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  • Imgran
    replied
    Originally posted by RuthMayBond View Post
    I already dealt with C, and only claiming that 2B could do it does nothing to establish your point.
    It does if you understand exactly what I was originally saying.

    My intended point was to establish the simple fact that EVERY defensive position that is considered at least moderately difficult in the sport of baseball with exactly one exception (CF) has been reserved for righthanded throwers.

    If you want to tell me that lefthanded throwers that can handle those positions at the big league level don't come around very often? I'm down with that. If you want to tell me it's impossible though, as a red-blooded American I tend to bridle at that. Especially if we're talking about at least half of the defensive positions in baseball and all of the moderate to difficult ones.

    There's got to be at least one or two players in history who threw lefty and had the level of athleticism and creativity required to reinvent the position so a LHT could play it.
    Last edited by Imgran; 08-28-2009, 10:12 AM.

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  • ipitch
    replied
    Originally posted by Imgran View Post
    Like no righty catchers wind up throwing to the shortstop side of second base.

    If a catcher's throw tails, it's because it's lost enough velocity to start to sail, and he probably isn't throwing anyone out anyway.
    I'm not sure why you posted that, because you didn't tell me anything that I don't already know. I was merely explaining what a tailing throw is.

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  • RuthMayBond
    replied
    Originally posted by Imgran View Post
    Exaggerations are funny, but they do little to establish your point.

    There is no objective reason a lefthanded thrower couldn'y play C or 2B at least. They'd have to be dang good, but it shouldn't be impossible.
    I already dealt with C, and only claiming that 2B could do it does nothing to establish your point.

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  • RuthMayBond
    replied
    Originally posted by Imgran View Post
    I don't see a huge difference between a LHT second baseman throwing to first
    Kind of happens a LOT



    Kind of HARDLY EVER happens

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  • Imgran
    replied
    Exaggerations are funny, but they do little to establish your point.

    There is no objective reason a lefthanded thrower couldn'y play C or 2B at least. They'd have to be dang good, but it shouldn't be impossible.

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  • RuthMayBond
    replied
    Originally posted by Imgran View Post
    Well, here I am.

    I recognize that it would be more difficult for a lefty thrower to be a gold glove caliber defensive infielder at the major league level. But no lefties can play infield, or any other defensively demanding position other than CF? Really?
    Read again. It would work for 1B and C but that's it.

    All of them are exclusively reserved for righthanded throwers. There is no institutional capacity to admit that even a standout exceptional wicked awesome lefthanded defender can handle those positions. That is absurd.>

    Go ahead, put a lefty 3B on your team. I will bunt against you all day until your 3B moves up and gets killed by a liner. But you would have "proved" your point

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  • Imgran
    replied
    Originally posted by RuthMayBond View Post
    You'll have to explain why it's any different for portsiders
    The one point he definitely has is that it will be a look and an angle umps aren't used to that might throw them off. But that's true of any new thing, and you can bet that if there was ever a starting lefthanded catcher the umpires would adjust.

    A lefthanded catcher would have to reinvent the wheel a little on how he handled the position, he couldn't do it exactly like a righthander does. That certainly doesn't mean that there isn't a way that can be devised for a lefty catcher to be just as effective.

    Honstly I'd throw second base in there. Shortstops have to throw accurately mostly to their left, which means they benefit a great deal from being able to go across their bodies. Depending on the play, second basemen have to throw both ways so they might be able to develop enough to cope, and the throw to first isn't as long anyway. I don't see a huge difference between a LHT second baseman throwing to first, and a shortstop going to third, a throw they have to execute well on their arm side.

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  • Imgran
    replied
    Originally posted by ipitch View Post
    No, metrotheme is right. If a lefty's throw tailed, it would end up on the shortstop side of 2nd base.
    Like no righty catchers wind up throwing to the shortstop side of second base.

    If a catcher's throw tails, it's because it's lost enough velocity to start to sail, and he probably isn't throwing anyone out anyway.

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  • Imgran
    replied
    Originally posted by SHOELESSJOE3 View Post
    We all have our opinions but I have no idea how anyone who has seen the layout of the diamond and watched even a half dozen games is unable to able to realize why there are no LH throwing second, third basemen or shortstops.
    Well, here I am.

    I recognize that it would be more difficult for a lefty thrower to be a gold glove caliber defensive infielder at the major league level. But no lefties can play infield, or any other defensively demanding position other than CF? Really?

    Look at what the prime defensive positions around the diamond are. All of them are exclusively reserved for righthanded throwers. There is no institutional capacity to admit that even a standout exceptional wicked awesome lefthanded defender can handle those positions. That is absurd.

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  • RuthMayBond
    replied
    Originally posted by Webby1 View Post
    In all the posts about lefty catchers, I've read about base-stealing and tailing throws and the dangers of the close play at the plate, and maybe somebody mentioned bunting (not sure) but I did not see one of the key problems - and that is getting strike calls. A lefty is set up wrong and his mechanics are wrong to help the umpire make the "right" call on inside/outside edges. That doesn;t matter at young ages, any more than some of the other fine points mentioned, But by HS level if not sooner, success is going to be limited. If a kid wants to have fun as catcher and you can fine a lefty mitt, why not. But if there are any aspirations to be on an elite team or go beyond amateur ball, the time a lefty spends catching would be better served in another position.
    You'll have to explain why it's any different for portsiders

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  • Webby1
    replied
    Aren't we forgetting something?

    In all the posts about lefty catchers, I've read about base-stealing and tailing throws and the dangers of the close play at the plate, and maybe somebody mentioned bunting (not sure) but I did not see one of the key problems - and that is getting strike calls. A lefty is set up wrong and his mechanics are wrong to help the umpire make the "right" call on inside/outside edges. That doesn;t matter at young ages, any more than some of the other fine points mentioned, But by HS level if not sooner, success is going to be limited. If a kid wants to have fun as catcher and you can fine a lefty mitt, why not. But if there are any aspirations to be on an elite team or go beyond amateur ball, the time a lefty spends catching would be better served in another position.

    Leave a comment:


  • ipitch
    replied
    Originally posted by RuthMayBond View Post
    But isn't it more likely that it would curve towards the second baseman side?
    From what I've seen, throws from catchers and outfielders tail a lot more often than they curve.

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  • RuthMayBond
    replied
    Originally posted by ipitch View Post
    No, metrotheme is right. If a lefty's throw tailed, it would end up on the shortstop side of 2nd base.
    But isn't it more likely that it would curve towards the second baseman side?

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  • ipitch
    replied
    Originally posted by RuthMayBond View Post
    Um, a lefty throw should tail to the 2B side of the bag, unless the guys throwing a screwball.
    No, metrotheme is right. If a lefty's throw tailed, it would end up on the shortstop side of 2nd base.

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  • thefeckcampaign
    replied
    Originally posted by metrotheme View Post

    I'd love to hear Mattingly's take on a lefty playing the infield.
    That's right. What did he do, play 3B for a few games in 85? I remember that though I am not sure on the year.

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