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19th Century Baseball Cards

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  • #31
    More Goodwin Champions


    jack glasscock


    king kelly


    tim keefe


    the back of the card

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    • #32
      I have the card of Fred Dunlap! Apparently, my great great grandfather was a huge fan of Dunlap's (though he lived in New York and went to New York Giants games), and wanted to have something to remember him. In one of his old photo albums, neatly set in four cuts in the page, Dad found the Dunlap card, undamaged although pretty faded (except the four perfect corners...remember, they weren't exposed to any light and were under the black paper pages). What's really unfortunate is that he also supposedly had the Tim Keefe card, but lost it or got rid of it or something.
      "They put me in the Hall of Fame? They must really be scraping the bottom of the barrel!"
      -Eppa Rixey, upon learning of his induction to the Baseball Hall of Fame.

      Motafy (MO-ta-fy) vt. -fied, -fying 1. For a pitcher to melt down in a big game situation; to become like Guillermo Mota. 2. The transformation of a good pitcher into one of Guillermo Mota's caliber.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by Dalkowski110
        I have the card of Fred Dunlap! Apparently, my great great grandfather was a huge fan of Dunlap's (though he lived in New York and went to New York Giants games), and wanted to have something to remember him. In one of his old photo albums, neatly set in four cuts in the page, Dad found the Dunlap card, undamaged although pretty faded (except the four perfect corners...remember, they weren't exposed to any light and were under the black paper pages). What's really unfortunate is that he also supposedly had the Tim Keefe card, but lost it or got rid of it or something.
        that's pretty cool. any idea on how your great great grandfather came by the card? i assume, based on the front of the cards, that they came as inserts in packs of old judge and gypsy queen cigarettes.

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        • #34
          Originally posted by hubkittel
          that's pretty cool. any idea on how your great great grandfather came by the card? i assume, based on the front of the cards, that they came as inserts in packs of old judge and gypsy queen cigarettes.
          Any idea what that card is worth today?

          I was thinking about these old cigarette companies and how some of them went out of business. They probably had boxes of these old baseball cards still lying around the offices. Did they throw them away or did some bright young baseball fan offer to take them?
          "He's tougher than a railroad sandwich."
          "You'se Got The Eye Of An Eagle."

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          • #35
            1888 W.S. Kimball Champions

            an unnumbered set of colored lithograph cards, the kimball champions set featured four baseball players in a posed portrait above a drawing of the player in action.


            dell darling


            ernie burch


            hardie henderson


            tip o'neill


            the back of the card
            Last edited by hubkittel; 01-12-2007, 11:01 AM.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by TonyK
              Any idea what that card is worth today?
              i know the set is very popular and that some collectors consider them to be the most beautiful of the tobacco cards. i saw a general quote that had the value of the cards, in very good condition, at around $350.
              Last edited by hubkittel; 01-12-2007, 11:36 AM.

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              • #37
                The End of the 19th Cent Tobacco Era

                Originally posted by TonyK
                I was thinking about these old cigarette companies and how some of them went out of business. They probably had boxes of these old baseball cards still lying around the offices. Did they throw them away or did some bright young baseball fan offer to take them?
                it seems that a tobacco monopoly was formed in 1890 by buck duke. the american tobacco company merged the biggest tobacco companies in the united states, including allen & ginter, goodwin, and kimball. with the death of competition, there was no longer any need for promotional tools such as card inserts. once the trust was broken up, in 1907, baseball cards returned with a vengance.

                as far as excess inventory is concerned, you would have to assume that there was some, especially with the premiums, and that most of it was destroyed. it seems unlikely that anyone placed enough value on the promotional items of defunct companies to salvage them. it's amazing, really, how many of these cards have survived. you have to consider it a testimony to people's love for the game and the pack rat nature of human beings.

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                • #38
                  Worth around $350-$400 in the condition I have it.

                  "that they came as inserts in packs of old judge and gypsy queen cigarettes."

                  The former. Old Judge. The Old Judge Champions series came in the smaller cigarette packs, not with the cigars like the Old Judge and Gypsy Queen B&W photo cards.
                  "They put me in the Hall of Fame? They must really be scraping the bottom of the barrel!"
                  -Eppa Rixey, upon learning of his induction to the Baseball Hall of Fame.

                  Motafy (MO-ta-fy) vt. -fied, -fying 1. For a pitcher to melt down in a big game situation; to become like Guillermo Mota. 2. The transformation of a good pitcher into one of Guillermo Mota's caliber.

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by hubkittel
                    it seems that a tobacco monopoly was formed in 1890 by buck duke. the american tobacco company merged the biggest tobacco companies in the united states, including allen & ginter, goodwin, and kimball. with the death of competition, there was no longer any need for promotional tools such as card inserts. once the trust was broken up, in 1907, baseball cards returned with a vengance.

                    as far as excess inventory is concerned, you would have to assume that there was some, especially with the premiums, and that most of it was destroyed. it seems unlikely that anyone placed enough value on the promotional items of defunct companies to salvage them. it's amazing, really, how many of these cards have survived. you have to consider it a testimony to people's love for the game and the pack rat nature of human beings.
                    Whomever came up with the idea to put a collectible promotional item into a cigarette pack or cereal box was brilliant. My son used to buy his cereal based on what free item was inside the box.

                    Most baseball fans in the 1800's never saw what their heroes looked like. But they could buy the cigarettes and get pictures of all of the players. Kids probably traded them or sold them too. Did they ever have much value before the card craze of recent years?

                    Thanks to these cards we also know what all the players looked like too.
                    "He's tougher than a railroad sandwich."
                    "You'se Got The Eye Of An Eagle."

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Baseball Card Collection

                      Actually I have seen this collection before in person. My mon works at the LOC and the day I went their with her they had out this collection. They said it was from someone whose family donated it after he died. It was actually a quite impressive collection with cards ranging from size to min-carckerjack cards to ones bigger than postcards. The man who had out the collection let me look at the cards afterwards and they were truly a,azing and in suprisingly great shape. He also told me that that was the type of collection that comes out of the vault around every 50 years or so.
                      "The one constant through all the years has been baseball. America has rolled by like an army of steamrollers. It's been erased like a blackboard, rebuilt, and erased again. But baseball has marked the time. This field, this game, is a part of our past. It reminds us of all that once was good, and what could be again."


                      photobucket: http://s186.photobucket.com/albums/x115/ironman555/ttm/

                      http://s186.photobucket.com/albums/x...Ip%20and%20GU/

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by TonyK
                        Thanks to these cards we also know what all the players looked like too.
                        and that's really why i'm interested in these cards. i have a terrible time remembering names and numbers so when i have a picture or photo to go with the name and the stats it really helps me get a handle on the person. in some cases it helps to humanize someone who really is little more than a line of numbers in the baseball encyclopedia or a footnote to baseball history.

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Originally posted by ironman
                          Actually I have seen this collection before in person. My mon works at the LOC and the day I went their with her they had out this collection. They said it was from someone whose family donated it after he died. It was actually a quite impressive collection with cards ranging from size to min-carckerjack cards to ones bigger than postcards. The man who had out the collection let me look at the cards afterwards and they were truly a,azing and in suprisingly great shape. He also told me that that was the type of collection that comes out of the vault around every 50 years or so.
                          i have to admit that i'm insanely jealous. benjamin edwards was a collector of cigarette cards and had a collection of over 12,000 cards when he passed away. his daughter gave the cards to carl sandburg (of all people), who turned the collection over to the library of congress in 1954. i bet the rest of the collection (the non-baseball related cards) are fascinating too.

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                          • #43
                            These are some of the 19th century cards I own....

                            Some N172 Old Judges that my dad gave me when I was about 15


                            These are called Scrapps and were issued in 1887-1888 celebrating the championship series between St Louis and Detroit. There are 18 cards in the set.

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                            • #44
                              1888 Yum Yum Tobacco

                              produced by august beck & company, this set of 53 cards contained both photographs and drawings of players. it's believed that the drawings are copied from the old judge cards. the cards were inserted into packs of yum yum cigarettes and chewing tobacco.


                              jim o'rourke


                              mickey welch
                              Last edited by hubkittel; 01-17-2007, 01:07 PM.

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                              • #45
                                Originally posted by slidekellyslide
                                These are called Scrapps and were issued in 1887-1888 celebrating the championship series between St Louis and Detroit. There are 18 cards in the set.
                                i have pictures of nine of the 18 scrapps cards and i always thought they were pretty neat. i'll attach them below.

                                this is from cycleback's online museum of baseball memorabilia:

                                "Little is known about the orgins of these unusual cards. It was once incorrectly theorized that they were tobacco cards. Most likely they were 'punch-outs' from a kids album. The cards are die-cast and embossed, similiar to the 1880's Team Player Die-Casts."
                                Attached Files
                                Last edited by hubkittel; 01-17-2007, 11:18 AM.

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