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  • Baseball Personalities

    In the excellent "Getting To Know BBF" thread we listed our favorite teams and players. In this thread, let's list our favorite (and least favorite if you wish) baseball personalities. This can be a player, manager, owner, broadcaster, scout or whatever you wish. I'll start off:

    Favorite Baseball Personality: Birdie Tebbetts. Player, manager, scout-all around baseball man. Also a sharp wit & a fine writer as witness "Birdie: Confessions of a Baseball Nomad", his funny memoir, and "I'd Rather Catch", a sharp article he wrote for the Sept. 1949 The Atlantic Monthly. All in all, an intelligent man but not an arrogant one.

    Least Favorite Baseball Personality: Charles Comiskey. Cheapskate and miser. The root cause of the Black Sox Scandal.

    Brownie31

  • #2
    Jerry Remy. Hes a god in some parts of New England.

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    • #3
      Favorite Baseball Personality: Stan Musial. He's a St. Louis star that is a great person and was an amazing ballplayer.
      GOT ALBERT?
      St. Louis Cardinals BBFTG Website
      http://www.freewebs.com/bbftg6/

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Brownie31

        Least Favorite Baseball Personality: Charles Comiskey. Cheapskate and miser. The root cause of the Black Sox Scandal.

        Brownie31
        So what was Comiskey like? Did he tell any good jokes? What was his smile like? What was his scowl like? How did he treat his friends, how did he treat his opponents? His employees, his family? What kind of a handshake did he have? Cheapskate, miser, root cause of throwing the world series?

        Truth is very very few people alive today know what Charles Comiskey's personalilty was.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Ubiquitous
          So what was Comiskey like? Did he tell any good jokes? What was his smile like? What was his scowl like? How did he treat his friends, how did he treat his opponents? His employees, his family? What kind of a handshake did he have? Cheapskate, miser, root cause of throwing the world series?

          Truth is very very few people alive today know what Charles Comiskey's personalilty was.
          Per a number of books and articles, he treated his on the field employees, who were winning him titles, very badly. They were vastly underpaid (even by the low standards of the day) and lied to. He is reported to have lavished food and drink on sports writers who in turn portrayed him as a jolly good fellow. He also carried on a bitter feud with AL President Ban Johnson, especially during 1919 World Series and after. Brownie31

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          • #6
            The players were not vastly under-paid by any standard of that day or in that day of baseball.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Ubiquitous
              The players were not vastly under-paid by any standard of that day or in that day of baseball.
              Joe Jackson was making $6,000.00 per year while Cobb, Speaker and White Sox team mate Eddie Collins were making salaries well into the five figures. Also, Cicotte was promised a bonus if he won thirty games. Comiskey had Gleason bench him after his 29th win. Brownie31

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              • #8
                So Eddie Collins, one of Joe Jackson white sox teammates was making well into 5 figures? So that makes Comiskey a cheapskate? Joe Jackson signed that contract with the Indians for that pay level not with Comiskey. The white sox had some of the highest paid players per position in the game of that era.

                Cicotte and the bonus rumor/myth came up many many years later. If anything it is a merger from a story of 1917 and for the record Cicotte had a chance for 30 in 1919.

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                • #9
                  my two favorite personalities during my lifetime would probably have to be derek jeter and alex rodriguez. while bonds and mcguire were juicin, these guys showed us what baseball's really about.
                  Yankees '09

                  Arod, CC, AJ, DJ and Tex

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Ubiquitous
                    So Eddie Collins, one of Joe Jackson white sox teammates was making well into 5 figures? So that makes Comiskey a cheapskate? Joe Jackson signed that contract with the Indians for that pay level not with Comiskey. The white sox had some of the highest paid players per position in the game of that era.

                    Cicotte and the bonus rumor/myth came up many many years later. If anything it is a merger from a story of 1917 and for the record Cicotte had a chance for 30 in 1919.
                    Eddie Collins also signed his contract with his former team, the Athletics. As to the White Sox having some of the highest paid players per position, please advise where I can find this information. My previous readings have indicated otherwise, but I have an open mind.

                    One book I have relied heavily on, since it is the most recent one I have read on the subject, is Victor Luhrs' "The Great Baseball Mystery". Again, I am open to any other info you can provide.

                    Brownie31

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                    • #11
                      Eddie signed a 5 year contract for 15,000 a year plus a $15,000 bonus to Comiskey not to the A's. Making him without the bonus the third highest paid player in the game. Don't know what kind of bonuses Cobb and Speaker got, if very little then Collins with the bonus factored in was the highest paid player in the game, and a "cheapskate miser" signed him to that contract.

                      As for the contract is a mixture of Bill Veeck and Sporting news. Veeck many years later found a lot of Grabiners documents in old elevator shaft at the Park. Included in those documents were contracts for players of that era.

                      Ray Schalk was the highest paid catcher
                      Buck Weaver was probably the highest paid third basemen in the game
                      Eddie Collins was the highest paid secondbasemen.

                      The AL was the premier league they paid there players on the whole the best. Alexander was probably the NL's highest paid player at 12,000 and he and his catcher had to stage a tandem holdout to get even that. MEanwhile the AL had Cobb, Speaker, and Collins at the above salaries.

                      The cheapskate miser Comiskey housed three of the highest paid position players in the game that to me doesn't smack of miserliness. He was willing to pay for talents he wasn't going to be stupid about it but its clear he was willing to spend money to acquire talent and spend money to that talent.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Ubiquitous
                        Eddie signed a 5 year contract for 15,000 a year plus a $15,000 bonus to Comiskey not to the A's. Making him without the bonus the third highest paid player in the game. Don't know what kind of bonuses Cobb and Speaker got, if very little then Collins with the bonus factored in was the highest paid player in the game, and a "cheapskate miser" signed him to that contract.

                        As for the contract is a mixture of Bill Veeck and Sporting news. Veeck many years later found a lot of Grabiners documents in old elevator shaft at the Park. Included in those documents were contracts for players of that era.

                        Ray Schalk was the highest paid catcher
                        Buck Weaver was probably the highest paid third basemen in the game
                        Eddie Collins was the highest paid secondbasemen.

                        The AL was the premier league they paid there players on the whole the best. Alexander was probably the NL's highest paid player at 12,000 and he and his catcher had to stage a tandem holdout to get even that. MEanwhile the AL had Cobb, Speaker, and Collins at the above salaries.

                        The cheapskate miser Comiskey housed three of the highest paid position players in the game that to me doesn't smack of miserliness. He was willing to pay for talents he wasn't going to be stupid about it but its clear he was willing to spend money to acquire talent and spend money to that talent.
                        I am interested in seeing the Sporting News info. Is it in book form or on a website? Is the Veeck info in either "Veeck As In Wreck" or "The Huster's Handbook"? It has been many years since I have read either. My interest is aroused because my readings have pointed otherwise. What is your take on why the Black Sox scandal occurred?

                        Brownie31

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                        • #13
                          I believe it was in the Hustler's handbook. The sporting news is online.

                          My views or for that matter anyones views on the black sox would cause a lot of people to crawl out of the woodwork and rehash a fight we have had on this site too many times to recount. My views and many others are over in the history section and even in the minor league section.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Ubiquitous
                            I believe it was in the Hustler's handbook. The sporting news is online.

                            My views or for that matter anyones views on the black sox would cause a lot of people to crawl out of the woodwork and rehash a fight we have had on this site too many times to recount. My views and many others are over in the history section and even in the minor league section.
                            Agreed as to not rehashing the Black Sox scandal here. However, if you are interested in where my viewpoints come from, a good start would be "The Great Baseball Mystery" by Victor Luhrs.

                            Thanks for your info. I will look into it.

                            Brownie31

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Ubiquitous
                              I believe it was in the Hustler's handbook. The sporting news is online.

                              My views or for that matter anyones views on the black sox would cause a lot of people to crawl out of the woodwork and rehash a fight we have had on this site too many times to recount. My views and many others are over in the history section and even in the minor league section.
                              Ubiquitous: I have been reading the Joe Jackson Innocent thread (sorry if I have gotten the thread title wrong) and it is becoming evident to me that research pointed out by you and others dispel many Comiskey myths. My previous opinion was formed by "Eight Men Out" (both the book and movie) and Victor Luhrs' The Great Baseball Mystery". Also, I intend to read the new Carney book that has been mentioned frequently. I am very impressed with all of your posts-they are obviously those of an intelligent and civilized person, something the world needs more of. Keep up the good work. Brownie31

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