to get into position while playing with the infield back -- a bit further to run.

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Yeah, that was where I was thinking he'd end up. I was trying to figure out where he'd need to play to have a decent chance to get in that position. Anyhow, the SS needs to relay it over to him even more perfectly than normal. It absolutely has to be on the glove side to make it possible.

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              FWIW, I played 2nd base as a lefty in softball, and turned some double plays. If the throw was to my glove side, I'd spin around clockwise and then make the throw. I prefered the ball to my left side.

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                The only practical reason you wouldn't want an LH catcher would be because their throwing arm -- a catcher's bread and butter nearly as much as a pitcher's -- would be more exposed on a plate-blocking play, leading to a much increased risk of arm injuries. Beyond that I have a hard time believing any common play or incident would be beyond the skills of a properly talented LH C.

                                Comment

                                Ad Widget

                                Collapse
                                Working...
                                X