Announcement

Collapse

Updated Baseball Fever Policy

Baseball Fever Policy

I. Purpose of this announcement:

This announcement describes the policies pertaining to the operation of Baseball Fever.

Baseball Fever is a moderated baseball message board which encourages and facilitates research and information exchange among fans of our national pastime. The intent of the Baseball Fever Policy is to ensure that Baseball Fever remains an extremely high quality, extremely low "noise" environment.

Baseball Fever is administrated by three principal administrators:
webmaster - Baseball Fever Owner
The Commissioner - Baseball Fever Administrator
Macker - Baseball Fever Administrator

And a group of forum specific super moderators. The role of the moderator is to keep Baseball Fever smoothly and to screen posts for compliance with our policy. The moderators are ALL volunteer positions, so please be patient and understanding of any delays you might experience in correspondence.

II. Comments about our policy:

Any suggestions on this policy may be made directly to the webmaster.

III. Acknowledgments:

This document was based on a similar policy used by SABR.

IV. Requirements for participation on Baseball Fever:

Participation on Baseball Fever is available to all baseball fans with a valid email address, as verified by the forum's automated system, which then in turn creates a single validated account. Multiple accounts by a single user are prohibited.

By registering, you agree to adhere to the policies outlined in this document and to conduct yourself accordingly. Abuse of the forum, by repeated failure to abide by these policies, will result in your access being blocked to the forum entirely.

V. Baseball Fever Netiquette:

Participants at Baseball Fever are required to adhere to these principles, which are outlined in this section.
a. All posts to Baseball Fever should be written in clear, concise English, with proper grammar and accurate spelling. The use of abbreviations should be kept to a minimum; when abbreviation is necessary, they should be either well-known (such as etc.), or explained on their first use in your post.

b. Conciseness is a key attribute of a good post.

c. Quote only the portion of a post to which you are responding.

d. Standard capitalization and punctuation make a large difference in the readability of a post. TYPING IN ALL CAPITALS is considered to be "shouting"; it is a good practice to limit use of all capitals to words which you wish to emphasize.

e. It is our policy NOT to transmit any defamatory or illegal materials.

f. Personal attacks of any type against Baseball Fever readers will not be tolerated. In these instances the post will be copied by a moderator and/or administrator, deleted from the site, then sent to the member who made the personal attack via a Private Message (PM) along with a single warning. Members who choose to not listen and continue personal attacks will be banned from the site.

g. It is important to remember that many contextual clues available in face-to-face discussion, such as tone of voice and facial expression, are lost in the electronic forum. As a poster, try to be alert for phrasing that might be misinterpreted by your audience to be offensive; as a reader, remember to give the benefit of the doubt and not to take umbrage too easily. There are many instances in which a particular choice of words or phrasing can come across as being a personal attack where none was intended.

h. The netiquette described above (a-g) often uses the term "posts", but applies equally to Private Messages.

VI. Baseball Fever User Signature Policy

A signature is a piece of text that some members may care to have inserted at the end of ALL of their posts, a little like the closing of a letter. You can set and / or change your signature by editing your profile in the UserCP. Since it is visible on ALL your posts, the following policy must be adhered to:

Signature Composition
Font size limit: No larger than size 2 (This policy is a size 2)
Style: Bold and italics are permissible
Character limit: No more than 500 total characters
Lines: No more than 4 lines
Colors: Most colors are permissible, but those which are hard to discern against the gray background (yellow, white, pale gray) should be avoided
Images/Graphics: Allowed, but nothing larger than 20k and Content rules must be followed

Signature Content
No advertising is permitted
Nothing political or religious
Nothing obscene, vulgar, defamatory or derogatory
Links to personal blogs/websites are permissible - with the webmaster's written consent
A Link to your Baseball Fever Blog does not require written consent and is recommended
Quotes must be attributed. Non-baseball quotes are permissible as long as they are not religious or political

Please adhere to these rules when you create your signature. Failure to do so will result in a request to comply by a moderator. If you do not comply within a reasonable amount of time, the signature will be removed and / or edited by an Administrator. Baseball Fever reserves the right to edit and / or remove any or all of your signature line at any time without contacting the account holder.

VII. Appropriate and inappropriate topics for Baseball Fever:

Most concisely, the test for whether a post is appropriate for Baseball Fever is: "Does this message discuss our national pastime in an interesting manner?" This post can be direct or indirect: posing a question, asking for assistance, providing raw data or citations, or discussing and constructively critiquing existing posts. In general, a broad interpretation of "baseball related" is used.

Baseball Fever is not a promotional environment. Advertising of products, web sites, etc., whether for profit or not-for-profit, is not permitted. At the webmaster's discretion, brief one-time announcements for products or services of legitimate baseball interest and usefulness may be allowed. If advertising is posted to the site it will be copied by a moderator and/or administrator, deleted from the site, then sent to the member who made the post via a Private Message (PM) along with a single warning. Members who choose to not listen and continue advertising will be banned from the site. If the advertising is spam-related, pornography-based, or a "visit-my-site" type post / private message, no warning at all will be provided, and the member will be banned immediately without a warning.

It is considered appropriate to post a URL to a page which specifically and directly answers a question posted on the list (for example, it would be permissible to post a link to a page containing home-road splits, even on a site which has advertising or other commercial content; however, it would not be appropriate to post the URL of the main page of the site). The site reserves the right to limit the frequency of such announcements by any individual or group.

In keeping with our test for a proper topic, posting to Baseball Fever should be treated as if you truly do care. This includes posting information that is, to the best of your knowledge, complete and accurate at the time you post. Any errors or ambiguities you catch later should be acknowledged and corrected in the thread, since Baseball Fever is sometimes considered to be a valuable reference for research information.

VIII. Role of the moderator:

When a post is submitted to Baseball Fever, it is forwarded by the server automatically and seen immediately. The moderator may:
a. Leave the thread exactly like it was submitted. This is the case 95% of the time.

b. Immediately delete the thread as inappropriate for Baseball Fever. Examples include advertising, personal attacks, or spam. This is the case 1% of the time.

c. Move the thread. If a member makes a post about the Marlins in the Yankees forum it will be moved to the appropriate forum. This is the case 3% of the time.

d. Edit the message due to an inappropriate item. This is the case 1% of the time. There have been new users who will make a wonderful post, then add to their signature line (where your name / handle appears) a tagline that is a pure advertisement. This tagline will be removed, a note will be left in the message so he/she is aware of the edit, and personal contact will be made to the poster telling them what has been edited and what actions need to be taken to prevent further edits.

The moderators perform no checks on posts to verify factual or logical accuracy. While he/she may point out gross errors in factual data in replies to the thread, the moderator does not act as an "accuracy" editor. Also moderation is not a vehicle for censorship of individuals and/or opinions, and the moderator's decisions should not be taken personally.

IX. Legal aspects of participation in Baseball Fever:

By submitting a post to Baseball Fever, you grant Baseball Fever permission to distribute your message to the forum. Other rights pertaining to the post remain with the ORIGINAL author, and you may not redistribute or retransmit any posts by any others, in whole or in part, without the express consent of the original author.

The messages appearing on Baseball Fever contain the opinions and views of their respective authors and are not necessarily those of Baseball Fever, or of the Baseball Almanac family of sites.

Sincerely,

Sean Holtz, Webmaster of Baseball Almanac & Baseball Fever
www.baseball-almanac.com | www.baseball-fever.com
"Baseball Almanac: Sharing Baseball. Sharing History."
See more
See less

Some 19th Century Ballparks

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Some 19th Century Ballparks

    Here is a little info on some of the ballparks used in the late 1800's...

    Note: All material i have put together is from the great site of Ballparks by Munsey and Suppes: http://ballparks.com/baseball/index.htm

    It is probably the best site I have seen as far as ballpark information goes...

    I put a pic here and there as well as a little info.. If you click on the links I put for each park bio, you can view all the dimensions directly from the site...

    It also has other past, present and future park info as well!

    If anyone has any other parks to add, please do so
    Last edited by Baseball Guru; 07-20-2006, 03:02 PM.
    "There are three things in my life which I really love: God, my family, and baseball. The only problem - once baseball season starts, I change the order around a bit.
    ~~Al Gallagher


    God Bless America!

    Click here to see my baseball tribute site!

    Click here to see the best pitcher NOT in the HOF!

    sigpic

  • #2
    Exposition Park

    Tenant: Pittsburgh Pirates (NL)
    Opened: 1890
    First Pirates game: April 22, 1891
    First night game: Never
    Last Pirates game: June 29, 1909
    Surface: Grass
    Capacity: 16,000 (1914)

    For more info as well as a few photos go here: http://ballparks.com/baseball/national/exposi.htm
    "There are three things in my life which I really love: God, my family, and baseball. The only problem - once baseball season starts, I change the order around a bit.
    ~~Al Gallagher


    God Bless America!

    Click here to see my baseball tribute site!

    Click here to see the best pitcher NOT in the HOF!

    sigpic

    Comment


    • #3
      Baker Bowl

      Tenant: Philadelphia Phillies (NL)
      Opened: April 30, 1887
      Reopened: April 14, 1904
      First night game: Never
      Last game: June 30, 1938 (14-1 loss to the NY Giants)
      Demolished: 1950
      Capacity: 18,000 (1895); 20,000 (1929); 18,800 (1930).




      For more information on this park visit: http://ballparks.com/baseball/national/bakerb.htm
      "There are three things in my life which I really love: God, my family, and baseball. The only problem - once baseball season starts, I change the order around a bit.
      ~~Al Gallagher


      God Bless America!

      Click here to see my baseball tribute site!

      Click here to see the best pitcher NOT in the HOF!

      sigpic

      Comment


      • #4
        Robison Field

        Tenant: St. Louis Cardinals (NL)
        Opened: April 27, 1893
        First night game: Never
        Last Cardinals game: June 6, 1920
        Surface: Grass
        Capacity: 14,500 (1893); 15,200 (1899); 21,000 (1909).


        For more information on this park visit:http://ballparks.com/baseball/national/robiso.htm
        "There are three things in my life which I really love: God, my family, and baseball. The only problem - once baseball season starts, I change the order around a bit.
        ~~Al Gallagher


        God Bless America!

        Click here to see my baseball tribute site!

        Click here to see the best pitcher NOT in the HOF!

        sigpic

        Comment


        • #5
          South End Grounds

          E Grounds I .........................S E Grounds II .........................S E Grounds III
          Tenants: Boston Braves - A.K.A. Red Caps, Doves, Rustlers, Beaneaters, Bees (NL, 1876-1914)
          Opened: May 16, 1871 ..........May 25, 1888 ..........................July 20, 1894
          Last game: Sep. 10, 1887 ......May 15, 1894 ..........................Aug. 11, 1914
          Capacity: n/a ......................6,800 (1888) ...........................n/a
          Fate: Demolished 9/87 ...........Burned down ...........................Demolished
          Surface: Grass (all three ballparks)



          For more info as well as more great pics, visit: http://ballparks.com/baseball/national/sthend.htm
          Last edited by Baseball Guru; 07-20-2006, 02:57 PM.
          "There are three things in my life which I really love: God, my family, and baseball. The only problem - once baseball season starts, I change the order around a bit.
          ~~Al Gallagher


          God Bless America!

          Click here to see my baseball tribute site!

          Click here to see the best pitcher NOT in the HOF!

          sigpic

          Comment


          • #6
            Washington Park

            Tenant: Brooklyn Superbas (later Dodgers; NL)
            Opened: April 30, 1898
            First night game: Never
            Last Superbas game: October 5, 1912
            Surface: Grass
            Capacity: 18,800 (1914).

            For more info visit: http://ballparks.com/baseball/national/washin.htm
            "There are three things in my life which I really love: God, my family, and baseball. The only problem - once baseball season starts, I change the order around a bit.
            ~~Al Gallagher


            God Bless America!

            Click here to see my baseball tribute site!

            Click here to see the best pitcher NOT in the HOF!

            sigpic

            Comment


            • #7
              West Side Grounds

              Tenant: Chicago Cubs (NL)
              Opened: May 14, 1893
              First night game: Never
              Last Cubs game: October 3, 1915
              Surface: Grass
              Capacity: 16,000



              For more info visit: http://ballparks.com/baseball/national/wstsid.htm
              "There are three things in my life which I really love: God, my family, and baseball. The only problem - once baseball season starts, I change the order around a bit.
              ~~Al Gallagher


              God Bless America!

              Click here to see my baseball tribute site!

              Click here to see the best pitcher NOT in the HOF!

              sigpic

              Comment


              • #8
                Bennett Park

                Tenant: Detroit Tigers (AL)
                Opened: 1896
                First Tigers game: April 25, 1901
                First night game: Never
                Last Tigers game: September 10, 1911 (Tiger Stadium was built on the site in 1912).
                Surface: Grass
                Capacity: 5,000 (1896); 8,500 (1901); 14,000 (1910).




                For more info visit: http://ballparks.com/baseball/american/bennet.htm
                "There are three things in my life which I really love: God, my family, and baseball. The only problem - once baseball season starts, I change the order around a bit.
                ~~Al Gallagher


                God Bless America!

                Click here to see my baseball tribute site!

                Click here to see the best pitcher NOT in the HOF!

                sigpic

                Comment


                • #9
                  Griffith Stadium

                  Tenants: Washington Senators I (Minnesota Twins; AL), 1903-1960; Washington Senators II (Texas Rangers; AL), 1961.
                  Opened: 1891
                  First Senators game: Aprill 22, 1903
                  Rebuilt: July 24, 1911
                  First night game: May 28, 1941
                  Last game: September 21, 1961
                  Demolished: January 26, 1965
                  Capacity: 32,000 (1921); 27,550 (1961).




                  For more info visit: http://ballparks.com/baseball/american/griffi.htm
                  "There are three things in my life which I really love: God, my family, and baseball. The only problem - once baseball season starts, I change the order around a bit.
                  ~~Al Gallagher


                  God Bless America!

                  Click here to see my baseball tribute site!

                  Click here to see the best pitcher NOT in the HOF!

                  sigpic

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Polo Grounds

                    Polo Grounds I
                    Tenant: New York Giants
                    Opened: 1883
                    Last game: 1888
                    Capacity: n/a
                    Location: Northern edge of Central Park between 5th & 6th Aves. from
                    110th to 112th Sts.
                    Fate: Abandoned when NYC confiscated the property



                    For more info please visit: http://ballparks.com/baseball/national/pologr.htm


                    "There are three things in my life which I really love: God, my family, and baseball. The only problem - once baseball season starts, I change the order around a bit.
                    ~~Al Gallagher


                    God Bless America!

                    Click here to see my baseball tribute site!

                    Click here to see the best pitcher NOT in the HOF!

                    sigpic

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Boundary Field

                      Boundary Field is a former baseball ground located in Washington, D.C. The ground was home to the Washington Nationals of the American Association in 1891 and then the National League from 1892 to 1899 after the League absorbed the Association. The League contracted in 1900 and the Nationals were a casualty.

                      The field was also called National Park and was on the same site as Griffith Stadium.

                      Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boundary_Field
                      "There are three things in my life which I really love: God, my family, and baseball. The only problem - once baseball season starts, I change the order around a bit.
                      ~~Al Gallagher


                      God Bless America!

                      Click here to see my baseball tribute site!

                      Click here to see the best pitcher NOT in the HOF!

                      sigpic

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Eclipse Park

                        Eclipse Park is the name of two former baseball grounds located in Louisville, Kentucky. The first ground was home to the Louisville Colonels of the American Association from 1882 to 1891 and then the National League from 1892 to 1893 after the League absorbed the Association. Semi-pro baseball had been played at this site as early as 1874.

                        The second Eclipse Park was also the home of the Louisville Colonels of the National League from 1893 to 1899. This ground was located in another site in Louisville, actually right across the street from the old park. This is also the ground at which Hall of Famer Honus Wagner made his Major League debut on July 19, 1897.

                        The unusual name for these ballparks derived from the original name of the Association club, the Eclipse. The obvious name Colonels eventually won out. Nonetheless, Eclipse was among the early team names to be a singular word, despite sounding like a plural.

                        A destructive fire in 1899 contributed significantly to the once-strong Louisville club being contracted after the end of the season. Team owner Barney Dreyfuss moved on to acquire the Pittsburgh Pirates. Instead of being scattered to the wind, the best players from the Louisville team roster were brought onto the Pittsburgh payroll, including Wagner, third baseman Tommy Leach, outfielder-manager Fred Clarke, and ace righthander Deacon Phillippe.

                        This "hybrid vigor" effect soon turned the perennial cellar-dwelling Pirates into a three-peat pennant winner, and a participant in the first modern World Series. Meanwhile, Louisville is still waiting in vain for major league baseball to return someday.

                        Both Eclipse Parks were located at the corner of 7th and Kentucky streets.

                        Some sources:

                        Green Cathedrals, by Phil Lowry
                        Ballparks of North America, by Michael Benson.
                        Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eclipse_Park_%28Louisville%29"


                        Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eclipse...8Louisville%29
                        "There are three things in my life which I really love: God, my family, and baseball. The only problem - once baseball season starts, I change the order around a bit.
                        ~~Al Gallagher


                        God Bless America!

                        Click here to see my baseball tribute site!

                        Click here to see the best pitcher NOT in the HOF!

                        sigpic

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          League Park



                          League Park was a baseball stadium located in Cleveland, Ohio. It was home to the National League Cleveland Spiders, the American League Cleveland Indians and the Cleveland Buckeyes of the Negro American League. It was located at the northeast corner of Lexington Avenue and E. 66th Street.

                          League Park was opened on May 1, 1891, and sat 9,000 on wooden seats at the time. The Spiders played there until going out of business after a disastrous 20–134 season in 1899 due to having their best players stripped from their roster by an unscrupulous owner. They were replaced the very next year by an entry in the new American League, which was initially a minor league and became a major league a year later. The stadium was rebuilt for the 1910 season, with concrete and steel grandstands, now seating 21,414. The owner renamed the park after himself, so for a while it was called "Dunn Field". After ownership changed hands, the name reverted to the more prosaic "League Park" (there were a number of professional teams' parks called by the generic "League Park" at one time, but in this case the name stuck). The Indians began playing night, holiday and weekend games at the far larger Cleveland Stadium in 1932, although in some years following they played exclusively at League Park. They split games between the two stadiums off and on until the end of the 1946 season. Lights were never installed at League Park, and it was thus impossible to play night games there. For 1947, under the ownership of Bill Veeck, the Indians moved to Cleveland Stadium full-time.

                          Because of a need to squeeze the ballfield into the Cleveland street grid, the stadium was rather oddly shaped by modern standards. It was only 290 feet down the right field line—though batters still had to surmount a 60-foot fence to hit a home run (by comparison, the Green Monster at Fenway Park is only 37 feet high). The fence in left field was only five feet tall, but batters had to hit the ball 375 feet down the line to hit a home run, and it was fully 460 feet to the scoreboard in the deepest part of center field. The diamond, situated in the northwest corner of the block, was slightly tilted counterclockwise, making right field not quite as easy a target as Baker Bowl's right field, for example.

                          After the demise of the Negro American League Cleveland Buckeyes following the 1950 season, League Park was no longer in use as a regular sports venue. The Cleveland Browns football team would continue to use the aging facility as a practice field until the late 1960s.

                          Today the site is a public park, which includes a baseball field in the approximate location of the original; a small section of the old first-base lower deck stands, including the exterior brick facade; and also the old ticket office behind what was the right field corner. The grandstand remnant was taken down ca. 2005 as part of a renovation process to the decaying playground.



                          Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/League_Park
                          "There are three things in my life which I really love: God, my family, and baseball. The only problem - once baseball season starts, I change the order around a bit.
                          ~~Al Gallagher


                          God Bless America!

                          Click here to see my baseball tribute site!

                          Click here to see the best pitcher NOT in the HOF!

                          sigpic

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Recreation Park



                            Recreation Park is a former baseball stadium located in Detroit. The ballpark was home to the Detroit Wolverines of the National League from 1881 to 1888. The Wolverines won the National League Pennant while playing at Recreation Park during the 1887 season. Recreation Park was also home to minor league teams in Detroit during 1889-1891 before being demolished in 1894.

                            The Park was on a rectangular site some distance north of the downtown. The field was laid out so that the foul lines hit the fences at a 135 degree angle, similar to the Polo Grounds and various other parks of that era. It was bounded on the south by Brady Street, on the east by Beaubien Street, and on the west by Harper Hospital, beyond which lay John R Street. Brush Street made a T-intersection against Brady at the southwest corner of the lot where the main entrance gate was. For that reason, the location is often given as simply "Brady and Brush Streets." A dirt track surrounded the baseball field and wooden stands.

                            Although the ballpark is long gone, Harper Hospital still exists, overlooking the site where the major league Wolverines once roamed. An historical marker commemorating Recreation Park is placed in what was once left field, among the buildings of the present Detroit Medical Center.


                            Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recreat..._%28Detroit%29
                            "There are three things in my life which I really love: God, my family, and baseball. The only problem - once baseball season starts, I change the order around a bit.
                            ~~Al Gallagher


                            God Bless America!

                            Click here to see my baseball tribute site!

                            Click here to see the best pitcher NOT in the HOF!

                            sigpic

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Haymakers' Grounds

                              Haymakers' Grounds is a former baseball ground located in Troy, New York. The ground was home to the Troy Haymakers of the National Association from 1871 to 1872 and the home of the Troy Trojans of the National League from 1880 to 1881.

                              Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haymakers%27_Grounds
                              "There are three things in my life which I really love: God, my family, and baseball. The only problem - once baseball season starts, I change the order around a bit.
                              ~~Al Gallagher


                              God Bless America!

                              Click here to see my baseball tribute site!

                              Click here to see the best pitcher NOT in the HOF!

                              sigpic

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X